Unit History – 8th Virginia Infantry

18 05 2022

Was organized at Leesburg, Virginia, in May, 1861. Its members were recruited in the counties of Loudoun, Prince William, and Fairfax. The unit was also called “Old Bloody Eighth” and from time to time “The Berkeley Regiment” because it’s Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, Major, and one Captain were the four Berkeley brothers. During the war it was brigaded under Generals Cocke, Pickett, R. B. Garnett, and Hunton. It fought at First Manassas and Leesburg, and in April, 1862, it totalled 450 effectives. The 8th was involved in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Gettysburg, served in the Department of Richmond, then took part in the conflicts at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. It went on to participate in the Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign, This unit sustained 30 casualties at First Manassas, lost 8 killed and 43 wounded of the 375 engaged at Leesburg, and had 10 killed and 66 wounded during the Seven Days’ Battles. Of the 193 engaged at Gettysburg about 90 percent were killed, wounded, or missing. From June 1 to December 31, 1864, it reported 53 casualties, and many were captured at Sayler’s Creek. Only 1 surgeon and 11 privates surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Norborne Berkeley and Eppa Hunton, Lieutenant Colonels Edmund Berkely and Charles B. Tebbs, and Majors William N. Berkeley and James Thrift.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 359-360





Unit History – 17th Virginia Infantry

17 05 2022

Was organized at Manassas, Virginia, in June, 1861, using the 6th Battalion Virginia Infantry as its nucleus. Men of this unit were recruited in the counties of Warren, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Fauquier. After fighting at First Manassas under General Longstreet, it was assigned to General Ewell’s, A. P. Hill’s, Kemper’s, and Corse’s Brigade. The 17th fought with the Army of Northern Viriginia from Williamsburg to Fredericksburg, then participated in Longstreet’s Suffolk Expedition. During the Gettysburg Campaign it was on detached duty at Gordonsville and later served in Tennessee and North Carolina. Returning to Virginia it fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Haror, saw action in the Petersburg trenches, and ended the war at Appomattox. This regiment totalled 600 men in April, 1862, lost 17 killed and 47 wounded at Williamsburg, had 18 killed and 41 wounded at Seven Pines, and had 17 killed, 23 wounded, and 73 missing at Frayser’s Farm. It reported 48 casualties at Second Manassas, 13 at South Mountain, and of the 55 engaged at Sharpsburg about 75 percent were disabled. At Drewry’s Bluff 7 were killed and 23 wounded. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 2 officers and 46 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Montgomery D. Corse, Arthur Herbert, and Morton Marye; Lieutenant Colonels William Munford and Grayson Tyler; and Majors George W. Brent and Robert H. Simpson.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 368





Unit History – 1st Virginia Infantry

16 05 2022

Completed its organization at Richmond, Virgnia, in May, 1861. At the outbreak of the war it had ten companies, but in April three were detached. This the unit contained seven companies from Richmond and mid-July a company from Washington, D. C. was added. It fought at First Manassas under General Longstreet and in August totalled 570 men. During April, 1862, when the regiment was reorganized, it contained only six companies. The 1st was assigned to A. P. Hill’s, Kemper’s, and W. R. Terry’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It was active from Williamsburg to Gettysburg except when it was Longstreet at Suffolk. Later the unit was involved in the capture of Plymouth, the conflicts at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor, the Petersburg siege south and north of the James River, and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment lost twenty-two percent of the 140 engaged at Second Manassas, had 9 wounded at Fredericksburg, and had mor than half of the 209 at Gettysburg disabled. Its casualties were 12 killed and 25 wounded at Drewry’s Bluff, 1 killed and 77 wounded at Five Forks, and 40 captured at Sayler’s Creek. Only 17 surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Patrick T. Moore, F. G. Skinner, and Lewis B. Williams; Lieutenant Colonels William H. Fry and Frank H. Langley; and Majors John Dooley, William P. Mumford, George F. Norton, and William H. Palmer.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 350





Unit History – 5th North Carolina Infantry

12 05 2022

Was organized at Halifax, North Carolina, in July, 1861. Its companies were recruited in the counties of Cumberland, Gates, Johnston, Graven, Rowan, Bertie, Wilson, and Caswell. Ordered to Virginia, the regiment reached Manassas on July 19 and fought in the battle under General Longstreet. IN April, 1862, it had 460 effectives and during the war was brigaded under Generals Early, Garland, Iverson, and R. D. Johnston. It participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, then was involved in Early’s operations in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox Campaign. It had 180 men in action at Seven Pines, lost 10 killed, 22 wounded, and 4 missing during the Seven Days’ Battles, and had 4 killed and 37 wounded at Chancellorsville. The unit took 473 men to Gettysburg, losing more then half, and reported 16 disabled at Bristoe and 3 at Mine Run. It surrendered with 7 officers and 76 men of which 48 were armed. The field officers were Colonels Thomas M. Garrett and Duncan K. McRae; and Lieutenant Colonels John C. Badham, William J. Hill, Joseph P. Jones. John W. Lea, and Peter J. Sinclair.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 215-216





Unit History – 18th Mississippi Infantry

12 05 2022

Organized June, 1861, at Corinth, Mississippi, recruited its members in Yazoo, Coahoma, Madison, Soto, and Hinds counties. Ordered to Virginia, the unit fought at First Manassas under D. R. Jones, then was engaged at Leesburg. In April, 1862, it contained 684 effectives and served in General Griffith’s, Barksdale, and Humphrey’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 18th participated in many campaigns from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor including the operations at Chickamauga and Knoxville. It went on to fight with Early in the Shenandoah Valley and later around Appomattox. The unit reported 38 casualties at First Manassas, 85 at Leesburg, and 132 at Malvern Hill. Of the 186 engaged at Sharpsburg, forty-three percent were disabled. It had 18 wounded at Fredericksburg, 25 killed and 43 wounded at Chancellorsville, and 18 killed and 82 wounded of the 242 at Gettysburg. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and only 4 officers and 44 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels E. R. Burt and Thomas M. Griffin; Lieutenant Colonel Walter G. Kearney and William H. Luse; and Majors John H. Balfour, James C. Campbell, G. B. Gerald, and E. G. Henry.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 177-178





Unit History – 17th Mississippi

11 05 2022

Was organized in Corinth, Mississippi, in June, 1861 and soon moved to Virginia. The men were drawn from the counties of Pike, Chickasaw, Marshall, Quitman, Alcorn, Tishomingo, Panola, Grenada, and Benton. It fought under D. R. Jones at First Manassas and in April, 1862 contained 692 effectives. During the remainder of the war it served under Generals H. Cobb, Griffith, Barksdale, and Humphreys. After fighting at Leesburg, the 17th was active in the difficult campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Seven Pines to Cold Harbor, except when detached to Chickamauga and Knoxville. It was involved in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations and later the Appomattox Campaign. The regiment took 600 men to Leesburg and lost 2 killed and 9 wounded. It reported 15 killed and 92 wounded during the Seven Days’ Battles, 9 killed and 77 wounded of the 270 at Sharpsburg, 13 wounded at Fredericksburg, and 10 killed and 70 wounded at Chancellorsville. Of the 469 engaged at Gettysburg, forty-three percent were disabled. Many were lost at Sayler’s Creek, and only 3 officers and 62 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels Winfield S. Featherston, John C. Fizer, and William D. Holder; Lieutenant Colonel John McGuirk; and Majors William L. Duff, John M. Lyles, and Edward W. Upshaw.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 176-177





Unit History – 6th Louisiana Infantry

11 05 2022

Was organized in May, 1861 at Camp Moore, Louisiana. Its members were recruited in New Orleans and the parishes of Union, Sabine, Ouachita, St. Landry, and St. Bernard. Many of these men were of the newspaper trades and half were “Irishmen.” Ordered to Virginia, the regiment served under General Ewell at Fist Manassas, then was assigned to R. Taylor’s, Hays’, and York’s Brigade. After participating in Jackson’s Valley Campaign, it fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor. It continued the fight with Early in the Shenandoah Valley and later shared in the Appomattox operations. The 6th reported 66 casualties at Cross Keys and Port Republic, 47 during the Maryland Campaign, 12 at Fredericksburg, and 81 at Chancellorsville. It lost 43 killed and wounded at Second Winchester, and twenty-eight percent of the 218 at Gettysburg. There were 89 captured at Rappahannock Station. Only 4 officers and 48 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels William Monaghan, Isaac G. Seymour, and Henry B. Strong; Lieutenant Colonels Joseph HAnlon, Louis Lay, and Nat. Offutt; and Majors George W. Christy, Samuel L. James, William H. Manning, and Arthur McArthur, Jr.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 144





Unit History – 6th Alabama Infantry

10 05 2022

About 1,400 strong, was organized at Montgomery, Alabama, in May, 1861. Its twelve companies were recruited in the counties of Montgomery, Jackson, Autuaga, Lowndes, Russell, Macon, Henry, and Wilson. Ordered to Virginia, the unit was assigned to Rodes’, O’Neal’s, and Battle’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It was engaged in many conflicts from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, moved with Early to the Shenandoah Valley, and ended the war at Appomattox. In April, 1862, it contained 1,100 effectives. Subsequently, it lost fifty-nine percent of the 632 engaged at Seven Pines and reported 156 casualties at Sharpsburg and 161 at Chancellorsville. Of the 382 in the fight at Gettysburg, more than 50 percent were disabled. The regiment surrendered with 4 officers and 80 men. Its commanders were Colonels John B. Gordon and John L. Seibles; Lieutenant Colonels B. H. Baker, Augustus M. Gordon, George W. Hooper, J. N. Lightfoot, and J. J. Willingham; and Majors J. F. Culver, S. Perry Nesmith, and Walter H. Weems.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 8





Unit History – 5th Alabama Infantry

10 05 2022

Completed its organization at Montgomery, Alabama, in May, 1861, and proceeded to Virginia. Its companies were from the counties of Barbour, Clarke, Lowndes, Talladega, Dallas, Sumter, Monroe, Greene, and Pickens. At the battle of First Manassas, the 5th was part of General Ewell’s Brigade, but was not actively engaged. During the balance of the war it served under Generals Rodes, O’Neal, and Battle. The unit was prominent in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Cold Haror, then fought with Early in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox operations. During April, 1862, it had a force of 660 men, but lost 27 killed and 128 wounded at Seven Pines and forty-one percent of the 225 at Malvern Hill. The regiment reported 24 killed, 133 wounded and 121 missing at Chancellorsville, and of the 317 at Gettysburg, more than sixty percent were disabled. It surrendered with 4 officers and 53 men. The field officers were Colonels Josephus M. Hall, E. Lafayette Hobson, A. C. Jones, C. C. Pegues, and Robert E. Rodes; Lieutenant Colonel John T. Morgan; and Major Eugene Blackford.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 7





Unit History – 1st Company Richmond Howitzers

9 05 2022

Was accepted into Confederate service in June, 1861. Its members were recruited in Richmond. After taking part in the Battle of First Manassas, the unit joined the Army of Northern Virginia and served in H. C. Cabell’s Battalion. It participated in various conflicts from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, then was active int he Petersburg siege south and north of the James River and around Appomattox. This battery contained 90 men at Gettysburg and surrendered with 12 on April 9, 1865. Captains Edward S. McCarthy, William P. Palmer, and John C. Shields were in command.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 411