“Corporal Trim,” 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, On the Advance

23 11 2016

Our Army Correspondence – – No. 5.
———-

In Camp, four miles from Centreville,
Twelve miles from Manassas Junction,
Friday, July 19, 1861.

Dear Independent: I am writing under difficulties, first, there is not table or even a board to write on, so I write on the crown of my cap holding it in my lap, as I sit leaning against a stack of guns while the sweat runs down and drops off my beard. We started from Camp Sullivan, Tuesday the 16th inst., about noon, marched to Washington where we united with the Rhode Island Regiments, 1st and 2d, and the New York 71st with several companies of regulars and the U. S. Light Artillery. We began to feel good as we field across the long bridge and came insight of the extensive earth works which cover all the heights on the Virginia side near the bridge or at any point of crossing on the river. The troops at work on the entrenchments gave us cheer after cheer as we passed them and at a quick step and with right good will we pushed on into Old Virginia. About 10 in the evening we went into camp, spread our blankets, and slept sweetly without being disturbed. The next morning we were up at the dawn, and after hard bread and meat again resumed our march. A fight was in prospect at Fairfax, and as we drew near the renowned spot we got our men in order and marched on still and quiet, without music. Soon a long line of earth works came in sight on the brow of a hill, but instead of its belching forth shot and shell upon us as we filed through the narrow valley, all was still, and the grand fortification showed itself no more belligerent than any other big pile of dirt. Soon our men were upon the works, but not a single soldier of the ten or twelve thousand said to have been at this place could be seen, all had left. In a few moments more we found ourselves in Fairfax. That renowned depot of Southern troops looked about as lonesome as the fortifications, for nothing of the human kind could be seen save a few negroes, and now and then a woman or child peaking from the windows. We passed through the grand street of the town, consisting of six or eight buildings, into the Court House yard, where we stacked arms, and the command was given, rest! Thus we found ourselves in possession of Fairfax Court House, and all without firing a gun or shedding any thing but sweat which was poured out pretty freely to be sure. The Colonel and staff took possession of the Court House and our regimental colors were planted upon the roof in the midst of prolonged shouts.

We learned that the Southern troops left about two hours before our arrival. On visiting the deserted camps we found they must be left in the greatest haste, as much valuable property was left, provisions, clothing, blankets, tents, &c. The boys found revolvers and knives, a few matches, some rolls of dimes and quarters where they had been paying off &c. Nearly every one had some sort of trophy. In some places they left their breakfast all ready, table set, and the “hoe cake baked,” in other cases they had only got the dough mixed up ready for baking. – Flour meal, beef, pork, corn and other stores showed that food was abundant with the rebels. The men got so excited in the plunder of the camp that they did not respect private property as they should; where they learned any one was in the Southern interest they went in and helped themselves. As soon as the officers learned what was going on they at once stationed guards and put every man under arrest who was found plundering, and did all they could to prevent any outrage, but enough was done I fear to give us a bad name. The orders now are very strict and the greatest care is taken to have all private property respected.

Thursday, the 18th, we marched from Fairfax to this point, which is about four miles from Centreville, and the same distance from Bulls Run which is the strong position of the rebels for the protection of Manassas Junction. The day we got here three companies of the Massachusetts 1st got into an ambush and were badly cut up. The Boston Fusileers, a company of one hundred and one, had but twenty-one men reported up to noon to-day, and the other two companies suffered but not so severely. There is the greatest excitement among the troops, some 60,000 being encamped within four or five miles, all they ask is orders to go on and clean them out. Old Gen. Scott come out to-day and says he shall not permit a single life to be rashly thrown away, that more lives have been lost now than we needed to take the whole of Bull Run, Manassas Gap and all. Bull Run is a very important point to the Southerners, as they get all their water for the Manassas Gap Railroad and for the use of the troops at that station, from this same Bull Run. The rebel troops are stationed in a large wood and they have batteries erected all about, and the position is very strong to hold for a short time, and cannot well be taken without a risk of considerable loss. The cars from Richmond have been run night and day of late bringing on reinforcements. It is thought that no other stand will be made after Bull Run and Manassas Gap until we get to Richmond. The troops are terribly excited, it is fearful to see men with the tiger fully aroused in them. To-morrow we expect to go in on Bull Run in some way, but nothing can be known previous to orders.

Gen. Wilson (long Jim)* was here today with Hon. T. M. Edwards**. Gen. Wilson seems unable to leave us. God bless his great heart, how much I wish he was in his prime. I reckon he would not leave us as long as the war lasted. I don’t know as he will now. Our men are in good health. The climate is not going to kill us. We are all right in that direction.

Ever yours,

CORPORAL TRIM.***

Concord Independent Democrat, 7/25/1861

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*Likely Congressman James Wilson. Sketch of General James Wilson of New Hampshire

**Likely Congressman Thomas M. Edwards Wikipedia 

***No individual named Trim is listed in the company roster, so this is likely a pseudonym.

A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





“Juvenis,” Battery A (Reynolds), 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, On the Battle and Retreat

22 11 2016

Army Correspondence.

Camp near Harper’s Ferry, Aug. 5th, 1861.

Mr. Editor: – I hope you have not thought that, because I have not contributed lately to your paper I was among the fallen at the battle of Bull Run. True, I was in that battle, and in the thickest of the fight for five long hours; but no missile of death was allowed by my Heavenly Father to strike me down. Members of my own company and of my own mess fell at my side, the shells burst at my feet, the spent musket balls struck me, but I am still unscathed, ready for another conflict with my country’s enemies; ready for the life long conflict with the enemy of souls, ready I hope to proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ to lost men.

It seems strange to me, that even the presence of death has no effect upon the minds of men. One can still hear the same coarse jests, the same profane language, the same taunts at those who speak to them of religion, as before they were surrounded by the dead and dying.

We are now encamped in a lovely place; the mountains of the Blue Ridge are on every side except where the Potomac winds through them. We have taken the 1st R. I. Battery, as their time is up, and our battery with the exception of one piece, was lost at the battle of Bull Run. Perhaps your readers would like to have a short account of that battle, which was one of the bloodiest in American history.

We were encamped between Fairfax and Centerville, and expected to remain there for some time. We had built our huts of branches, our fire places and cranes were ready for use. Sunday morning at on o’clock the bugle sounded, and the battery was harnessed up. We mounted the boxes and silently wound along the road towards Manassas Junction. There was no music, no loud command; our General wished to steal a march on the enemy. We were confident of victory, as we had confidence in our commander. We took a circuitous path through the woods, and without once having halted during the march of twelve miles, we reached the field of battle. The Rhode Island troops had the right of the line, the 2nd regiment in advance, the 1st next in order with our battery between. The first notice we had of the presence of the enemy was the volley of musketry from the woods upon our lines. The 2d regiment charged and drove them from the woods, down the hill. We were instantly ordered into action. We got into battery as quickly as possible and engaged a battery about a third of a mile from us. We soon silenced that and engaged the enemy in other parts of the field. The battle grew hotter and hotter – thicker and thicker flew the bullets, the shot, the shell. Our horses suffered severely, our men at the guns were entirely exhausted, wounded or dead. We were so thirsty that we threw ourselves into the mudy brooks and eagerly swallowed the mud and water. The enemy were retreating on every hand. Already Beauregard had sent a dispatch to Richmond, and even while we were fighting, Jeff Davis was packing up his State papers to send them to a place of safety. Bu all day there had been a constant stream of reinforcements pouring into the woods where the rebels had their head quarters. All at once the celebrated black horse cavalry charged upon us, their fresh infantry poured their volley into our ranks, their masked batteries opened upon our flank; thick as hail the shot flew; four hundred of the Zouaves were cut down. We retreated. We ran before that stream of lead and iron. No man could stand such a fire as that. The retreat became a rout; all were mingled together in dire confusion; the road was crowded with fugitives; the wounded, the wearied all rushed along together. We brought our battery off the field, and dozens of wounded men climbed upon our boxes and pieces, some with broken arms, some with broken legs, some with the blood flowing down their faces, some with their clothes red with blood. We were obliged to leave many a poor wounded, dying man who beseechingly begged us to take him upon our boxes. Those that were free from wounds were panic struck. At the least alarm every man almost would flee for his life, not knowing where he went. Thus we passed slowly along. We came out of those long woods, the dust in the road was so thick that nothing before us could be seen. We began to hope that the enemy would not disturb us, for now we had reached the direct road to Centerville, and our reserve was two or three miles before us. It began to grow dusky, for the thick dust and the woods on either side of the road hid the setting sun; all at once into that dense mass of men, horses and wagons, the enemy from a masked battery poured their shell; the musketry opened upon them; their cavalry charged upon them. What a scene! We were just at the bridge, but upon it was piled the government baggage wagons. We could not pass with our battery; for it was a narrow bridge, and there were deep gullies on each side. Our drivers cut the traces, we left the wounded men to save our own lives, and helter skelter we dashed on towards Centerville. The cavalry of the enemy charged upon us, and many a poor soldier fell before their sabres. We soon met the reserve coming up under Colonel Miles, but still we hurried on through that long dark night; morning dawned, and still we had not halted; Washington and the long bridge hove in sight, and we sank down upon the ground exhausted! for we had eaten nothing since Saturday. We had marched ten or twelve miles to the battle field without halting, we had fought through that hot day, we had marched nearly forty miles from the battle field to Washington. Thus we fought, thus we retreated.

I will not say upon whose head a terrible retribution should be visited. We long for an opportunity to wipe off the disgrace of that day.

O! how much pleasanter we spent the hours of the last Sabbath (the 4th inst.) Though separated from our regiment, we had religious services. We repaired to a huge pile of rocks shaded by tall trees, and there one of our number preached to to us the gospel of Christ. It seemed lik a heaven below.

Juvenis.*

Boston Christian Era, 8/16/1861

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*In Latin, Juvenis is a young man or a youth. The root of juvenile.

The History of Battery A, First Regiment Rhode Island Light Artillery

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Image: Surgeon George H. Hubbard, 2nd New Hampshire Infantry

21 11 2016

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Surgeon George H. Hubbard and Staff, A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry





Surgeon George H. Hubbard, 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, Casualty List for the Regiment

21 11 2016

List of Killed, Wounded, and Missing of the N. H. Second Regiment

———-

Dr. George H. Hubbard, Surgeon of the Second N. H. Regiment furnishes to the Manchester Mirror the following list of the killed, wounded and missing of that Regiment. He writes under date of July 27th:

Mr. John B. Clark – Dear Sir: – The following is a list of the killed, wounded and missing of the 2d N. H. Regiment, as far as at present ascertained. Some of the missing will very likely turn up alive:

KILLED.

John L. Rice, Co. A; Pat Kearns, Frank A. Eastman, Henry Tebbets, George Langtree, Co. H; Harvey Holt, Henry L. Morse, Co. I.

WOUNDED.

Col. Gilman Marston, right arm broken by a musket ball; Capt. Hiram Rollins, musket ball through top shoulder; Isaac W. Derby lost left arm, Daniel W. Whittein wounded in leg, Co. A; Jos. Ayer wounded in leg, John F. Lord wounded in head, Stephen Deshan, wounded slightly in breast, John O. Hayes wounded slightly in head, James M. Venner wounded slightly in head, Co. D; C. J. Marshall w. in foot (left a prisoner), W. F. Oxford w. in leg do., Oliver F. Allen w. in breast do., Co. K; Wm. H. Quimby, w. in leg and left a prisoner, Lewis N. Relation w. in leg do., Josiah Burleigh w. in arm do., Andrew M. Connell w. in head do., Alfred W. Berhan w. in breast, in Alexandria hospital, F. F. Wetherbee, w. in leg and left a prisoner, Co. C; Andrew J. Straw w. in leg, John Straw wounded in the leg, Hugh Lewis wounded in breast, Thomas Finnegan w. in breast, James B. Silver w. in arm Co. H; Henry M. Gordon w. in hand, Wm. Haley w. in wrist, Jos. C. Meserve w. in hand, W. H. Morrill w. in hand, Wm. H. H. Story w. in hand, Co. E; Charles Buck w. in shoulder (at Alexandria), Geo. S. Chase, w. fingers, Chas. H. Chase w. fatally in thigh and left prisoner, Cyrus W. Merrill do., do., W. H. F. Staples w. in arm, S. R. Tibbetts w. in hand, Co. F; Henry A. Bowman foot shot off and left a prisoner, Nelson Hurd badly wounded and left a prisoner, John Hagan w. in the side, Daniel Aldrich w. in left shoulder, Co. G; Frank K. Wasley w. in fingers, L. P. Hubbard w. in fingers, Chas. F. Lawrence w. in head, Co. I; Chas. Holmes w. in shoulder, Charles Cooper w. in thigh, left prisoner, Co. B.

Co. B – Charles Wilkins wounded in shoulder; Charles Hammond, wounded in hip; Wells C. Haynes, severely wounded in thigh – missing.

MISSING.

George S. Heaton, Dana S. Jaquith, Charles Sebastian, George H. Whitman, John F. Wheeler, of Co. A; Jacob Hall, H. H. Emerson, Alden T. Kidder, A. D. Leathers, Henry West, Christy L. Jones, of Co. D; Charles Ridge, Samuel Adams, Geo. Sawyer, Jr., of Co. K; F. R. Tucker, Kimball Ball, John Davis, Thurlow A. Emerson, John A. Barker, Elbin Lord wounded, Woodbury Lord wounded, Wm. H. Walker wounded, Wm. H. Connor wounded, Heman Allen, Louis G. Barker, Galen A. Grout, Samuel M. Joy, Timothy Saxton, of Co. A; Levi W. Colbath, Simeon M. Heath, Joseph R. Morse, of Co. E; L. W. Brackett, Geo. L. Dow, of Co. F; Alonzo B. Balley, of Co. G; Moses L. Eastman wounded, A. R. Robinson, John Berry, Albert Hall, Reuben F. Stevens of Co. I; Charles H. Perry, Thomas E. Barker, Wyman Holden, Hery Moore, John L. Fitz, George H. Clay, George C. Emerson of Co. B.

Col Marston is doing well – expect to save his arm. We lost all we carried on to the field, except instruments.

Our ambulances were fired on by cannon during the retreat, and we were forced to leave them and run for our lives.

Yours Truly,

Geo. H. Hubbard

Concord Democrat, 8/1/1861

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A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry 

George H. Hubbard at Rootsweb

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Pvt. John. W. Odlin, Co. B, 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, On the Campaign

20 11 2016

Letter from the 2d New Hampshire Regiment.

———-

Camp Sullivan, July 25, 1861.

Dear Friends: – I am just recovered from my fatigue of yesterday and the few preceding days to write a connected account of what I have done and seen; but if I were to picture the scenes fully and accurately, the recital would fill a volume. We started Tuesday at 1 1/2 o’clock P. M. and marched into the “Old Dominion.” After a walk of about 10 miles we camped upon the ground: and on the next morning receiving orders, we marched about 10 miles more to Fairfax, which had been evacuated about two hours before. We had to clear the road of trees and stones placed to blockade it, and passed some formidable fortifications, also deserted. That night we slept under the shadow of the Court House, from which the flag of our regiment waved in place of a “Secesh” which was pulled down by Capt. Barker of Co. A. Early upon the next morning we started off again and encamped about 1 mile this side of Centreville, where a skirmish had taken place the day before. Here we slept two nights, and upon Sunday morning at 2 o’clock we again proceeded in the direction of the enemy, and after a tedious tramp of 10 or 12 miles outflanked them, and then the battle commenced. I suppose you have seen accounts of it and the unfortunate panic which was the sole cause of our retreat and defeat. We were ordered first into an open field on the right hand, just opposite a battery of the enemy, and a large body of infantry drawn up in line of battle, and without firing a shot were exposed to their galling fire. The cannon balls flew whistling by – shells burst over our heads – and the rifle and musket bullets flew just like hail. Here we did not lose many men, for the shots were mostly too high; and soon Lt. Col. Fiske took up the line of march for the other side of the road which intersected the field of battle, where we were in some measure protected by the guns of the Rhode Island Battery. Here the work of death in our ranks commenced, and a private in Co. H. was the first to fall, struck by a bullet in the temple, causing instantaneous death; and then in quick succession began to fall, the New Hampshire boys. – Our regiment was then marched, with the others composing the brigade, nearer the enemy, when they dealt as good as they received. The Goodwin Rifles and the Abbot Guards of Manchester, Co. I. together went up to within forty rods of a house which stood in the midst of their entrenchments and shot down the Secession flag twice, being all the time exposed to one of the terrible masked batteries, which were the only drawbacks to our victorious progress. Things went on quite favorably to our side till that unfortunate panic took place among our teamsters, (not our regimental ones,) but the army wagoners who commenced to drive pell mell towards this city – in some cases cutting the traces and mounting the horses, and riding as for dear life.

This fright was of course communicated to the soldiers and the retreat commenced in the utmost disorder, wagons, soldiers straggling along, artillery piece by piece, and ambulances filled to their brims with the wounded hurrying along, their inmates making the night hideous with their groans and cries, all conspired to make a scene which I shall never forget. At the bridge over Bull Run where we cut off to flank the enemy, the rear of the retreating column was fired upon by a rifled cannon which killed one or two horses of the R. I. Battery and caused the guns to pile up in an inextricable mass, cutting off some of the wagons and making a confusion altogether beyond the power of words to describe. They made no other attack, at least no organized one, although they may have harrassed our men some with cavalry.

In this way we came to the city, where we arrived all the way from 1 o’clock Monday A. M. till now; and all the men are not here yet. The N. Y. 69th and the Ellsworth Zouaves are the worst cut up, having made several charges upon the batteries of the enemy.

The Zouaves made 3 or 4 charges, which were never equalled in the annals of war. They were attacked by 600 Rebel “Black Horse” Cavalry and they killed or dismounted every one but six, capturing hundreds of splendid army revolvers, which they gave freely to all around them on the retreat; and they took a strong battery of rifled guns by a most splendid movement, but owing to overpowering numbers were obliged to relinquish it.

Our own company was not idle during the engagement, for our rifles told with the most deadly effect upon their ranks, and our boys charged up to the banks near the hill followed by Co. I., which I before mentioned, and from behind the fences picked them off fast.

Our Captain behaved gallantly throughout the whole affair, as did our Lieutenant – the latter taking as he did the place of our lamented Walker, was true to his memory, and acted with a coolness which throws lustre upon his character. Both of our officers proved themselves men, and worthy of the cause in which they are engaged. Col. Marston was wounded in the arm but notwithstanding that, he was again upon the field commanding his men in person.

Our regiment is quite fortunate, only 25 or 30 missing. Some of our Company have not yet come in. Holden of West Concord, Haynes, son of Sheriff Haynes, Fitts and Emerson of Candia, and Clay of the same place. The tree latter are probably only prisoners at the worst. Charley Cooper was wounded in the thigh, not dangerous, who with one or two others, some of whom are mentioned above, are all of our Company injured.

The scene on the field I will not attempt, as imagination can picture it much more like reality. But we are thankful that we are no worse off, and shall soon be ready to tackle them again under better circumstances.

J. W. O.*

Concord Democrat, 8/1/1861

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*The only J. W. O. in the roster is Private John W. Odlin of Co. B. The members of his company named are also in the Goodwin Rifles, Co. B.

John W. Odlin at Fold 3 

A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry 

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Image: Maj. Josiah Stevens, Jr., 2nd New Hampshire Infantry

19 11 2016
josiah-stevens

Maj. Josiah Stevens, Jr., 2nd NH Infantry, Courtesy of David Morin





Major Josiah Stevens, Jr., 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, On the Battle

19 11 2016

Letter from Maj. Stevens.

—————

We are permitted to make the following extract from a letter of Maj. Josiah Stevens, Jr., of the Second Regiment, to his father, Col. Josiah Stevens, of this city, dated –

Washington, July 23, 1861.

I am, as you see, once more in Washington, having, as you are aware, seen a battle. We started at 2 A. M., on Sunday morning, from our camp ground, and made a march of 9 miles without anything except hard bread to eat, and at about 10 1-2 o’clock the ball opened. We came upon the enemy upon an eminence that commanded the whole country, with 60,000 men and 150 pieces of cannon. Our force consisted of 18,000 men and 20 pieces of cannon. We fought until 5 P. M., and found it impossible to capture the place.

They showered upon us a complete hailstorm of shot and shell, and wept whole platoons at a time, but our men steadily advanced. Our brigade was the first upon the field, and our regiment the last to leave it. Col. Marston was shot in the right shoulder before we had been fighting twenty minutes. I was within ten feet of him when he fell, and thought him shot dead. – I could not render him any assistance, as I had so much to look after. None of the Concord boys are killed. Charles Cooper was shot through the leg. Sergeant Holmes, of Griffin’s Riflemen, was severely wounded in the shoulder. We have not got the returns made yet, so as to know our exact loss.

We lost our battery and Griffin’s battery was close to us. He continued to fire until he had but one horse left out of 100, and not men enough to move the gun ten feet. Wm. Collier, formerly of Concord, got upon the last horse and rode him off. Bill fired the cannon, and in less than a second a cannon ball struck the hub of the wheel and knocked it into the air. Bill sprang to the limber, unhitched the only living horse, and left. You will see in the papers the reports of the killed and wounded nearer than I can write you now. It was the first time we ever stood under fire, and we had a pretty good chance to try our nerves, as we were exposed for 6 hours. The men stood up to the rack splendidly, and were ready to go into anything. It was a most painful sight to go in the rear of the line and see the dead and wounded, and one which we shall soon not forget. Men were mutilated in every conceivable way. We started from our camp at 2 A. M. on Sunday, marched nine miles, fought six hours and marched back to Washington, a distance of 34 miles, without scarcely anything to eat and miserable water to drink – Statesman.

Manchester Weekly Union, 7/30/1861

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Josiah Stevens, Jr., at Find A Grave.com 

Josiah Stevens, Jr., at Ancestry.com 

A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry 

Contributed by John J. Hennessy