Bull Runnings Artillery Tour This Saturday!!

18 10 2018

It’s time! Our First Bull Run Artillery Tour with Craig Swain and your humble host is this Saturday. Just a few quick reminders, nothing new.

  • We meet at 9:00 AM at the Manassas National Battlefield Park visitor’s center parking lot. I think we’ll find each other OK.
  • The forecast looks pretty good, mid-60s and overcast. There’s a chance of AM showers, though it looks OK for most of the day. Be sure to bring rain gear, but again, umbrellas are discouraged.
  • Dress appropriately – hiking boots will make you happy. Bring water. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. And don’t forget to pack a lunch.

I’m looking forward to seeing you on Saturday!





Bull Runnings Artillery Tour “Handouts”

15 10 2018

 

Here are Craig Swain’s handouts for our tour this Saturday, Oct. 20. Print them out, download them to a device, or ignore them. It’s your decision.

Order of Battle

Timeline

Really Important Stuff





Preview – Rasbach, “I Am Perhaps Dying”

8 10 2018

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I Am Perhaps Dying: The Medical History of Spinal Tuberculosis Hidden in the Civil War Diary of LeRoy Wiley Gresham, by Dennis Rasbach, MD, FACS, is a companion to Jan Croon’s The War Outside My Window, also from Savas Beatie. As the subtitle states, this is the back story of Gresham’s likely ailments, described but not diagnosed in the pages of his diary. This is a profusely illustrated work of 109 pp, plus a bibliography and index.  Footnotes are bottom-of-page.

The bulk of the text is Chapter 12 (55 pp.), which uses dozens of diary entries which, “together with medical commentary, can be understood in context with how LeRoy was experiencing his disease and injury.”

The other eleven chapters are broken down into historical diagnoses and the history of spinal tuberculosis and LeRoy’s treatment and suffering.

Dennis Rasbach is the author of Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the Petersburg Campaign, and a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.





Preview – Cashin, “War Stuff”

4 10 2018


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New from Cambridge University Press is War Stuff: The Struggle for Human and Environmental Resources in the American Civil War, by Joan E. Cashin. We’ve often read of the Civil War being one of resources: specifically, the Union had more, and the outcome was, in that regard, inevitable, a question of time. In this work, Cashin, a history professor at THE Ohio State University takes a look at the mechanics of marshalling those resources (including not just the civilians, but their skillsets), and the human impact of that process. From the introduction:

This book focuses on attitudes toward resources, both human and material, and the wartime struggle for resources between soldiers and civilians.

You get:

  • 171 pp. of narrative
  • 24 illustrations
  • 35 pp. of endnotes
  • 35 pp. bibliography, including 86 different archives and manuscript collections.

This looks interesting to me. It does seem to focus heavily on the Confederacy, but given where the bulk of operations occurred and where the impact on day to day life was most severe, that’s understandable.





Preview – Herdegen,”The Union Soldier in the American Civil War”

2 10 2018

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New from Savas Beatie is Lance Herdegen’s The Union Soldier in the American Civil War. This slim (154 pp) tome is touted as a “quick reference guide” to all things Billy Yank, and is divided into 34 chapters of varying focus. A sampling:

  • A Concise Timeline of the Civil War
  • Organization of the Union Army
  • Camp Life
  • Hardtack, Pork and Coffee
  • The Wounded and the Dead
  • Church and Faith
  • Discipline and Good Order
  • Load in Nine Counts
  • United States Colored Troops
  • Prisoners of War
  • Researching Your Union Ancestor
  • Civil War Points of Interest

This is a handy guide that should be useful for the newcomer, but seasoned CW consumers will find it of interest as well.

You can read my interview with Lance Herdegen on an earlier work, The Iron Brigade in History and Memory, right here.





Preview – Gottfried, “The Maps of Fredericksburg”

30 09 2018


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The latest in Savas Beatie’s fine atlas series is The Maps of Fredericksburg: An Atlas of the Fredericksburg Campaign, Including all Cavalry Operations, September 18, 1862 – January 22, 1863, by Bradley Gottfried. I’ve previewed a all of these here before, and worked closely with the author and publisher on their First Bull Run volume.

This volume starts off as the Union and Confederate armies recover and maneuver after the Battle of Antietam, and carries all the way through the failure of Burnside’s Mud March. The layout is the same: text on the left hand page, map on the facing, right hand page – 124 maps in all. Also included are orders of battle, end notes, a full bibliography, and an index.





Preview – Schmidt & Barkley, “September Mourn”

29 09 2018

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September Mourn: The Dunker Church at Antietam Battlefield, by Alann Schmidt and Terry Barkley, is a book that I have been anxiously anticipating due to a familial connection. My great-grandmother Smeltzer’s brother, Pvt. James Gates of the 8th Pennsylvania Reserves, was mortally wounded on September 17th, 1862, as he and his regiment moved south towards the Dunker Church outside Sharpsburg, Maryland. Prior to the war, however, he came down from his home in Bedford County, PA, to Sharpsburg and hired himself out to local farmers to assist with the harvest. One of those farmers who hired him was David Long, an Elder of the Dunker (German Baptist Brethren) Church. In fact, if a comrade’s recollections can be trusted, James had struck up a romance with one of the Long daughters, making the circumstances of his wounding and death all the more tragic.

While my great-great-uncle (or great-granduncle, depending on who you ask) and his story did not make it into this book, there is plenty on Elder Long, and plenty else to make this chronicle of one of the war’s most iconic structures worth your time. This history of the Church and its influence in the Sharpsburg community from its founding in 1853, through the battle and afterward, to its destruction and eventual restoration is thoroughly researched and engagingly told.

Schmidt is a former Antietam National Battlefield ranger and a pastor. Barkley is a former archivist and museum curator, and was the director of the Brethren Historical Library and Archives at the Church of the Brethren General Offices.