Obituary – Lt. Col. Benjamin J. Johnson

11 04 2022

Obituary.

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Lieut. Col. Benj. J. Johnson

Lieut. Col. Benjamin J. Johnson, the second in command of the Hampton Legion, is a native of the town of Beaufort, S. C., and was about forty-five years of age at the period of his death. His brothers reside in this State – two of whom are clergymen of the Episcopal Church – one, the Rev. Rich’d Johnson, being the Chaplain of Hampton’s Legion.

Col. Johnson was educated at Williamsburgh, Virginia, and commenced life as a planter; but afterwards studied law with Col. DeTreville, and came to the bar of Beaufort, where he practiced a few years. During his residence in Beaufort he commanded the 12th Regiment of Infantry, and was highly esteemed as an officer.

In 1838, when barely eligible in years, he was elected a member of the House of Representatives from St. Helena Parish, where he served many years, until he was transferred to the Senate by the same constituency. Col Johnson served in the Senate for two terms, and until his removal to Christ Church Parish, about three years ago. Immediately upon his removal he was elected a member of the House of Representatives from the election district of Christ Church, and continued a member to the time of his death.

Col. Johnson’s career in the Legislature was marked by attention and intelligence. He frequently filled the position of Chairman of important committees, and was known as a working member. He participated fully in the debates of both Houses, and was always distinguished by fairness and ability in his mode of conducting them. He filled a high position in the politics of the State, as evidenced by the prominence of his name in the late election for Governor of South Carolina. His heart was always true to the honor of his State, as evidenced by the prominence of his name in the late election for Governor of South Carolina. His heart was always true to the honor of his State, as exhibited throughout his life and illustrated by his death.

Col. Johnson’s influence was largely owing to his personal characteristics. A man of strong will, strong temper, bold, self-reliant, imperturbable, energetic, he at once impressed upon those with whom he was thrown in contact, his thorough manhood. He won friends in the closest ties of regard and affection, In his life he sustained the measure of a Carolina gentleman, and in his death he has added to it that of the patriot.

The Charleston (SC) Mercury, 7/23/1861

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