Unit History – 33rd Virginia Infantry

31 05 2022

Was organized during the early summer of 1861 with men from the counties of Hampshire, Shenandoah, Frederick, Hardy, Page, and Rockingham. IT became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under T. J. Jackson, R. B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J. A. Walker, and W. Terry. The regiment was active at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson’s Valley Campaign. Later it participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, then it moved with Early to the Shenandoah Valley and fought in numerous conflicts around Appomattox. The unit lost 45 killed and 101 wounded at First Manassas, and there were 59 disabled of the 275 engaged at First Kernstown. It sustained 33 casualties at Malvern Hill, 15 at Cedar Mountain, 105 at Second Manassas, 19 in the Maryland Campaign, and 66 at Chancellorsville. Twenty-three percent of the 236 at Gettysburg were killed, wounded, or missing. Only 1 officer and 18 men surrendered. the field officers were Colonels Arthur C. Cummings, Frederick W. M. Holliday, Edwin G. Lee, John F. Neff, and Abraham Spengler; Lieutenant Colonels George Huston and John R. Jones; and Majors Jacob B. Golladay and Philip T. Grace.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 378-379





Unit History – 27th Virginia Infantry

31 05 2022

Was organized in May, 1861, and accepted into Confederate service in July. The men were from the counties of Alleghany, Rockbridge, Monroe, Greenbrier, and Ohio. It contained only eight companies and became part of the famous Stonewall Brigade. During the war it served under the command of General T. J. Jackson, R. B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J. A. Walker, and W. Terry. The 27th fought at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson’s Valley Campaign. It then participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, moved with Early to the Shenandoah Valley, and was active around Appomattox. The regiment reported 141 casualties at First Manassas, 57 at First Kernstown, and 4 of the 136 engaged at First Winchester. It lost 3 killed at Cedar Mountain, had 4 killed and 23 wounded at Second Manassas, and sustained 9 killed and 62 wounded at Chancellorsville. Of the 148 in action at Gettysburg about thirty percent were disabled. Only 1 officer and 20 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels John Echols, James K. Edmondson, William W. Gordon, and A. J. Grigsby; Lieutenant Colonels Charles L. Haynes and Donald M. Shriver; and Majors Philip F. Frazer and Elisha F. Paxton.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 375-376





Unit History – 5th Virginia Infantry

31 05 2022

Was organized in May, 1861, under Colonel K. Harper. Eight companies were from Augusta County and two from Frederick County. The unit became part of the Stonewall Brigade, and served under Generals T. J. Jackson, R. B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J. A. Walker, and W. Terry. It saw action at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson’s Valley Campaign. Later the 5th participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, then was active in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations and around Appomattox. It reported 9 killed, 48 wounded, and 4 missing at First Kernstown, had 4 killed, 89 wounded, and 20 missing at Cross Keys and Port Republic, and suffered 14 killed and 91 wounded at Second Manassas. The unit sustained 120 casualties at Chancellorsville and of the 345 engaged at Gettysburg, sixteen percent were disabled. It surrendered 8 officers and 48 men. The field officers were Colonels William S. H. Baylor, John H. S. Funk, William H. Harman, and Kenton Harper; Lieutenant Colonel Hazel J. Williams; and Majors Absalom Koiner and James W. Newton.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 357





Unit History – 4th Virginia Infantry

30 05 2022

Was assembled at Winchester, Virginia, in July, 1861. Its companies were from the counties of Wythe, Montgomery, Pulaski, Smyth, Grayson, and Rockbridge. It became part of the Stonewall Brigade, and served under Generals T. J. Jackson, R. B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J. A. Walker, and W. Terry. The regiment fought at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson’s Valley Campaign. It then participated in many conflicts of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, was with Early in the Shenandoah Valley, and saw action around Appomattox. The unit reported 5 killed, 23 wounded, and 48 missing at First Kernstown, took 317 effectives to Port Republic, had 7 killed and 25 wounded at Malvern Hill, and had 19 killed and 78 wounded of the 180 at Second Manassas. It lost forty-eight percent of the 355 engaged at Chancellorsville and more than fifty percent of the 257 at Gettysburg. The regiment surrendered with 7 officers and 38 men of which only 17 were armed. The field officers were Colonels James T. Preston, Charles A. Ronald, and William Terry; Lieutenant Colonels Robert D. Gardner and Lewis T. Moore; and Albert G. Pendleton.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 355-356





Unit History – 2nd Virginia Infantry

29 05 2022

Was assembled at Charles Town in April, 1861, then moved to Harper’s Ferry to seize the armory. The unit was accepted into Confederate service in July. Its companies were from the counties of Clarke, Frederick, Floyd, Jefferson, and Berkeley. It became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under Generals T. J. Jackson, R. B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J. A. Walker, and W. Terry. The 2nd fought at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson’s Valley Campaign. It went on to fight with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor except during the Maryland Campaign when it was detached to Martinsburg as provost guards. Later the unit was involved in Early’s operations in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox operations. It reported 90 casualties at First Kernstown, 25 at Cross Keys and Port Republic, 27 at Gaines’ Mill, and 77 at Second Manassas. The regiment lost 2 killed and 19 wounded at Fredericksburg, had 8 killed and 58 wounded at Chancellorsville, and had about eight percent of the 333 engaged at Gettysburg disabled. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 9 officers and 62 men, Its field officers were Colonels James W. Allen, Lawson Botts, and John Q. A. Nadenbousch; Lieutenant Colonels Raleigh R. Colston, Francis Lackland, and William W. Randolph; and Majors Francis B. Jones, Edwin L. Moore, and Charles H. Stewart.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 352





Unit History – Purcell Light Artillery

28 05 2022

Completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia, in Apri, 1861. The unit was assigned to R. L. Walker’s and W. J. Pegram’s Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia. It participated in many campaigns from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, was involved in the operations against Petersburg and Richmond, and saw action around Appomattox. The battery reported 7 killed and 53 wounded during the Seven Days’ Battles, and lost seven percent of the 89 engaged at Gettysburg. It was included in the surrender of April 9, 1865. It’s captains were George M. Cayce, William Pegram, and R. Lindsay Walker.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 410-411





Unit History – 2nd Tennessee Infantry PACS

27 05 2022

Was organized in May 1861, and mustered into Confederate service at Nashville, Tennessee, and mustered into Confederate service at Lynchburg, Virginia. Its members were recruited in the counties of Rutherford, Maury, Davidson, Bedford, Trousdale, Shelby, and Sumner. The unit was assigned to J. G. Walker’s and French’s Brigade, fought at Aquia Creek and First Manassas, then in February, 1862, returned to Tennessee. Later it was attached to Cleburne’s, L. E. Polk’s, Tyler’s, and Palmer’s Brigade. After fighting at Shiloh, Richmond, and Perryville, the regiment participated in the campaigns of the Army of Tennessee from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, then was involved in Hood’s Tennessee operations and the Battle of Bentonville. It lost thirty-seven percent of the 300 at Richmond, had 4 killed and 39 wounded at Murfreesboro, and of the 264 engaged at Chickamauga, more than sixty percent were disabled. The unit totalled 262 man and 146 arms in December, 1863, had 133 in action at Ringgold Gap, but could muster only 65 after the battle of Nashville. Few surrendered on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Colonels WIlliam B. Bate and William D. Robinson; Lieutenant Colonels John A. Butler, David L. Goodall, and William J. Hale; and Majors WIlliam R. Doak and William T. Driver.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 276





Unit History – 1st Arkansas Infantry

26 05 2022

Formed during the early spring of 1861, contained men from Union, Clark, Ouachita, Jefferson, Saline, Pulaski, Jackson, Arkansas, and Drew counties. Ordered to Virginia, the unit entered Confederate service at Lynchburg. It fought at First Manassas, moved to Tennessee, participated in the conflict at Shiloh, then took and active role in the Kentucky Campaign. Later it was assigned to General L. E. Polk’s and Govan’s Brigade and was prominent in many battles of the Army of Tennessee from Murfreesboro to Bentonville. The regiment reported 13 killed and 90 wounded at Murfreesboro, lost forty-five percent of the 430 engaged at Chickamauga, and totalled 302 men and 217 arms in December, 1863. During July, 1864, this unit was united with the 15th (Cleburne’s-Polk’s-Josey’s) Regiment and in the Battle of Atlanta lost 15 killed, 67 wounded, and 3 missing. Very few surrendered on April 16, 1865. The field officers were Colonels John W. Colquitt, and James F. Fagan; Lieutenant Colonels William A. Crawford, W. H. Martin, Donelson McGregor, James C. Monroe, and John B. Thompson; and Major Stinson Little.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 42





Unit History – 4th South Carolina Infantry

25 05 2022

Was organized at Anderson, South Carolina, in March, 1861 and soon moved to Virginia. It fought at First Manassas under N. G. Evans and reported 11 killed, 79 wounded, and 6 missing. In April, 1862, the unit totalled 450 men and that same month was consolidated into five companies and redesignated the 4th South Carolina Battalion. Its commanders were Colonel John B. E. Sloan, Lieutenant Colonel Charles S. Mattison, and Major James H. Whitner.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 253





Unit History – 1st Special Battalion Louisiana Infantry

24 05 2022

[Also called 2nd Infantry Battalion or Wheat’s Tigers] was formed at Camp Walker, near New Orleans, Louisiana, in May, 1861, with five companies. Most of the men were military adventurers who were experienced fighters. It moved to Virginia and saw action at First Manassas, then was assigned to R. Taylor’s Brigade and fought in Jackson’s Valley Campaign and later the Seven Days’ Battles. During the summer of 1862 the battalion disbanded. Its commanders were Majors Robert A. Harris and Chatham R. Wheat.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 140