President Jefferson Davis to Brig. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, Encouraging Cooperation with Beauregard

3 01 2021

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 985

Richmond, July 20, 1861.

General Joseph E. Johnston, Manassas Junction, Va,:

General: You are a general in the Confederate Army, possessed of the power attaching to that rank. You will know how to make the exact knowledge of Brigadier-General Beauregard, as well of the ground as of the troops and preparation, avail for the success of the object in which you co-operate. The zeal of both assures me of harmonious action.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.





Brig. Gen. Samuel Cooper to Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard on Withdrawal and Reinforcements

3 01 2021

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 983

Richmond, July 19,1861.

General G. T. Beauregard, Comdg., &c., Manassas Junction, Va.:

We have no intelligence from General Johnston. If the enemy in front of you have abandoned an immediate attack and General Johnston has not moved, you had better withdraw call upon him, so that he may be left to his full discretion. All the troops arriving at Lynchburg are ordered to join you. From this place we will send as fast as transportation permits. The enemy is advised at Washington of the projected movement of Generals Johnston and Holmes, and may vary his plans in conformity thereto.

S. COOPER,
Adjutant and Inspector General.





President Jefferson Davis to Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard on Reinforcements

31 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 981

Richmond, Va.,
July 18,1861.

General G. T. Beauregard:

McRae’s North Carolina regiment goes to you this evening; Barksdale’s Mississippi regiment goes to you from Lynchburg. Further re-enforcements have promise of transportation in the morning. Hampton’s Legion and others will go as soon as possible. God be praised for your successful beginning. I have tried to join you, but remain to serve you here, as most useful for the times.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.





Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard to Brig. Gen. Samuel Cooper, on Pending Attack of Enemy

31 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 980

Manassas, July 17,1861.

General Cooper:

I believe this proposed movement of General Johnston is too late. Enemy will attack me in force to-morrow morning.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.





Brig. Gen. Samuel Cooper to Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, Authorizing him to Appropriate the 11th [?] North Carolina Infantry

31 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 980

Richmond, July 17, 1861.

General G. T. Beauregard, Manassas Junction, Va.:

You are authorized to appropriate the North Carolina regiment on its route to General Johnston. If possible, send to General Johnston to say he has been informed, via Staunton, that you were attacked, and that he will join you if practicable with his effective force, sending his sick and baggage to Culpeper Court-House by rail or through Warrenton.

S. COOPER,
Adjutant and Inspector General.





President Jefferson Davis to Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard on Reinforcements

31 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 980

Richmond, Va., July 17,1861.

General G. T. Beauregard:

We are making all efforts to re-enforce you. Cannot send to-day, but afterwards they will go regularly daily, railroad permitting. Hampton’s Legion, McRae’s regiment, and two battalions, Mississippi and Alabama, under orders.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.





Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard to President Jefferson Davis on Increasing Enemy Forces on his Front

30 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 969

Manassas, July 9,1861.

President Davis:

Enemy’s force increasing, and advancing daily this side of Potomac. He will soon attack with very superior numbers. No time should be lost in re-enforcing me here with at least ten thousand men—volunteers or militia. I write to-day.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Brigadier- General, Commanding.





Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard to Sec. of War LeRoy Pope Walker, on Advance to Positions Forward of Bull Run

28 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 947

Headquarters
Army of the Potomac, Manassas Junction, Va., June 23, 1861.

Hon. L. P. Walker, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

Sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that, in consequence of the large re-enforcements I have lately received, I have divided my forces into six brigades, as per inclosed statement,* and commenced a forward movement to protect my advanced position at Centreville, Fairfax Court-House, and Sangster’s Cross-Roads, and also to be within striking distance of the enemy, whose advance positions seem to be at and to the rear of Falls Church (seven -miles from Alexandria), where they have five regiments (First and Second Connecticut, First and Second Ohio, and Sixty-ninth New York), one troop of cavalry, and one light battery. They have also four companies at Annandale.

My advanced forces (three brigades of three regiments each) occupy the triangle represented by Mitchell’s Ford (Bull Run), one regiment; Centreville and a point half way to Germantown, one brigade; Germantown and Fairfax Court-House, one brigade; at the crossing of Braddock’s old road with the Fairfax Court-House and Fairfax Station roads, one regiment; at the latter station, one regiment and one battalion, and at Sangster’s Cross-Roads, one battalion. All these positions are in easy and short communication with each other and with these headquarters. Most of my cavalry is with the advance, scouting, reconnoitering, &c. One light battery is at Fairfax Court-House with General Bonham’s brigade, and another is to be sent to Centreville to act with Colonel Cocke’s brigade. I unfortunately have none to spare for my other brigades. I have thrown eight miles in advance of the latter town or village one battalion of infantry and two companies of cavalry to observe the country towards the Potomac and the movements of the enemy in that direction. As already reported to the Department, one regiment (Sloan’s South Carolina) has been ordered to Leesburg, to assist Col. E. Hunton in the defense of that important position. I regret much my inability to send him some artillery.

I must call the attention of the Department to the great deficiency of my command in ammunition, not averaging more than twenty rounds in all per man. If I were provided with the necessary materials, molds, &c., I think I could establish here a cartridge manufactory which could supply all our wants in that respect. Could not a similar arrangement be made at all hospital depots, State arsenals, penitentiaries, &c.? To go into battle each soldier ought to be provided with at least forty rounds of cartridges, and not less than sixty rounds in reserve.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

*See General Orders, No. 20, p. 943





Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard to Col W. B. Bate, 2nd Tennessee Infantry, on Forwarding Troops to Brentsville

26 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 932-933

Headquarters Department of Alexandria, Va.,.
Manassas Junction, June 17, 1861.

Col. W. B. Bate,
Comdg. at Camp Jackson, Brooke’s Station, Stafford Co., Va.:

Colonel: As it would be important to re-enforce the troops under my command as soon as practicable should the enemy advance from Alexandria, I have to suggest that you obtain the approval of General Holmes and of the Secretary of War to your throwing forward your regiment (two would be preferable) and a battery to my support. A good position for them to occupy would be Brentsville, a few miles southeast of here, where they would protect my rear, and be prepared also to act against any force of the enemy attempting to land at Quantico Creek or even at Aquia Creek.

I have already informed General Holmes, through his aide, Colonel Lacy, of the necessity of establishing a battery and supporting force at the mouth of the former creek, but I am unable to do so at present for the reason given above; hence I would be happy to have him do it if in his power. I would suggest also the necessity of establishing immediately a telegraph station near your headquarters and another near those of Lieutenant-Colonel Green, at Camp Chopawamsic, near Evansport, so as to be in telegraphic communication with this place, via Richmond, for a most thorough and perfect concert of action must exist between our different military departments to insure victory to our arms and success to our glorious cause.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,
Brigadier- General, Commanding.

P. S.— What has become of the portable hot-shot furnace I sent to General Lee from Charleston for the defense of the Potomac? It ought to be at Aquia Creek. I beg you to send a copy of this letter, through General Holmes, to the Secretary of War, with such remarks as both may wish to add to it.

[Indorsement.]

Headquarters Department,
Brooke’s Station, June 18, 1861.

I disagree with General Beauregard as to the propriety of detaching any part of this command. The point designated by him is entirely out of reach of Aquia Creek. If this command is relieved, it should be on the supposition that there is no danger to be apprehended of an invasion from near here, and in that event nearly the whole command should be sent.

Respectfully forwarded.

TH. H. HOLMES,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Department.





President Jefferson Davis to Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, on Operational Options

22 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 922-923

Executive Department,
Richmond, June 13,1861.

General Beauregard, Comdg., &c., Manassas Junction, Va.:

My Dear General: Colonel Jones delivered to me your letter of the 12th instant,* and, as suggested by you, I conversed with him of the matters to which it related. Your information may be more accurate than we possess in relation to the purpose of the enemy, and I will briefly reply to you on the hypothesis which forms the basis of your suggestions.

If the enemy commences operations by attack upon Harper’s Ferry, I do not perceive why General Johnston should be unable, even before overwhelming numbers, to retire behind the positions where the enemy would approach him in reverse. It would seem to me not unreasonable to expect that before he reached Winchester, the terminus of the railroad in his possession, the people of the fertile and populous valley would rise in mass to aid him in repelling the invader. But suppose it should be otherwise, he could still, by retiring to the passes on the Manassas Railroad and its adjacent mountains, probably check the progress of the enemy, and prevent him from either taking possession of the valley or passing to the rear of your position. We hope soon to re-enforce you to an extent equal to the strength you require by the junction of General Johnston, and I cannot doubt but that you will agree with me that you would then be better circumstanced to advance upon Alexandria than if General Johnston, by withdrawing from the valley, had left the enemy the power to pass to your rear, to cut your line of communication, and advance to attack you in reverse while you were engaged with the enemy in front.

Concurring fully with you in the effect which would be produced by possession of Arlington Heights and Alexandria, if your rear is at the same time sufficiently covered, it is quite clear that, if the case should be otherwise, your possession, if acquired, would be both brief and fruitless.

To your request that a concerted plan of operations should be adopted, I can only reply that the present position and unknown purpose of the enemy require that our plan should have many alterations. I have noticed your converging lines upon Richmond, and it can hardly be necessary to remind you that we have not at this time the transportation which would enable us to move upon those lines as described. Should the fortune of war render it necessary to retire our advance columns, they must be brought mainly upon railroads, and that of Harper’s Ferry would come by your present position. It would therefore be a necessity that General Johnston’s columns should make a junction with yours before yours retired; but I have not anticipated the necessity of your retreat, and have struggled rather to increase your force, and look hopefully forward to see you enabled to assume the offensive. Had I been less earnestly engaged in providing for yours and other commands, I should have had the pleasure of visiting you before this date.

Two regiments have been sent forward, neither of which had reached you at the date of your letters, and you will soon receive further re-enforcements. They are not trained troops, but I think they are better than those of the enemy, and the capacity which you have recently exhibited successfully to fight with undisciplined citizens justifies the expectation that you will know how to use such force as we are able to furnish.

Very truly, yours,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

*Not found