Preview: Dunkerly, “To the Bitter End”

22 04 2015

51iUxctypFL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_If you read yesterday’s post and are looking to learn more about Bennett Place, you can find it in Robert M. Dunkerly’s To the Bitter End: Appomattox, Bennett Place, and the Surrenders of the Confederacy, new from Savas Beatie. This is part of the Emerging Civil War series, and as such follows a familiar format. Softcover, 169 pages of text, including seven maps, numerous illustrations, and five appendices. No index, however.

The bulk of the narrative takes the reader to Appomattox, then to Bennett Place, covering the movements of the armies and the mechanics of negotiation and surrender. It follows Jefferson Davis is his dash to…wherever he was dashing, and his eventual capture. Then the fall of Mobile and the surrender of Taylor to Canby; the end in the Trans-Mississippi at New Orleans (proxy Simon Buckner to proxy Peter Osterhaus); a few other lesser known capitulations; to the coup de grace in Indian Territory.

Appendices include The USCTs in the Appomattox Campaign, The Long Road Home from Appomattox, and The Surrender of the CSS Shenandoah.

Very cool and convenient to have summaries of all the surrenders in one place, with modern photos of the sites discussed. Handy.





On the Anniversary of the Surrender at Bennett Place

21 04 2015

This article ran in my Collateral Damage column in Civil War Times back in December, 2010, as Bennett Place, Where the War Really Ended. Click on the thumbnails for larger images I recorded over the years.

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Original road trace

Original road trace

The knock came unexpectedly at just about noon that sunny spring day, April 17, 1865. James Bennett and his wife, Nancy, opened the door to their modest three-room, two-story home and were greeted by Union Major General William T. Sherman and Confederate General Joseph Johnston, along with their staffs and escorts, several hundred soldiers in all. Johnston thought the farm which he had passed earlier looked like an appropriate place for them to sit down and talk and Sherman had deferred to his judgment. The Bennetts left their guests and repaired to their detached kitchen, leaving the two men in possession of the main room, which was described as “scrupulously neat, the floors scrubbed to a milky whiteness, the bed in one room very neatly made up, and the few articles of furniture in the room arranged with neatness and taste”. What followed was the first of three meetings between the army group commanders; three meetings that would end – after no little drama – with the surrender on April 26th of nearly 90,000 Confederate soldiers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.

353James Bennett (he would change the spelling from “Bennitt” after 1860: to avoid confusion the later spelling will be used here) was born in Chatham County, NC on July 11, 1806. In the 1820s he moved to Orange County, and on May 23, 1834 he married Nancy Leigh Pearson. The union produced three children: son Lorenzo in 1832, daughter Eliza Ann in 1834, and son Alphonzo in 1836. After years of struggling financially, in 1846 James was finally able to borrow $400 and purchase a 325 acre farm with an existing cabin along the Hillsboro Road outside Durham, NC, in eastern Orange County. They added siding to the cabin, and by 1854 James was able to pay off the loan, later selling 133 acres for $250.

Reconstructed Bennett Farm

Reconstructed Bennett Farm

James had several sources of income. He did some contract hauling; sold food, liquor and lodging to travelers on the Hillsboro Road; and made and sold shoes and clothing. But the family’s primary business was agriculture, and they grew corn which they both consumed and sold. The Bennett farm also produced cantaloupe, watermelon, oats, wheat, and sweet potatoes. Bennett owned no slaves, but hired helpers, including slaves, when he was able.

The war was hard on the Bennetts. Lorenzo, who had enlisted in the 27th NC, fell sick and died in a Winchester, VA army hospital in October 1862. Alfonso died that same year, though it isn’t clear if he died in military service. In August 1864 Eliza’s husband Robert Duke – a brother of Washington Duke for whom Duke University is named – of the 46th NC died of illness in a hospital in Lynchburg, VA. Soon after, Eliza returned to live at Bennett Place with her and Robert’s son, James.

Interior of reconstructed farm house

Interior of reconstructed farm house

When the “Terms of a Military Convention” were signed by Sherman and Johnston on April 26th, James Bennett was invited to join the generals and their staffs in a celebratory toast. Afterwards, a Union private offered to purchase the table cover on which the agreement had been signed, but Bennett refused. One reporter wrote that relic hunters were so thorough that there would soon be little left to indicate where the house stood.

Two days later, a detail from Kilpatrick’s cavalry division arrived and made Bennett an offer of $10 and a horse for the signing table and cover, with the caveat that they were under orders to take them if he declined the offer. Not surprisingly, he accepted, but despite turning over the table the payment never materialized. In 1870, after learning that the table had subsequently sold for $3,000, Bennett wrote to the governor of North Carolina seeking compensation for it and other items taken from his home, but to no effect. In 1873 he filed a claim with the Southern Claims Commission, but was denied restitution because he had supported the Confederacy.

While his land was spared the ravages of fighting, after the war the productivity of Bennett’s farm dropped off significantly. By 1875 sales of various parcels of his land left him with 175 acres, all of which he sharecropped out in early 1876. James Bennett died in 1879, followed not long after by his wife. By 1889 Eliza’s daughter Roberta Shields was the sole owner of the farm: she sold 35 acres including the house to Brodie L. Duke, a black-sheep son of Washington Duke, in 1890.

The chimney is all that remains of the original dwelling

The chimney is all that remains of the original dwelling

By the early 1900’s the farm was reported as deserted, the house in a state of severe 359disrepair. A protective structure was erected around the house in the latter half of the first decade of the 20th century. Richmond businessman Samuel T. Morgan purchased 31 acres and the house around 1908, but he died in 1920 before anything was done to preserve the structure. In 1921, the Surrender site burned to the ground under mysterious circumstances. All that remained was the stone chimney.

"Unity"

“Unity”

In 1923 a 3 ½ acre plot including the Surrender site and a new monument (Unity) was donated to a non-profit organization, The Bennett Place Memorial Commission, by the Morgan family in return for its promise to maintain the site in perpetuity. But while small improvements were made in the first decade, the site was relatively unvisited for more than 20 years. In 1961, Bennett Place became an official NC State Historic Site. The reconstructed house, kitchen, smokehouse and split rail fence lining the historic Hillsboro Road trace were dedicated, and Bennett Place’s life as a public historic landmark began. Today the site also includes a visitor center with theater, museum, and gift shop, the Everett-Thissen Research Library, and a bandstand.

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Thanks to Tonia Smith for her assistance in the preparation of this article. See Arthur C. Menius, James Bennitt: Portrait of an Antebellum Yeoman in The North Carolina Historical Review, October 1981 and the same author, The Bennett Place, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, July 1979





Memorial Day at Bennett Place

6 05 2011

Bennett Place, Durham, NC

I received the following from John Guss, the site manager at Bennett Place State Historic Site in Durham, NC:

This month we remember the American soldier with a special living history program at Bennett Place in Durham. We will have American soldiers/living historians from various time periods in American history, The American Revolution, American Civil War, Spanish-American War, WWII, and others.

Please join us as we honor the American soldier Saturday, May 28th, 10 am – 4 pm.

Thank you for supporting North Carolina State Historic Sites and our United States Military.

I wrote about Bennett Place in my Collateral Damage column for America’s Civil War a couple of issues ago, and I couldn’t have done it without John and my friend Teej. If you’re in that area, be sure to stop by.

See the event poster here.





Civil War Times December 2010

1 10 2010

Inside this issue:

Letters

  • One is not mad at Gary Gallagher, one is.  Of course, the one that is mad is mad because, as we all know, Slavery had nothing to do with the Civil War, and in fact saying it did have anything to do with it should never be allowed to appear in print.  Another is mad at Gallagher because he ranked George Thomas too low as the fourth greatest Union commander.   And still another is upset with Dana Shoaf for not hammering the great villain of the war, George McClellan, hard enough in his op-ed on Stanley McChrystal.  That reader should be pleased with America’s Civil War’s November issue in which Harold Holzer goes ape-shit on Mac’s ass.

News

  • Brandy Station expands.  Camp Lawton site found.

Departments

  • Blue & Gray – Gary Gallagher on what Union soldiers fought for.
  • Collateral Damage – Yours Truly on Bennett Place
  • Interview – Waite Rawls of the MOC
  • Field Guide – Chris Howland at 2nd Bull Run
  • Editor Letter – Dana Shoaf on the GBPA’s endorsement of the Gettysburg Casino

Features

  • General Disobedience – McClellan hatchetographer Edward Bonetopickemper’s hit piece on the centennial’s favorite punching bag.
  • Substitute for a Corpse – David Lowe & Philip Shiman on creative battlefield photography.
  • Joseph Whitworth’s Deadly Rifle – Fred Ray on the favorite weapon of Southern sharpshooters.
  • All Glory and No Gore – Doug Dammann on Elmer Ellsworth’s militia tour of 1860.  This is followed by a photo gallery of Ellsworth memorabilia.
  • Crisis of Faith – George Rable on spiritual revivals

Reviews

  • The USS Carondelet: A Civil War Ironclad in Western Waters, by Myron J. Smith, Jr.
  • Gentlemen Merchants: A Charleston Family’s Odyssey, 1828-1870, Philip N. Racine
  • Kilted Warriors: Music of the 79th New York Volunteer Infantry, 79th Regimental Band (CD)
  • Double Death: The True Story of Pryce Lewis, the Civil War’s Most Daring Spy, Gavin Mortimer
  • Plus a list of eleven books for the holidays.







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