Snake’s Eye View of First Bull Run

30 11 2013

19521v

Blogger Craig Swain brought this one to my attention. Go to the LOC for a high res TIFF image that is easier to read. Here’s the description:

Cartoon print shows Union troops after the Battle of Bull Run during the Civil War from the point of view of a copperhead, that is, a northern Democrat supporting Confederate troops. The image is keyed to eighteen points in the image: Beauregard’s headquarters, Jefferson Davis’ headquarters, Johnston’s headquarters, Elzy’s Maryland battery, General McDowell, General Tyler, The Bull’s Run, Fire Zouaves, New York 19th Regiment, Sherman’s battery, Ely member of Congress, barricade for member of Congress, Lovejoy & Company, Ladies as spectators, Riddle Brown & Company, Blenker’s Brigade, Senator Wilson, and the U.S. Dragoon. Includes numbered key.





The Most Interesting Blog In The World

29 06 2012

Thanks to Craig Swain:





Preview – Katz & Virga, “Civil War Sketch Book”

16 04 2012

The good folks at Norton sent me a copy of Civil War Sketch Book: Drawings from the Battlefront, by Harry L. Katz and Vincent Virga, a nice, big, coffee-table book (without legs). Inside is the work of newspaper correspondents (or “specials” for short) who covered the war from the front, including Alfred & William Waud, Frank Vizetelly, Winslow Homer, Thomas Nast, Arthur Lumley, Edwin Forbes, and many more. Arranged in chronological order, the narrative tells the story of the illustrators, how they did their work and the conditions under which they did it. The reproductions of sketches and finished etchings are a delight – Kindle for this makes little sense. The book is a tie-in to the May 2012 issue of National Geographic Magazine and its cover story, Bringing the Civil War to Life by Katz. Follow the link and find a nice gallery of sketches from the book.





Mint In the Box!

12 04 2012

Much was made recently of the decisions of the Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum and the Gettysburg National Military Park Visitor’s Center to sell a John Wilkes Booth bobblehead doll action figure in their gift shops, and the subsequent decisions of those entities to discontinue the sales of the item in the wake of a public outcry. I, of course, could not resist the opportunity to get one for my library. It came today. I think some of the earlier stories manipulated JWB by purposely tilting his wobbly noggin in such a way as to make him, somehow, more sinister in appearance. With his head on straight, he doesn’t look any crazier than Senator Jim Lane of Kansas.

In All His Assassinistic Glory!

Mint In the Box!

Did You Know?

A Teaching Tool!





Bull Run Illustrations

5 12 2011

Rebels Fiendishly Bayonetting Wounded Union Troops After the Battle of Bull Run

This link, sent in by reader Terrance Young, shows illustrations relating to First Bull Run which appeared in Harper’s Weekly and the New York Illustrated News. Cool stuff there – check it out. Thanks Terry!





Merry Christmas 2010

24 12 2010





Review: “Old Abe, Eagle Hero”

30 08 2010

Old Abe, Eagle Hero: The Civil War’s Most Famous Mascot is a children’s picture book written by Patrick Young and illustrated by Anne Lee.  In terms easy enough for very young readers to understand, the book relates the familiar story of the mascot of the 8th Wisconsin Infantry regiment, a North American bald eagle named for POTUS 16.  Since the story is familiar to Civil War buffs, I won’t go into too many details (but you can get some here and here).  In fact, the story is so familiar that this same text was used in this earlier edition, with a different illustrator.  And that different illustrator in this case makes a big difference.  The watercolors in this new edition are striking.

So, this being a kid’s book, I asked a kid – my 12-year-old son – to read it, even though it’s a few years too young for him.  But 12-year-olds being what they are, I couldn’t get him to sit down and type up a review.  The long and the short of it is like me he dug the book.  It took him all of about 5 minutes to read, but he got the gist of Old Abe’s story.  However, he had the same question I had: after a concise account of Old Abe’s life from his birth through the end of the war, his story ends abruptly in 1876, when he travelled to Philadelphia for the centennial exhibition.  What happened to Old Abe? When and how did he die?

A little digging on the web turned up the info, though I’m still not sure if the bird was a he or a she.  In 1881, Old Abe died as a result of a fire near his rooms in the basement of the Wisconsin state Capitol.  After his death he was stuffed and put on display in a glass case in the building, where he stayed until he and the building were destroyed in another fire in 1904.  Below are a few pictures of Old Abe: with his fellow soldiers before reaching maturity, when his head turned white; a couple of publicity photos (he used to “autograph” them by poking a hole with his beak); and what is possibly all that remains of him, a single feather.  All photos from this site.

   





Civil War Art – Howard Pyle

31 01 2009

In my continuing quest to show that Civil War art doesn’t have to suck, I ran acorss these here.  N. C. Wyeth was a pupil of Howard Pyle.  Here are a few of Pyle’s CW illustrations – click on the thumbnails for large images:

I Thought of You When I Was Falling It Was a Comrade From His Own Regiment The Charge The Midnight Court Martial They Talked it Over - With Me On a Horse Generla Lee on His Famous Charger "Traveller" Lincoln's Last Day

Left to right: I Was Thinking of You When I Fell; It Was a Comrade From His Own Regiment; The Charge; The Midnight Court Matial; They Talked it Over – With Me On a Horse; General Lee on His Famous Charger “Traveller”; Lincoln’s Last Day.





Civil War Art – N. C. Wyeth

19 01 2009

As so many folks have stopped by here recently looking for N. C. Wyeth artwork, I thought I’d post this little gallery.  I’ll add to it as I find more.  It’s hard not to wax nostalgic when I see these.  Like many of you, I spent a good deal of time in my youth staring at Wyeth’s illustrations in Treasure Island and Kidnapped!  Click on the thumbnails for larger images.

civil1 civil2 civil3 civil4 civil6





Hittsville Hits Bull Runnings

16 01 2009

I’m getting hits out the wazoo today – this should set a record.  For some reason, lots of folks are looking at my old post ….but I know what I like from 4/24/2007.  Admittedly, this is my all-time most viewed post.  Mostly people view that post as a result of searches for N. C. Wyeth.  The difference today is that there are a whole heck of a lot more of you.  I suppose this is due to reports of the death today of N. C.’s son, artist Andrew Wyeth.  He was 91 years old, and painted (among others) the famous Christina’s World:

christinas-world

I’m not going to kid myself that many of you are here for any reason other than you were looking for info on the recently deceased artist and perhaps his father.  But I welcome you to the site; take a look around while you’re here.  Check the tag Civil War Art for some other posts on that topic.








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