Lottery for Bull Run 150th Event

19 04 2011

Friend Craig Swain hipped me to this announcement of a lottery for tickets to the shindig.

A limited number of tickets for the July 21 Manassas 150th Commemorative Ceremony will be made available through a lottery.

The morning ceremony near the Manassas National Battlefield Park visitor center on Henry Hill will feature a keynote address by Dr. Ed Ayers and music by the U.S. Marine Corps Band. Only those with tickets will have access to the Henry Hill area of the battlefield during the event. The area is expected to re-open to visitors at noon.

Four thousand tickets to the special ceremony will be distributed through an online lottery. Applications will be accepted from 10 am April 27 through 10 pm May 4. Winners will be notified by email on May 9.

For more information on the event and the ticket lottery: www.virginiacivilwar.org/manassas.php

As of now, I have no plans to attend – but it sounds like fun.





New Civil War Stamps From USPS

13 04 2011

The U. S. Postal Service announced a new series of stamps for the sesquicentennial. Here’s the email they sent me:

Postal Service Begins Civil War Stamp Series

Multi-year Series Marks Historic Events during 150-Year Anniversary

To obtain high-resolution images of the stamps for media use only, email mark.r.saunders@usps.gov

CHARLESTON, SC — The U.S. Postal Service today issued the first of an annual series of Forever Stamps that recognize key events of the Civil War — America’s bloodiest conflict, which began 150 years ago today at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor.

The first-day-of-issue dedication ceremony took place at Liberty Square in Charleston, a location within earshot of cannon fire that ignited the conflict that killed 670,000 Americans — a casualty rate exceeding the combined total of Americans killed in all wars since that time.

“From this day forward, these historic images of Fort Sumter and the First Battle of Bull Run will be carried on letters and packages to millions of households and businesses throughout America,” said James C. Miller III, U.S. Postal Service Board of Governor member in dedicating the stamps. “In this small way, the United States Postal Service recognizes the Civil War as a significant and uniquely American experience, and we hope to share the lessons learned ― as well as the story of those who endured the four-year ordeal ― with Americans everywhere.”

Joining Miller in the ceremony were Thurgood Marshall Jr., vice chairman, U.S. Postal Service Board of Governors; David Vela, southeast region director, National Park Service; Dr. Edmund L. Drago, author and professor of History, College of Charleston; and Timothy Shaw, Charleston Postmaster.

“Since the founding of our country, Americans have wrestled with fundamental questions about the scope of freedom,” said Marshall. “When the war finally ended, four devastating years later, the demand for separation had been denied, and slavery was forever ended in the United States. At last, the country was ready to accept responsibility for the words in its own Declaration of Independence that ‘all men are created equal.’ Today, many issues remain unresolved by this uniquely American war — and yet, one universal truth remains. We are truly one nation of free men and women.”

“The Civil War commemorative stamps will provide meaning and true reflection for generations to come,” explained Vela. “Through events and programs held throughout the country, it is our hope that the citizens of this nation will be challenged to consider how their lives, and their own American experience, have been shaped by this signature period of American history. For it is a shared history, and a shared legacy, owned by all.”

This first pane of the series, to be issued annually through 2015 in double sided sheets of 12 stamps, depicts two stamp designs commemorating the beginning of the war in April 1861 at Fort Sumter and the first major battle of the war near Manassas, VA.

Art director, Phil Jordan of Falls Church, VA, created the stamps using images of Civil War battles. The Fort Sumter stamp is a reproduction of a Currier & Ives lithograph, circa 1861, titled “Bombardment of Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor.” The Bull Run stamp is a reproduction of a 1964 painting by Sidney E. King titled “The Capture of Rickett’s Battery.”  The painting depicts fierce fighting on Henry Hill for an important Union artillery battery during the Battle of First Bull Run. For the stamp pane’s background image, Jordan used a photograph dated circa 1861 of a Union regiment assembled near Falls Church, VA.

Civil War Mail Service

Mail was a treasured link among Civil War camps, battlefields and home. Recognizing its importance to morale, both northern and southern armies assigned personnel to collect, distribute and deliver soldiers’ mail. Wagons and tents served as traveling Post Offices. Visit this link for additional information.

Postal Service Commitment to Veterans

While the Postal Service does not maintain records on the thousands of Civil War veterans who worked for the Post Office Department, today’s Postal Service stands proud as the nation’s largest civilian employer of veterans. Of more than 578,000 career employees, more than one-fifth of its workforce — nearly 128,000 — are veterans, 48,000 of whom are disabled.

Ordering First-Day-of-Issue Postmarks

Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at their local Post Office, at The Postal Store website at www.usps.com/shop, or by calling 800-STAMP-24. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes to themselves or others, and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:

Civil War: 1861 Stamps

Postmaster

7075 Cross County Road

Charleston, SC 29423-9998

After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark. All orders must be postmarked by June 13, 2011.

Ordering First-Day Covers

Stamp Fulfillment Services also offers first-day covers for new stamp issues and Postal Service stationery items postmarked with the official first-day-of-issue cancellation. Each item has an individual catalog number and is offered in the quarterly USA Philatelic catalog. Customers may request a free catalog by calling 800-STAMP-24 or writing to:

Information Fulfillment

Dept. 6270

U.S. Postal Service

PO Box 219014

Kansas City, MO  64121-9014

Purchasing Civil War Forever Stamps and Related Products

While supplies last, the Civil War souvenir sheets, the Civil War Keepsakes with Digital Color Postmarks, and the 1861 Collectors Folio will be available at select Post Offices. Also, customers can order all stamps and products online at www.usps.com/shop, by calling 1-800 STAMP-24, or by using the mail-in order form in the USA Philatelic Catalog. You can subscribe to the catalog at www.beyondtheperf.com, www.usps.com/shop, or by calling 1-800 STAMP-24.

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses, and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

Here are the images – click on the thumbs for a larger image:

  





Charleston Sesquistuff

12 04 2011

If you simply can’t get enough Sesquisumter, here’s a link to WCBD TV2 Charleston. There are a few videos and stories that will be updated regularly. You’ll have to allow popups.

Here and here are great photo galleries of goings-on in the city fr0m the Post and Courier.

If you’re planning a trip to Charleston, here’s a post on some of the sites and sights.





Prince William County and the African-American Civil War Experience

10 04 2011

Prince William County will present programs on the African-Americans in the Civil War as part of their sesquicentennial schedule. Check it out here. Hat tip to Craig Swain. See PWC’s main sesqui page here.





Manassas Sesqui Shindig

2 03 2011

Go here for details on tickets for the upcoming sesquicentennial commemoration at Manassas.





Ball’s Bluff Sesqui

24 02 2011

Friend Jim Morgan has passed along this link to information on an upcoming commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the Battle of Ball’s Bluff.  Check it out.





Fairfax County’s Sesqui

19 01 2011

The good folks at Farifax County (separated from Prince William County by Bull Run) sent me some info regarding the observance of the Sesquicentennial there.

Just as it is today, Fairfax County, Virginia, was a strategic hub of activity throughout the Capital Region during the Civil War. The County will once again serve as the crossroads to history as the region plays host to myriad of commemorative events and special exhibits marking the Sesquicentennial, or 150th anniversary, of the Civil War beginning in Spring 2011.

Visit Fairfax, the official tourism organization for Fairfax County, Virginia, welcomes the world to stay with us for this momentous occasion. Centrally located in the region and literally on the border of Bull Run and Manassas National Battlefield Park, Fairfax County is the ideal base camp from which you can easily get to historic battlefields and attractions, the majesty of downtown Washington, DC, as well as modern luxuries, like award-winning restaurants, shopping and the Virginia wine country.

We invite you to visit our dedicated Civil War site and follow all our Civil War movements online through Facebook and on Twitter (@fairfaxcivilwar). Also be sure to sign up for our monthly Civil War newsletter that highlights the rich heritage of Fairfax County, VA and the region.

You and your Bull Runnings readers might also be interested in downloading the educational brochure we created. Contact Patrick Lennon (plennon@fxva.com) to order complimentary hard copies of the brochure.

Members of the media may contact either Sarah Maciejewski of Visit Fairfax or Melissa Gold of White+Partners PR for interviews, content or related images (contact information is listed below).

We look forward to commemorating the rich Civil War history of Fairfax County, Virginia, and the surrounding Capital Region with you over the next several years.

Best regards,





2011 Manassas and PWC Sesqui Activities

4 01 2011

Here’s an article with a calendar of sesquicentennial events in Virginia in 2011.  Below are events scheduled for Manassas and Prince William County in the first quarter:

  • Manassas Museum: “Mosby in Manassas and Prince William.” Lecture. 2 p.m. Jan. 16. Free. 9101 Prince William St., Manassas. Info: 703-368-1873, or www.manassasmuseum.org.
  • Manassas Blue and Gray Ball: Civil War food, music and dancing. Jan. 22, Hylton Performing Arts Center, 10900 University Blvd., Manassas. $150 per person. Info: 703-361-6599 ext. 102.
  • Old Manassas Courthouse: “There Stands Jackson: The Life and Times of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson.” Lecture. 7 p.m. Jan. 27. Free. 9248 Lee Ave., Manassas. Info: 703-367-7872.
  • Manassas Museum: “Back of the Big House and the Planters Project.” Lecture on slave life during the Civil War. 2 p.m. Feb. 6. Free. 9101 Prince William St., Manassas. Info: 703-368-1873 or www.manassasmuseum.org.
  • Liberia Mansion: “A Slave’s Life at Liberia Plantation.” Living history, music and stories at the Liberia Mansion, 8601 Portner Ave., Manassas. 2 p.m. Feb. 12. $15. Info: 703-368-1873.
  • Old Manassas Courthouse: “Plantation Culture from Those Who Built It: A View of Slavery through Architecture and Art.” Lecture. 7 p.m. Feb. 24. Free. 9248 Lee Ave, Manassas. Info: 703-367-7872.
  • Liberia Plantation: Dinner with General P.G.T. Beauregard. March 19. $25. 8601 Portner Ave., Manassas. Info and registration: 703-368-1873.
  • Manassas Museum: “Manassas: Legends and Lies.” Lecture by John Hennessy. Book signing follows. 2 p.m. March 27 Free. 9101 Prince William St., Manassas. Info: 703-368-1873 or www.manassasmuseum.org.
  • Old Manassas Courthouse: “They Fought Like Demons: Female Combatants in the Civil War.” Lecture. 7 p.m. March 21 Free. 9248 Lee Ave, Manassas. Info: 703-367-7872.

The March 21 lecture may be presented by Elizabeth Leonard, who gave Bull Runnings an interview recently.

If any of you have any more information on these events, let me know in the comments section!





1911 Peace Jubilee to be Reenacted

3 01 2011

Here and here are a couple of articles on the reenactment of the July 21, 1911 Peace Jubilee to be held on its 100th anniversary in Manassas as part of Prince William County’s Civil War Sesquicentennial observation.  The above is an image of President Taft opening the jubilee, on the steps of the same courthouse in Old Town Manassas where the reenactment will take place.





A New Year, a Stamp, and a Milestone

31 12 2010

First, Happy New Year to all my readers and Facebook fans.  Here’s hoping 2011 will be as good as or better than its predecessors.

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Second, the U. S, Postal Service has announced it will be releasing Civil War themed stamps in each year of the sesquicentennial (see here).  The first two stamps will commemorate 1861 events, the bombing of Ft. Sumter and the Battle of First Bull Run.  I could only find this small image of the Bull Run stamp, but it is a copy of the painting that hangs on the wall of the Manassas Visitor Center, The Capture of Ricketts’ Battery, painted for the NPS in 1964 by Sydney E. King.  Here’s a nice big image of the painting (click for a larger version):

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Third and last, this is the 1,000th post on Bull Runnings – thanks for stopping by!