Special Orders #39 & #95 – Limits of Command of Brig. Gen. Milledge L. Bonham

12 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 879-880

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. M. L. Bonham,
Commanding, &c., Manassas Junction, Va.:

Sir: In reply to your inquiries of the 24th instant, I inclose a copy of Special Orders, No. 39, of the 10th instant, which, with Special Orders, No. 95, of the 21st instant, and the schedule to the governor’s proclamation of the 3d instant, contain all orders that have been issued in relation to the limits of your command. Special Orders, No. 95, gave you control of the troops at Culpeper Court-House, and, of course, of Colonel Ewell with them. On inquiry at the Exchange, I am informed that the u return ” of troops on the Alexandria line has been forwarded to you. The commanding general desires to be informed, as early as practicable, of the exact extent to which the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad has been destroyed in the direction of Alexandria.

I am, &c.,

R. S. GARNETT, Adjutant- General.

[Inclosures.]

Special Orders,
No. 39.

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 10, 1861.


II. Col. G. H. Terrett, of the Provisional Army of Virginia, will take charge of the troops from the counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Fauquier, and the defense of those counties.

III. Col. P. St. George Cocke, Virginia Volunteers, will retain his headquarters at or near Culpeper Court-House, and organize into regiments as fast as possible the troops called out from the counties of Rappahannock, Culpeper, Madison, Greene, Orange, Albemarle, Nelson, Amherst, Campbell, Bedford, Roanoke, Botetourt, and Craig, assigning to their command the field officers placed at his disposal. He will direct the commands of Cols. S. Garland and J. F. Preston to repair to Manassas Junction and report for duty to Colonel Terrett.


By order of Major-General Lee:

R. S. GARNETT.

Special Orders,
No. 95.

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 21, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. M. L. Bonham, of the C. S. Army, is assigned to the command of the troops on the line to Alexandria. He will post his brigade of South Carolina volunteers at the Manassas Junction, and establish his headquarters at that point or in advance, as he may find necessary. He will be guided by the instructions given to Col. George H. Terrett, commanding at Alexandria, and to Col. P. St. George Cocke, at Culpeper Court-House, whose commands are embraced within his district, and are put under his control.


By order of Major-General Lee:

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant-General.





Brig. Gen. Milledge L. Bonham to Col. Robert S. Garnett (?), On the Occupation of Alexandria

10 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

REPORTS, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 42

No. 5. Reports of Brig. Gen. M. L. Bonham, C. S. Army, commanding at Manassas, Va.

Manassas Junction, Va., May 25, 1861.

Colonel: Colonel Terrett, with as many of his troops as he could bring off with him, arrived at 11 o’clock, the enemy occupying Alexandria with one thousand troops, as is supposed by Colonel Terrett. If the enemy advance on this line it is manifest that a much larger force is necessary here. There are but six hundred infantry here, seven companies of Preston’s command having gone to Harper’s Ferry. We need artillery very much. There are four small pieces only here. I can order up the two companies of cavalry from Occoquan and Accotink. There is but one troop of cavalry here. With a good engineer I could get on better. Will do the best I can.

In haste, your obedient servant,

M. L. BONHAM.

[Filed here as Official Correspondence, but in the Official Records as Reports.]





Col. Robert S. Garnett to Brig. Gen. Milledge L. Bonham on Assets Forwarded to Manassas Junction

8 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 872-873

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 25,1861.

Brigadier-General Bonham,
Commanding, &c., Manassas Junction, Va.:

Sir: Major Williamson, now on engineer duty on the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers, has been ordered by telegraph to report to you. With his practical knowledge of engineering, and the assistance of Lieutenant Colonels Ewell, Jordan, and Jones, all capable men, it is believed that you will be enabled to adopt judicious means of defense for your position. An additional regiment of infantry will be sent you tomorrow. Be pleased to make formal requisitions on the proper departments for whatever may be necessary for your command, and forward them to this office. As soon as practicable, the commanding general desires a statement of the circumstances under which Ball’s dragoons were captured[*], as mentioned in your telegraphic dispatch.

I am, &c.,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant- General.

[*Mottram Dulany Ball and his Border Guards/ Fairfax Cavalry were captured during the Federal occupation of Alexandria. Bonham described this in a letter to Lt. Col. Thomas Jordan on May 28, 1861. This correspondence is included in the Official Records as the report of Bonham on the occupation of Alexandria.]





Col. Robert S. Garnett to Brig. Gen. Milledge L. Bonham on the Importance of Manassas Junction

7 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 872

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 24,1861.

Brig. Gen. M. L. Bonham, Comdg. Manassas Junction, Va.:

General : Colonel Moore’s regiment (seven companies) of Virginia volunteers has been ordered to join you to-morrow, and an additional battery of artillery. If strong defensible positions can be found on Bull Bun Creek, or in advance of it, it is advised that they be also occupied and strengthened; but the position of Manassas Junction, being of great importance to us, must be secured by all means in your power.* * * * * * * * *

I am, &c.,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant- General.

*Matters of detail omitted.





Col. Thomas J. Jackson to Col. Robert S. Garnett on Command Dispute at Harper’s Ferry

7 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 871-872

Headquarters, Harper’s Ferry, Va., May 24,1861.

Col. R. S. Garnett, Adjutant-General:

Colonel: I forward herewith copies of correspondence between General J. E. Johnston, of the C. S. Army, and myself. Major Whiting has taken charge of the defenses.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,
Col. Virginia Vols., Comdg. at Harper’s Ferry, Va.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

Harper’s Ferry, Va., May 24, 1861.

Colonel Jackson, Virginia Forces:

Colonel: Will you oblige me by having the inclosed order copied and distributed to the different regiments?

Very respectfully,

J. E. JOHNSTON.

[Inclosure -No. 2.]

Orders, No. —.] Harper’s Ferry, Va., May 24,1861.

In obedience to the orders of the Secretary of War, the undersigned assumes the command of the troops at and in the vicinity of this place.

Maj. E. E. McLean, C. S. Army, will take the direction of the operations of the Quartermaster’s Department; Maj. W. H. C. Whiting those of the Engineer Corps.

J. E. JOHNSTON, Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

Headquarters,
Harper’s Ferry, Va., May 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. E. Johnston, C. S. A.:

General: I have the honor of acknowledging the receipt of your note of this morning, requesting the publication of an order, as coming from you, assuming the command of this post, in obedience to the orders of the Secretary of War, and directing Maj. E. E. McLean, C. S. Army, to take the direction of the operations of the Quartermaster’s Department, and Maj. W. H. C. Whiting those of the Engineer Corps. Until I receive further instructions from Governor Letcher or General Lee, I do not feel at liberty to transfer my command to another, and must therefore decline publishing the order. Meanwhile I beg you to be assured that it will give me pleasure to afford to yourself and to the other officers named every facility in my power for obtaining appropriate information relating to the post and departments of the service connected with it.

I am, general, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,
Col. Virginia Vols., and Comdg. at Harper’s Ferry, Va.





Col. Thomas J. Jackson to Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee on Situation in Northwestern Virginia

5 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 863-864

Headquarters, Harper’s Ferry, Va., May 21, 1861.

Maj. Gen. E. E. Lee, Commanding Virginia Forces:

General: Since this place has been strengthened by additional troops and artillery, so as to give confidence to our people, there has been a manifest improvement in public sentiment in this county; but I regret to say that in Berkeley things are growing worse, and that the threats from Union men are calculated to curb the expression of Southern feeling. While I have been unwilling to diminish the force here, yet, for the purpose of checking the disloyalty there, I have ordered the regiment from Jefferson opposite to Williamsport. You speak of concern at the want of alacrity on the part of companies west of here. This is partly due to their unarmed condition and want of a secure place of rendezvous. If no better plan is practicable, I would suggest that a force destined for the northwest be assembled, ostensibly for the defense of this part of the State, at Winchester, or some point near here, and that the moment that the governor’s proclamation announces the ratification by the people of the ordinance of secession, such troops be put in the cars, as though they were coming to this place, but that they be immediately thrown into the northwest, and at once crush out opposition. This force need remain there only for a short time, until the local ones could be armed. You will pardon me for urging promptness in what is to be done for that section of the State. Any want of this may be disastrous.

I send herewith a letter from Captain Shriver, of Wheeling, who has been on a visit here. I wrote to Colonel Garnett that Colonel Huger had gone on to Richmond, for the purpose of procuring whatever may be necessary for the efficiency of the heavy batteries; but I regret to learn that he has been delayed by sickness on his way. Should he not reach Richmond before this letter, please forward a large supply of ammunition for ten 24-pounder guns, if it can be spared. Should Colonel Huger be prevented from reaching Richmond soon, I hope you will, if available, send me a practical ordnance officer. I have been depending on Colonel Huger for mounting and rendering efficient the heavy guns, with the exception of those intrusted to Lieutenant Fauntleroy.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,
Colonel, Virginia Volunteers, Commanding Harper’s Ferry, Va.

P. S.—I have about ninety thousand percussion caps.

[Inclosure.]

Harper’s Ferry, Va., May 19, 1861.

Colonel Jackson, Commandant, Harpers Ferry, Va,:

At this time there is between three and four hundred Federal troops stationed upon the fair grounds on Wheeling Island, Ohio County, Virginia. They have been regularly sworn into the service of the U. S. Government by Colonel Oakes, who has been in the city of Wheeling for some time past expressly for that purpose. These troops have been furnished with arms by the U. S. Government at the request of citizens of the counties of Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, and Marshall, for the express purpose of resisting the authorities of the State of Virginia. At this time A. W. Campbell, of the city of Wheeling, by a published authority from Governor Dennison, of Ohio, will not permit citizens of Wheeling to ship provisions in any quantities over the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

Yours, truly,

DAN. M. SHRIVER.

Likely Daniel McElheran Shriver, later Lt. Col. of the 27th Virginia Infantry. FindAGrave





Col. Robert S. Garnett to Col. Jubal A. Early on Arms and Organization

5 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 858-859

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 20, 1861.

Col. J. A. Early, Lynchburg, Va.:

Sir: In reply to your letters of the 16th and 17 th instants*, the commanding-general now instructs me to say that he has this day ordered the Ordnance Department to forward to your address one thousand original percussion muskets, one thousand altered, and one thousand flint locks, and sixty thousand rounds of ammunition, to be issued by you to such companies of Virginia volunteers without arms as may be mustered in at Lynchburg, or arrive there already mustered in. The ten companies which you have reported may be organized into a regiment, to the command of which you may assign Colonel Radford, if they are the companies raised by him and reported to the governor. If they be not, you may assign Colonel Radford, or any other colonel, and field officers to them as may be deemed best, observing the rule as far as practicable to associate together companies and field officers from the same region of country. As soon as this regiment is organized and armed, order it to report to the commanding officer at Culpeper Court-House. In regard to staff officers of experience, the general regrets to inform you that there are none to be had at present, and hopes that you will be able to instruct those you already have until they shall become useful.

I am, &c.,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant- General.

*Letter of 17th not found.





Brig. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston Notifies Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee of His Return to Virginia and Harper’s Ferry

4 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 856

Abingdon, Va., May 18,1861.

Major-General Lee, Commander-in-Chief, &c.:

General: I respectfully inclose herewith a copy of the instructions under which I return to Virginia.* Debility compelled me to stop at this place. I expect to be in Lynchburg during Monday, and beg you to convey to me by telegraph any information you can communicate, which you think of interest to my command, especially in relation to supplies of ammunition and provisions. Should the contemplated conditions justify it, I request that the two officers named in the postscript (should it meet their own views) may be ordered to join me forthwith. The President intends to assemble an army near Harper’s Ferry. I suggested the proviso, because it seemed to me likely that Lieutenant-Colonel Pemberton might be at the head of the artillery of the State.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,
Brigadier-General, C. S. Army

*See Cooper to Johnston, May 15, 1861, p. 844





Col. Jubal A. Early to Col. Robert S. Garnett on Recruiting and Arming Troops

4 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 851-853

Lynchburg, Va., May 16, 1861.

Col. R. S. Garnett, Adjutant-General, Virginia Forces:

Colonel: I arrived here this morning, and have assumed command of the Virginia volunteers mustered into the service of the State at this place. It was not possible for me to get here sooner, as I was compelled to make some preparation to enable me to go into the service. I find that Lieutenant-Colonel Langhorne has mustered into the service two companies of cavalry, one from Lynchburg and the other from Bedford; also, seven companies of infantry, two from Lynchburg, two from Bedford, two from Botetourt, and one from Floyd. Two companies reached here this evening from Roanoke, and will be mustered into the service to-morrow. The company of cavalry from Lynchburg, commanded by Capt. John S. Langhorne, has sabers, but no other arms. The company of cavalry from Bedford, commanded by Capt. William E. Terry, has about fifty sabers, leaving twenty odd without any arms, and those having sabers have no other arms. Three companies, belonging to the Twelfth Brigade of Militia, were reported by the adjutant-general of the militia as armed. The infantry companies have no arms whatever, and I imagine that there are no companies in the counties for which this place is the rendezvous which are armed. I know such is the case in the Twelfth Brigade, composed of the counties of Campbell, Bedford, Franklin, Henry, and Patrick. All the armed companies were ordered into the service by the governor some time since. If, therefore, five regiments of infantry and riflemen and one of cavalry are mustered into the service at this place, and they are armed here, it will be necessary to have sent here near five thousand stand of muskets and rifles, and the same number of sets of accouterments, and about one thousand arms for cavalry, and the like number of sets of accouterments. Some of the companies already here have knapsacks, but most of them are without them, and those likely to come hereafter will be entirely unprovided in that particular. There are not quite enough tents, of an inferior quality and make, for the troops that are here, and no suitable material is to be found at this place for making more. There are not enough mess-pans and camp-kettles for the troops that have been mustered into service, and the assistant quartermaster, Captain Gilmer, informs me that he has orders from the head of the Quartermaster’s Department to make no contract for the manufacture of any articles without orders from headquarters. There are several establishments here in which mess-pans, camp-kettles, and canteens can be manufactured, and I suggest that orders be given to that effect. If knapsacks cannot be furnished from Richmond, the men can make out pretty well by rolling up their clothes in their blankets and wrapping pieces of coarse cloth around them; and there are several large tobacco factories, which are idle, and can be procured as quarters for the troops, so that if arms can be furnished we can get along. If there are plenty of good flint-lock muskets they will do very well if percussion muskets cannot be furnished to all.

I find matters here in quite a confused state, owing to the inexperience of the officers of all the departments. Lieutenant-Colonel Langhorne has made no apportionment of troops among the counties to rendezvous here, and, in fact, has made no call, specifying the number to be received at this place. He has merely given notice, in the papers, that he would muster into service volunteer companies from the counties designated. This has produced a good deal of uncertainty and confusion. I do not wish this to be considered as a complaint against Colonel Langhorne. It results from his entire want of experience in such matters. I am satisfied he has been endeavoring to discharge his duty faithfully; but I would very respectfully suggest that it is rather out of the usual course to intrust to a mustering officer, of inferior rank, so large a discretion in regard to calling out volunteers. It strikes me that a call stating the number of regiments to be received here and the number and kind of companies to be raised in each county would facilitate the business very much. Some of the counties, as, for instance, Henry, Patrick, Carroll, Giles, Mercer, Tazewell, Wise, Buchanan, and McDowell, are remote from the lines of railroad, and cannot be communicated with very expeditiously; and, therefore, it is important that the call upon them should be definite. I would also suggest that it is not likely that there will be more cavalry companies from the counties east of the mountains except the two already mustered and one from Franklin unless, perhaps, one may be raised in Campbell. The counties west of the Alleghany must be relied on to furnish the remainder of the companies required to make out a regiment. Colonel Radford has reported, and he would prefer having command of the regiment of cavalry, and I think it would be better to give it to him, as he will, in all likelihood, be the only colonel that will be available who has had experience as a cavalry officer. I do not understand exactly the last orders in regard to the troops from Campbell, Bedford, Botetourt, Roanoke, and Craig (letter from Major-General Lee, of May 9). Am I to organize a regiment out of said troops, and give Colonel Radford the command of it, or shall I give him command of the whole, including the cavalry companies, and order him to report with them to Colonel Cocke? Shall I send off said troops before they are armed, or wait for their arms?

Lieutenant-Colonel Langhorne informs me that he received instructions to send Captain Moorman’s company (called the Beauregard Rifles) to Richmond, to be armed. The order, however, has been mislaid, and, as he may have misunderstood its tenor, and the instructions are inconsistent with the orders to me to send the troops from Campbell, &c., to Colonel Cocke, I have thought proper to wait for further orders, which, for dispatch, can be sent by telegraph, if the company is to be sent to Richmond.

A Mr. Eugene Carrington has exhibited to me an order from Major Ficklin, quartermaster, appointing him transportation agent here, and directing all orders for transporting troops, &c., from this place to emanate from him. I had thought that the quartermaster here would have control of the arrangements for transportation from this point, but I confess I am little acquainted with such matters, and I submit whether the appointment by Major Ficklin of a transportation agent here (while there is a quartermaster here) is regular.

I hardly think much can be done in the way of arming cavalry companies with double-barreled guns in this region. A number of the men have not got them, and have not the means of purchasing them if they were to be had.

You will pardon the length of this letter, but I thought it better to embrace all the matters about which I want instructions, and about which it is necessary to communicate with you, in one letter than several.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. EARLY,
Colonel, Volunteers, Commanding at Lynchburg, Va.





Col. Robert S. Garnett to Col. George H. Terrett on Marylanders Looking to Serve the State

3 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 851

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 16, 1861.

Col. George H. Terrett,
Provisional Army of Virginia, Comdg., &c., Alexandria, Va.:

Colonel: In reply to your inquiries, by telegraph, in relation to persons from Maryland desiring to pass over the roads, to offer their services to the State, I am instructed by the commanding general to say that you can offer them service in your command and muster them in if they accept it.

I am, sir, &c.,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant- General.