Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke to Col. Robert S. Garnett on His Rank

25 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 823

Headquarters Potomac Department,
Culpeper Court-House, Va., May 9,1861.

Col. R. S. Garnett: I send herewith a copy of the orders under which I assumed command of officers of all grades on the line of the Potomac, along the entire boundary of the State as marked by said river, holding commission as brigadier general of volunteers, by authority of the governor and council, and confirmed by the Convention.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Potomac Department.

[Inclosure.]

Richmond, Va., April 21, 1861.

The council of state, in absence of the governor, directs that officers of all grades on the line of the Potomac shall obey the orders of General P. St. George Cocke, who has been assigned by the governor to the command of that section of the military operations of the State bounded by said river.

By order of the council of state:

JOHN J. ALLEN,
President of the Council.





Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke to Col. Robert S. Garnett, on Troop Strength

25 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 818-819

Headquarters Potomac Department,
Culpeper Court-House, Va., May 8, 1861.

Col. R. S. Garnett:

Your order of May 7, this moment received, stating that “The general in command is in want of information from you as to the strength and organization of your command, and begs that you will supply him with it at the earliest possible moment. The return due on the 1st instant by General Orders, No. 4, has not been received. The general desires particularly to know with what force you can take the field, provided any movement is made against you from Washington; how it would be composed, officered, and what service could be counted on from it.” I have to say in reply that, coming to this command with “naked hands” and in my plantation dress, arriving in Alexandria on the morning of the 22d of April, I have had everything to do towards organization, with extremely limited means of accomplishing anything. It has been entirely impracticable, in consequence of the want of my proper staff, until very recently, to initiate the means of obtaining the regular, formal, and full company returns and other returns which would show the strength and organization of the weak, unorganized, and widely-scattered force under my command.

The assistant adjutant-general, since his appointment and entrance upon duty, has taken the most active steps to accomplish the objects desired by the commanding general. Those steps will be persevered in. Such partial returns as I have been able to obtain from time to time from captains, both in regard to number of men, arms, and ammunition, and general equipment, have been forwarded to the headquarters at Richmond, and will be found on file there.

The assistant adjutant-general, Jones, has this morning left me, by my order, under the pressing emergency of sending the only experienced officer of the army at my command to march with the Powhatan troop this moment en route for Manassas Junction, to assist in collecting, establishing, and organizing at that point the force that I may be able to command, to carry into effect the order of the general-in-chief, received yesterday, to occupy and hold that point against any probable attack of the enemy. I propose to follow myself to-morrow with such other forces as I can gather, going “by rail” to the same point, and thus to effect a contemporaneous arrival at Manassas Junction. This necessary absence of the assistant adjutant-general from these headquarters, together with the yet unorganized state of the general staff and the inexperience of many of the captains of many of the companies, will yet cause some delay in making regular army returns.

I beg, however, that the general-in-chief will have collated from my dispatches and reports from the beginning the information therein imparted in this connection, and which may thus furnish him with an approximate estimate and exhibit at least of the available forces heretofore and now at my command.

In order to facilitate the accomplishment of this object, I will here briefly indicate from the best sources I possess the present character and disposition of what available force I have. (See statement inclosed.)

Very respectfully,

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Potomac Department.

[Inclosure.]

Headquarters Potomac Department,
Culpeper Court-House, May 8,1861.

Company E, Sixth Battalion, Capt. S. H. Devaughn, 100 men in all, 50 muskets, .58 caliber; no ammunition.

Company H, Sixth Battalion, Capt. M. Marye, 69 men in all, 50 muskets, .58 caliber; no ammunition; in Alexandria now.

Company G, Sixth Battalion, Lieut. A. Herbert, 88 men in all, 51 muskets, .69 caliber; no ammunition; in Alexandria now.

Company, Fairfax Rifles, W. H. Dulany, captain, 51 men armed, and have 940 cartridges; Fairfax Station.

Company, Washington Volunteers, Captain Sherman, 113 men, unarmed and ununiformed; no ammunition; here.

Company, Richardson Guards, Capt. J. Welsh, 80 men, 1,000 caps and cartridges and equipments; Madison Court-House.

Company, Home Guards, J. Latouche, 100 men, flint-lock muskets, caliber .69; in Alexandria; no equipments or ammunition.

Two companies, Irish, now at Manassas Junction, with altered muskets; no equipments or ammunition.

Company, Captain Porter, now here, 71 men, unarmed and unequipped; no ammunition.

Company, artillery, Capt. Del. Kemper, 86 men, 4 brass 6-pounders, 35 sabers, 67 rounds fixed ammunition, and 25 loose ball; now here; part leave to-morrow for Manassas.

Company, Powell’s troop of cavalry, in Alexandria, 53 men.

Company, J. Shac Green, troop of cavalry, in Amissville, 61 men; will be at Manassas to-morrow.

Company, M. Dulany Ball, troop of cavalry, equipped; now in Alexandria.

Company, W. H. Payne, troop of cavalry; now in Warrenton, holding public property.

Company, John F. Lay, troop of cavalry; left for Manassas Junction to-day; well equipped with ammunition; several have no uniform or pistols.

Two companies in Charlottesville not yet reported.

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,
Brigadier- General, Commanding.

—————

Assistant Adjutant General David R. Jones

S. H. Devaughan – Co. E, 17th VA Infantry

Morton Marye – Co. A, 17th VA Infantry

A. Herbert – Co. H, 17th VA Infantry

W. H. Dulany – Co. D, 17th VA Infantry

Charles K. Sherman – Co. E, 1st VA Infantry (thanks J. Soffe)

J. Welsh – Co. A, 7th VA Infantry (thanks J. Soffe)

J. Latouche – Alexandria Home Guards (thanks J. Soffe)

J. C. Porter – Co. C, 7th VA Infantry (thanks J. Soffe)

Deleware Kemper – Alexandria Light Artillery

E. B. Powell – Fairfax Cavalry, Radford’s Troop, 30th VA Cavalry

John Shackleford Green – Co. B, 6th VA Cavalry

Mottram Dulany Ball – Border Guards/Fairfax Cavalry. Captured 5/24/61 at Alexandria. Paroled and served as scout for G. T. Beauregard prior to exchange. Exchanged 9/21/1862. Later Lt. Col. of 11th VA Cavalry Reported as captured at Alexandria with his troop on May 28, 1861. (thanks J. Soffe)

William H. Payne – Black Horse Troop, Munford’s Battalion, 30th VA Cavalry

John F. Lay – Powhatan Troop, G. T. Beauregard’s Escort





Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke to Col. Robert S. Garnett, on the Move to Manassas

24 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 817-818

Headquarters Potomac Department,
Culpeper Court-House, Va., May 8,1861.

Col. R. S. Garnett:

Sir: In accordance with orders received from the general-in-chief, to post at Manassas Junction sufficient force to defend that point against any attack likely to be made against it by troops from Washington, I immediately ordered the Powhatan troop of cavalry to march from this place this morning, to join Capt. J. S. Green’s company, now at Amissville, Rappahannock County, and to proceed together to Manassas Junction, where there are two (raw, undrilled, ununiformed, and armed with the altered musket) Irish companies, lately sent out from Alexandria, and which I had ordered to be held and drilled at Manassas Junction. We will endeavor to use these companies. I have also ordered one section (two pieces) of Captain Kemper’s artillery, (the only part of his battery at all available as foot artillery, and that rendered available by doubling upon the two pieces the horses and ammunition he had for the four pieces), which I shall also take along to the same point. The Powhatan troop of cavalry and the section of artillery are absolutely all of the force at all available at this time at this place. I have telegraphed back to Charlottesville for two companies of riflemen to be dispatched to this point, and learn from Lieutenant-Colonel Fry that I will get but one, and that not until this evening.

Looking to Lynchburg, I learn that the armed companies of that place are now in Richmond, under Colonel Garland. If so, I trust, sir, they will be immediately dispatched to the command at Manassas.

We have no ammunition of any kind, except the limited supply sent forward to Alexandria. I shall gather in as fast as possible the armed companies that have not been mustered into the service throughout my department (if any there be besides those referred to), and concentrate them here at Manassas and Alexandria, as occasion may require.

From three to five thousand muskets or rifles should be immediately forwarded to this point for the use of this command; thence to be drawn for arming companies, as mustered into service. Some place will be provided as a magazine at this point. The powder, balls, munitions, equipments, and all ammunition whatsoever required for at least five thousand men, should be immediately prepared and forwarded to this place.

The city of Alexandria, situated, as it is, in the re-entering curve of the river opposite to Washington, on the convex side of that curve, is a point difficult to hold, in case the enemy shall have any designs upon it in the present weak condition of our forces. The enemy, by proceeding below, to Fort Washington or Mount Vernon, may turn the position, take it in the rear, and cut off its communication, and so by advancing over the bridges from above the enemy may, by short lines, turn and get in the rear of that place. In order to prevent such a disaster there should be, obviously, outside of and behind Alexandria, a force sufficient to throw out outpost guards, radiating upon the possible lines of advance of the enemy, to protect that place in the rear, and thus to support and cover the little force now held in Alexandria, and prevent its capture or annihilation. With such an arrangement the force in Alexandria could return, without danger of being surprised, and find support in falling back upon the force in its rear. But I have absolutely nothing at present out of which to constitute such a supporting force in rear of Alexandria. As soon as I can collect the means, or you shall send them to me, I shall endeavor to make the best use of them to this end.

Very respectfully, your obedient,

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Potomac Department.

John Shackleford Green became captain of Co. B, 6th Virginia Cavalry.

William H. Fry became Lt. Col. of the 1st Va. Infantry.

Samuel Garland, Jr., became Col. of the 11th Va. Infantry





Col. Robert S. Garnett to Col. Philip St. George Cocke Requesting Report of Troop Strength

23 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 813

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 7,1861.

Col. P. St. George Cocke, Culpeper Court-House, Va.:

Colonel: The general commanding is in want of information from you as to the strength and organization of your command, and begs that you will supply him with it at the earliest moment. The return due on the 1st instant, by General Orders, No. 4, has not been received. The general desires particularly to know with what force you can take the field, provided any movement is made against you from Washington 5 how it would be composed, officered, and what service could be counted on from it.

Very respectfully, &c.,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant- General.





Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee to Col. Philp St. George Cocke on Posting a Force at Manassas Junction

22 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 806

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 6, 1861.

Col. P. St. Georoe Cocke,
Commanding Virginia Forces, Culpeper Court-House, Va.:

Colonel: You are desired to post at Manassas Gap Junction a force sufficient to defend that point against an attack likely to be made against it by troops from Washington. It will be necessary to give this point your personal attention.

Respectfully, &c.,

R. E. LEE,
Major- General, Commanding.





Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke to the Citizens of Northern Virginia

22 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 804-805

Headquarters Potomac Department,
Culpeper Court-House, May 5, 1861.

Commissioned by the governor, with the sanction of the council, and confirmed by the Convention, in the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers, to date from the 21st April, 1861, and placed in command of all the military troops and defenses on the Potomac border of the State, I proceeded, in company with Brigadier-General Ruggles, my second in command, from Richmond, he to take up his headquarters at Fredericksburg, whilst I should take position in front of Washington, and, in connection with the commanding officer at Harper’s Ferry, on my left, thus cover and defend our Potomac border against invasion from the North.

After visiting Alexandria, and making the necessary observations and arrangements at that post, I proceeded to take up my headquarters at this place on Sunday morning, April 28.

The governor’s proclamation of the 3d instant, declaring that “the sovereignty of the Commonwealth of Virginia having been denied, her territorial rights assailed, her soil threatened with invasion by the authorities of Washington, and every artifice employed which could inflame the people of the Northern States to misrepresent our purposes and wishes, it becomes the solemn duty of every citizen of this State to prepare for the impending conflict, and authorizing the commanding general of the military forces of the State to call out and cause to be mustered into the service of Virginia, from time to time, as the public exigencies may require, such additional number of volunteers as he may deem necessary”; and the commanding general, following up the proclamation of the governor, having ordered me to call out and muster into the service of the State volunteer companies from the “counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, Fauquier, Rappahannock, Culpeper, Madison, Greene, Orange, Albemarle, Kelson, Amherst, Campbell, Bedford, Roanoke, Botetourt, and Craig; the troops from the first five counties to rendezvous at Leesburg and Warrenton; those from the five next named at Culpeper Court-House; those from Albemarle, Amherst, and Kelson at Charlottesville; the remaining at Lynchburg,” the whole will be organized into regiments of rifles or infantry, cavalry and artillery, and be placed temporarily under such field and other officers as may be available, until their proper field officers can be appointed by the governor.

Officers will be sent to the respective rendezvous to muster these troops into service and rapidly to organize the whole force.

Therefore, I call upon the brave men within the geographical limits above indicated to respond instantly to this demand upon their patriotism in defense of all that is held sacred and dear to freemen. Men of the Potomac Military Department, to arms! The once peaceful capital of the United States is now the great rallying point of the armed military power of the North! The Constitution of your country, the sovereign rights of your State, truth, justice, and liberty, are all ignored and outraged amidst the brutal and frenzied cry of the North for force, force!

At this moment hosts of armed men profane by their insolent presence the city, the grave, and the memory of Washington, whilst an unbroken stream of thousands in arms violate the soil of Maryland and murder her citizens in their march to re-enforce and occupy the capital.

And for what? The capital has never been threatened; it is not now threatened. It is beyond and outside the limits of the free and sovereign State of Virginia.

The North has not openly, and according to the usage of civilized nations, declared war on us. We make no war on them; but should Virginia soil or the grave of Washington be polluted by the tread of a single man in arms from north of the Potomac, it will cause open war. Men of the Potomac border, men of the Potomac Military Department, to arms! Your country calls you to her defense. Already you have in spirit responded. You await but the order to march, to rendezvous, to organize, to defend your State, your liberties, and your homes.

Women of Virginia! Cast from your arms all cowards, and breathe the pure and holy, the high and glowing, inspirations of your nature into the hearts and souls of lover, husband, brother, father, friend!

Almighty God! Author and Governor of the world; Thou source of all light, life, truth, justice, and power, be Thou our God! Be Thou with us! Then shall we fear not a world against us!

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Potomac Department.





Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee to Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke, Directing Him to Recruit and Form Companies in Northern Virginia

21 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 798-799

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Fa., May 3, 1861.

General P. St. George Cocke, Alexandria, Va.:

General: Under the authority of the governor of Virginia, by his proclamation of the 3d instant, you are hereby authorized to call out and muster into the service of the Slate volunteer companies from the counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, Fauquier, Bappahannock, Culpeper, Madison, Greene, Orange, Albemarle, Nelson, Amherst, Campbell, Bedford, Boanoke, Botetourt, and Craig. The troops from the first five named counties may be directed to rendezvous at Leesburg and Warrenton, as you may find most advantageous. Those from the five next named at Culpeper Court-House; those from Albemarle, Nelson, and Amherst at Charlottesville; the remainder at Lynchburg. The whole number of companies thus called into service, including those now in the service of the State and under your command, will not exceed ten regiments of infantry and rifles, two of cavalry, and eight companies of artillery. You will organize them into regiments, associating, as far as possible, companies from the same section of the State, and place them temporarily under such officers as may be available until their proper field officers can be appointed by the governor. It will be necessary to send officers to the respective rendezvous, to muster them into the service, and it is hoped that you will be able to rapidly organize the whole force. You are desired to report as soon as practicable the number of companies mustered into the service of the State, their arms, condition, &c. You will give directions to the mustering officers to select from the companies that offer those that are best armed and instructed and give promise of efficient service.

Yery respectfully, &c.,

R. E. LEE,
Major-General, Commanding.





Col. Robert S. Garnett, Adjutant-General, Va. Provisional Army, to Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke, on Arms and Defenses of Alexandria

21 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 794-795

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 2,1861.

General P. St. George Cocke:

General: The commanding general has to-day ordered two hundred flint-lock muskets, with fifty rounds of ammunition for each, to be sent without delay to Alexandria, for the troops in and around that point. You are requested to notify the officer in command of the fact.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant-General.


Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 2, 1861.

Brigadier-General Cocke, Virginia Volunteers:

General: You were telegraphed this morning to place Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor or other experienced officer in command of the troops in and about Alexandria. The general directs that he be instructed to take measures to secure the guns, ammunition, and provisions, and to unite with the officers of the railroad companies in securing all the rolling stock of their roads, and in effectually breaking up the roads themselves, should he be driven by force from that point.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant- General.





Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke to Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee on Status and Needs

18 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 786-787

Headquarters Potomac Department,
Culpeper Court-House, Fa., April 28, 1861—12.30 p. m.

General Lee, Commander-in-Chief, Richmond, Va.:

Having completed the requisite arrangements at Alexandria, and succeeded in informing myself of the actual state of things at that outpost of my command, in sight of the enemy, I proceeded this morning, by the 7 o’clock train, accompanied by the assistant adjutant-general, my aide, and secretary, towards this place, which I reached at 10 a. m., and where I propose, for some time to come, to establish my headquarters. I left all quiet and composed at Alexandria, where by my presence, during the suddenly augmented flow of Northern vandalism through Annapolis, I was so fortunate as to avert alarm and panic.

Intelligence first reached me, ever finding a solution through my knowledge of and confident faith in the existing status, not immediately, in my opinion, threatened to be overthrown, so long as there is nothing more than a mere persistence in a course on the part of the enemy, long ago initiated, and even now only intensified and strengthened; thus solving, as I did, the thousand sensations, rumors, and accounts that poured in upon me during my whole stay in Alexandria.

I have been enabled to infuse the same confidence into the minds of the leading citizens of the place, to have secured their confidence, and to have left them for the present tranquil and firm; whilst at the same time I have provided to organize the few troops in that extreme outpost; to provide for strengthening the same for the present up to about one thousand men; to establishing my communications in every direction, and thence to these headquarters; to throw myself in connection with various persons and sources of information at Alexandria; to inform myself as correctly as possible as to the number, efficiency, movements, and animus of the enemy, and by every means in my power to urge on such an organization, drilling, and discipline of the troops of that post as would best prepare them for the trying position they occupy.

In coming here, sir, I find myself, as upon my first arrival in Alexandria, “with naked hands.”

Colonel Jones [*], fortunately assigned to me as assistant adjutant-general, is the first Army officer to report for duty within my command. He promptly arrived in Alexandria last evening, and is with me here to-day. He will know what to do with his department, but I want an assistant quartermaster-general, a chief of the medical department, an ordnance officer, a chief of military engineering of talent. I had heretofore insinuated a preference in this last connection. I want arms. I am expecting from fifteen hundred to two thousand guns from Harper’s Ferry, when they shall be able to fit them up from the wreck of that place. I want a chief of artillery ; I want powder; two or three batteries of field artillery (6-pounders), with caissons, ammunition, complete for service, &c.

My part now will be to rally the men of the fine country around me, to establish camps of instruction, to wit: Leesburg, Warrenton, headquarters, and at or near Dangerfield, in supporting distance of Alexandria. I want camp equipage for the various encampments above indicated.

In regard to Harper’s Ferry, that most important strategic point on my left, and in connection with which I have not yet been able to place myself in a satisfactory attitude and connection owing to the lack of telegraph communication; of continued rail; for want of full understanding with the chief of command at that position; for want of the requisite and reliable information of all the various circumstances and conditions affecting the present military state of things at that post.

I have, since my arrival here, indicated the plan of sending Assistant Adjutant-General Jones, by rail, to-morrow, to that point, to obtain all such information, and to report to me accurately and fully the present condition of things there with as little delay as possible.

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,
Brigadier- General, Potomac Department, Commanding.

[*David R. Jones]





Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke to Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee on Moving Headquarters to Culpeper Court-House

17 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 785

Alexandria, Va., April 27, 1861.

General Lee, Commander-in-Chief:

Having succeeded in accomplishing the objects of taking up my temporary headquarters at this place, I proceed to-morrow morning to Culpeper Court-House, by the 6 o’clock train, which, as at present advised, will be my headquarters for some time to come. Colonel Jones[*], having arrived, will accompany me to Culpeper Court-House. I have arranged for my communications, through the medium of rail, wire, and courier, to headquarters, and I have, also, through a private chain of couriers (hence through Maryland to Baltimore), connected with General Steuart, in that city. My first volunteer aid, John S. Barbour, jr., remaining here, will receive dispatches at Alexandria.

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE.

[*David R. Jones]