Northern Press Reaction to Beauregard’s Proclamation

21 12 2011

Baltimore American, June 18, 1861

The most objectionable of all the pronunciamientos of the Secessionists that has come under our notice, since the beginning of the conflict, is the Proclamation of Gen. Beauregard to certain “good people” in Virginia. How any man of his standing could put his name to such a production we are at a loss to conceive. We would fain hope that it is not genuine. We would fain believe that so gross and unwarranted a misrepresentation of the purposes of the United States Government must have been foisted upon the public by some enemy of Gen. Beauregard. The publication is credited, however, to the Richmond Enquirer, and therefore leaves no doubt of its being official. Without venturing any lengthy comments upon it, we beg leave to suggest that if the prominent leaders of that side are driven to such methods of widening the breach between the sections, the cause must be low down which requires such disreputable and untruthful means to “breath into it the breath of life.”

The particular passage to which we would call the especial attention of our readers is a tolerably fair parallel to a paragraph we gave the other day from a speech made by ex-Gov. Wise, in which he invites the people of Virginia to “wade through a path of blood.” Gen. Beauregard says: “A reckless and unprincipled tyrant has invaded your soil. Abraham Lincoln, regardless of all moral, legal, and constitutional restraints, has thrown his Abolition hosts among you, who are murdering and imprisoning your citizens, confiscating and destroying your property, and committing other acts of violence and outrage too shocking and revolting to humanity to be enumerated. All rules of civilized warfare are abandoned, and they proclaim by their acts, if not on their banners, that their war-cry is “Beauty and Booty.” All that is dear to man – your honor, and that of your wives and daughters – your fortunes, and your lives, are involved in this momentous contest.”

We cannot avoid contrasting with the above the offer of General Butler to put down “servile insurrections” in his first landing at Annapolis, and the subsequent address of General Patterson to the Pennsylvania troops, that it might be their duty to “suppress servile insurrections.”

Can the people of Virginia be imposed upon by such productions as this of General Beauregard? Can any intelligent community in the South be thus cheated into madness? Surely if they can be, they are to be pitied, and we have only to say that so poor a compliment paid by any high functionary to the intelligence of the people of Maryland, would receive their scorn and reprobation.

Rebellion Record, Volume I, Documents, p 339

Beauregard’s Proclamation

Quiner Scrapbooks Online

12 12 2011

Thanks to several friends who have informed me that the Wisconsin Historical Society has digitized the Quiner Scrapbooks. These scrapbooks include newspaper clippings for various Wisconsin units. Of particular interest to Bull Runnings are those associated with the Second Wisconsin. This link will take you to the collection regarding the 2nd, starting on Volume I with the Bull Run stuff. I’ll be transcribing them here along with all the other newspaper items I have. Unfortunately, unless there is an index somewhere, the newspapers themselves are not identified, so I’ll just be referencing the Quiner scrapbook volume and page and providing a link to the images, for now.

Bull Run Illustrations

5 12 2011

Rebels Fiendishly Bayonetting Wounded Union Troops After the Battle of Bull Run

This link, sent in by reader Terrance Young, shows illustrations relating to First Bull Run which appeared in Harper’s Weekly and the New York Illustrated News. Cool stuff there – check it out. Thanks Terry!

More From Fredericksburg

3 12 2011

I’ve received another batch of newspaper clippings from John Hennessy. With this post I started on the last bunch he sent – that is, the bunch before this new bunch. So you’ll be seeing more stuff along these lines in the days ahead. Thanks again John for passing these along. And if any of you have letters or diaries or memoirs or newspaper accounts in your files, feel free to email them to me and eventually – hopefully – I’ll get them posted. Just remember, I need good details on the source. Transcriptions are fine (and save me a lot of work), but best if accompanied by an image of the original document, and information on where any unpublished material resides.

Tiger Rifles – Co. B, 1st Special Louisiana Battalion In the Battle

30 11 2011

News From The Tiger Rifles

The vivandier of the Tiger Rifles yesterday returned to this city from Manassas, and brought letters from two or three of the Tigers to their friends in this city. These letters give a detailed history of the Tiger’s sayings and doings since their departure hence, and especially their participation in the battles of Bull Run and Manassas. The loss of life among them, we are pleased to say, is much less than has been reported. They have twenty-six of their seventy-six, wholly uninjured, and several more who are but slightly wounded. That they fought like real tigers everybody admits and Gen. Johnston, it is said complimented them especially on the brave and desperate daring which they had exhibited. Lieut. Ned Hewitt reported here as having been killed, did not receive the slightest wound. Moreover, none of the officers of the Company were killed. Two of the Tigers who had been missing for several days after the fight, made their way to Manassas on Thursday last, one being slightly and other pretty badly wounded. The kindness of the Virginia ladies to the wounded soldiers is said to be beyond all praise – like that of a mother to a child or a wife to a husband. Soldiers so nursed and attended can never be anything else than heroes and conquerors.

The Daily True Delta, 8/1/1861.

Jackson Barracks – Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Vol. 113, p. 16.

Wheat’s Battalion at Stone Bridge

29 11 2011

Wheat’s Battalion at Stone Bridge

Although we have made great exertions to procure for the readers of the Bee a full report of the killed and wounded Louisianians in the great battle of Manassas Plains, it has been impossible as yet to obtain it at any outlay of trouble or expense of the Washington Artillery, all of heard; of Hayes Seventh Regiment we have scattering information of different companies; the Sixth, Colonel Seymour has few or no casualties; we know nothing concerning Colonel Kelly’s  Eight, but believe it suffered very little. Of the special battalion, under Major Robert C. Wheat, we know, also, that from its position and the necessities of the crisis, it was called upon to sacrifice itself. How it answered to the call of duty, its decimated ranks and shattered column can better tell. Its only two field officers, Major Wheat and Adjutant Dickinson, are both badly wounded at Richmond. Dickinson reported that of its four hundred men, only a quarter are left, but a correspondent who had better [means] of information writes that at roll-call, after the battle, less than half answered to their names, and that many of those who did were wounded. With the gallant Georgia Eight who suffered nearly as bad, our dauntless man charged a whole division of the enemy, composing their picked men, regulars Fire Zouaves, and their onset is described by an eye-witness “terrific”. The Tiger Rifles having no bayonets to their Mississippi Rifles, threw them away when ordered to charge, and dashed upon the Fire Zouaves with bowie knives. They are said to have been surrounded and cut to pieces.

As we have been unable up to this time to get the names of the killed and wounded we present to-day the names of the gallant men who have won for [themselves] such imperishable laurels, nearly half, [again], finding the cypress entwined with them. This spartan band will never be forgotten to Louisiana or to the South. We have an additional reason for publishing this list in the fact that a great many people do not know and are anxious to ascertain which companies composed the battalion that has been so prominently brought into notice. Wheat’s Battalion comprised five companies of bold and sturdy men who were well known to be panting for just such an opportunity as that in which they found a field for their valor at the Stone Bridge. This spirit was exhibited by one of the companies choosing their name – Tigers – which they have upheld with their knives. While in Camp here they were accounted “hard nuts to crack”, and no none doubted that they would signalize themselves in battle. Their spirit so pleased A. Keene Richards, Esq. that he fitted them out in a dashing Zouave uniform at their expense. The Catahoula Guerillas, from Trinity, were all animated with the same resolve, to win a name, even if in death. The Walker Guards were a hardy, experienced band of Nicaraguan boys who took their title from General W. Walker. The Delta Rangers and the Old Dominion Guard were crack companies of fighting men. Major Wheat has been Captain of the Old Dominions, and he took his Adjutant  from that company. We take the following list from the State muster rolls.

[Roster of Special Battalion of Louisiana Volunteers follows, see link below.]

New Orleans Bee, 8/1/1861.

Jackson Barracks – Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Vol. 113, pp. 3 – 4.

Crescent Blues In the Battle

22 11 2011

From the Seat of War in Virginia.

The Crescent Blues, and the Eighth Louisiana Regiment.

Leechman’s, near Manassas August 25th, 1861  (Extract.)

Having concluded our interview with General Beauregard we took leave of him, and proceeded towards our vehicle…and turned our horses towards Manassas station, passing on the way several encampments…We reached the station…halting our vehicles inside of the extensive fortifications thrown up around the depot…

We remained long enough to inquire after the Crescent Blues, the fine independent corps commanded by that gallant and accomplished young officer, McGavock Goodwyn. The Blues are now attached to the 49th Virginia regiment, commanded by ex-Governor Smith, of whose gallant conduct in the battle of the 21st General Beauregard speaks in the most glowing terms.

The Blues acquitted themselves very handsomely in the battle of the 21st though they complain much of the commander of the battalion to which they were attached, who would not allow them to charge when they were eager for it. It was not until Captain Goodwyn urgently entreated the Major to allow him to do a little fighting on his own hook that the Blues were allowed a chance to signalize their valor and soldiership, which they did with brilliancy and effect. They had but one man wounded.  There was no sickness in the camp of the Blues, a fact which attests the good discipline of their young commander. Let, however, the experience of the Blues admonish our young soldiers at home of the impolicy of coming on here in independent company organizations. The chances of such corps winning laurels are very poor. Nearly all those here have been detailed for special duty, generally very disagreeable duty for young soldiers; and when sent into battle, are attached to regiments and battalions whose officers and men are entire strangers to them.

A. W.

The Daily Delta, 9/3/1861.

Jackson Barracks – Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Vol. 113, pp. 159 – 160.



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