New Orleans Visit – Metairie Cemetery

4 09 2016

My wife’s second and last Civil War concession during our recent visit to the Crescent City, Metairie Cemetery proved a little frustrating. After taking the Canal Street trolley to its terminus, we de-streetcarred in an area surrounded by cemeteries (that’s why, when you are looking for which streetcar to board, you look for the one that says “Cemeteries” – $3 for a 24 hour ticket).

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You’ll have to walk about a quarter-mile or so from the streetcar stop to the cemetery’s pedestrian entrance, crossing Metairie Road and passing under I-10 in the process. This gets you to the entrance, which is very near the Civil War related “attractions” in the cemetery. Sounds simple, and it is – if the pedestrian entrance isn’t padlocked. Which, of course, it was. So, we walked a long way, maybe half a mile, up Metairie Rd looking for another entrance, and we struck out. We walked back to the entrance and checked out the option of paralleling I-10 to another entrance, but you can’t walk there. About ready to give up and head back to the streetcar, the wife called the cemetery office and about 20 minutes later a volunteer came to pick us up and take us to the main office at the north end of the cemetery. There we picked up maps (they have one geared for Civil War personalities) and set off. Of course, all the Civil War sites are in the older part of the cemetery, which is at the south end near the pedestrian entrance. The kind woman in the office told us she would have maintenance open the gate, so we would have a relatively short walk to the streetcar afterwards. Needless to say, my Fitbit was working overtime and I finished the day with over 10 miles walked, including a walk to the Superdome and a return trip to Bourbon Street.

Here are the photos. I apologize for being unable to find John Bell Hood’s grave. Also note that there are plenty of other famous folks buried here, like Al Hirt, Louis Prima, Mel Ott, the founders of Popeye’s Chicken and Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, and many more. Click on the images for bigger ones. Keep an eye out for the Easter Egg!

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Pedestrian Entrance

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Pedestrian Entrance near Army of Tennessee Memorial – Albert Sidney Johnston’s statue is visible from I-10 as you enter the city from the airport

The Washington Artillery

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The monument is inscribed with the unit’s battle honors, which include both world wars and Operation Iraqi Freedom – today it is the 141st Field Artillery Regiment

If true, very sad.

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Army of Northern Virginia

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Yes, that is Stonewall. Why? Why not!

General Richard Taylor

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Army of Tennessee Tumulus

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That is Albert Sidney Johnston atop the tomb.

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There are 48 members of the Army of Tennessee buried in the tumulus, including P. G. T. Beauregard, who jointly, solely, or subordinately commanded the Confederate forces at First Bull Run

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This Confederate officer is reading the Roll of the Dead

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I hope you’ve enjoyed this three-part travelogue. I hope some day to get back to New Orleans to see more of the sights, Civil War and otherwise. But maybe when it’s not so hot.

Lee Circle

Confederate Memorial Hall





New Orleans Visit – Confederate Memorial Hall

1 09 2016

In this post, I hipped you to my recent trip to New Orleans. After our stop outside at Lee Circle, we paid the small ($8) fee to tour Confederate Memorial Hall – Louisiana’s Civil War Museum. The exterior is nice, but the inside is very impressive – lots of wood and open timbers. Way old-school, outside of the 20 minute video presented at the end of a hallway on a flat-screen TV. So much to see, and you can check out the history of the place at their website. As with anything that is Confederate in NOLA, don’t put off seeing it until your “next trip,” as it may very well be “lost in time, like tears in rain.” Lots and lots of manicuring going on in the town.

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One odd thing – the video mentioned a vast store of documents in the basement. When I asked the attendant how one gains access for research purposes, I was told one does not. I asked why and was told the documents are historic, hence no access. Ummm, OK, I guess.

Here are some photos, and I’ll try to let them do the talking for the most part. Click on any image for great big giant versions.

First, the exterior:

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The interior:

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Jefferson Davis ephemera:

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This is the crib used by Jeff Davis as a child, also used for his children.

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First Bull Run stuff:

  • Rob Wheat and the First Special Battalion:

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Stars and Bars of the First Special Battalion

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The story goes that, after his wounding at First Bull Run, Wheat was wrapped in these colors and borne from the field…

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…and that his bloodstains are still visible today

  • 6th Louisiana Infantry

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  • 7th Louisiana Infantry

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  • 8th Louisiana Infantry

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  • Washington Artillery

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About that piece of wood (click on the image to enlarge) – it was not likely taken from Sherman’s Battery at First Bull Run, as the battery was not captured there.

  • P. G. T. Beauregard

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Odds and Ends:

  • Benjamin Butler

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  • A Piano, confiscated – or rescued – at Jackson, MS in 1863

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  • Braxton Bragg

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Any Masons in the house?

Lee Circle

Metairie Cemetery





New Orleans Visit – Lee Circle

30 08 2016

In 2016 I took a little trip, along with Mrs. Smeltzer down the mighty Mississip. We were there primarily for Bourbon St. and the Pittsburgh Steelers, but I managed to wrangle two Civil War related stops into the trip. This first was a byproduct to the second, but was so close by we really couldn’t miss it: Lee Circle. Let’s just say if you must see the monument there, you might want to do so right quick – the same with the Beauregard Equestrian statue that I did not have time to visit.

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We hopped on a tour bus (FWIW, I think you’re better off using the St. Charles streetcar – a 24 hour ticket runs 3 bucks and can be used on any line, and it’s cool to ride a national historic landmark) and got off at the WWII museum stop (which will have to be visited on our next visit). Our object was the Confederate Memorial Hall, in the city’s Warehouse District, currently being re-branded as the Arts District. You’ll see that the Hall does not appear on the above Google map, and if you take the tour bus you may notice that your guide does not mention the place even though the bus takes you right past it, and it abuts the Ogden Museum of Southern Art which our guide did point out. We backtracked through the WWII museum construction detours and before entering what is now widely referred to as the Louisiana Civil War Museum (the Hall, actually), we took a few shots of the prominent monument hard-by, dedicated to Robert E. Lee, who was described by the guide as the commander of the “Confederate Army” during the Civil War. The place seems to be a popular hangout with down-on-their-luck locals. Brown bags litter the site. Here are a few photos. Two more posts to follow.

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OK, the plaque is at best misleading. Lee did serve as General-in-Chief of all Confederate forces for a brief period in 1865, but Jefferson Davis was Commander-in-Chief from beginning to end. The monument was recently renovated, and I shudder to think what has caused the staining on this plaque – empty liquor bottles abound.

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Confederate Memorial Hall

Metairie Cemetery