Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee to Col. Eppa Hunton on Damaging Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad and Command Changes

21 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 917

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Fa., June 10,1861.

Col. Eppa Hunton, Commanding, Leesburg, Va.:

Colonel: Your letter of the 8th instant has been received, and it is hoped that you have accomplished the destruction of the bridges upon the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad, and otherwise rendered the road unserviceable to the enemy. Unless any of the rolling stock can be transferred to the Orange or Manassas Railroad, it must be destroyed immediately. Should it not already be demolished, the gondola and flats must not be permitted to fall into the hands of the enemy.

Lieut. Col. C. C. Cocke has been ordered to duty with your regiment. General G. T. Beauregard is in command of all the forces in Prince William, Fairfax, and Loudoun, through whom you should make your reports, and from whom you will receive instructions. Your letter of the 8th has been referred to him for his information and action. It is necessary to destroy the navigation of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, to prevent its being used by the enemy, and you will take measures to do so effectually, by cutting the dams at Seneca and Edwards Ferry, and blowing up the Monocacy Aqueduct.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,
General, Commanding.





#3 – Col. Maxcy Gregg

11 12 2020

Report of Col. Maxcy Gregg, 1st SOuth Carolina Infantry. [On the Action at Vienna, June 17, 1861]

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, pp 128-130

Camp near Fairfax Court-House,
June 18, 1861—1.30 a. m.

Colonel : In pursuance of orders received at 1 o’clock a. m. on the 16th of June, I proceeded in the forenoon of that day to make a reconnaissance across the country towards the Potomac. Marching from this place with my regiment (about five hundred and seventy-five strong), after leaving a large camp guard and Captain Ball’s troop of horse, numbering about seventy, including a detachment from Captain Wickham’s troop, I met at the Frying-pan Church Captain Terry’s troop of horse, about seventy strong (including a detachment of Captain Langhorne’s company), and two guns of Captain Kemper’s battery, commanded by him in person, and with thirty-four men. With this force I went on to Dranesville, learning on the way that some four hundred of the enemy came up the Alexandria and Leesburg turnpike the same day, about 1 o’clock p. m., to within a mile or two of Hunter’s Mill, and then returned.

Early in the morning of the 17th I rode with a troop of horse to the heights on this side of the Potomac, opposite to Seneca Creek, and went in person to the bank of the river to reconnoiter. I could see but few troops of the enemy, and no boats prepared for crossing the river. We marched down afterwards, under the guidance of Capt. John Powell, a high-spirited and highly intelligent and most zealous friend of our cause, to Hunter’s Mill, where, if the enemy had been engaged in repairing the railroad bridge, a plan of attack devised by Captain Powell would have offered the best chances of success. We found, however, no sign of the enemy, and only some railroad cars still smoking, which had been destroyed by our friends in the neighborhood.

We then marched to Vienna, and drew up our forces in readiness to receive the enemy if they should repeat the visit made for the last two days. Nothing being seen of them, however, and the water-tank having been demolished to increase the obstacle already caused by the removal of the lead-pipe for conveying water, I put the command in march for Fairfax Court-House.

Toward 6 o’clock p. m., just as we were moving off, a distant railroad whistle was heard. I marched the troops back, placing the two 6-pounder guns on the hill commanding the bend of the railroad, immediately supported by Company B, First South Carolina Volunteers, Lieutenant McIntosh. The rest of the regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton, was formed on the crest of the hill to the right of the guns. The cavalry were drawn up still farther to the right.

The train of cars came round the curve of the railroad into sight at the distance perhaps of four hundred yards. Captain Kemper and Lieutenant Stuart opened a rapid and well-aimed fire with the two guns, which would have been very destructive if the troops had not made a most rapid movement from the cars into the woods. Supposing that they might form and advance, I sent Companies A, Captain Miller, and E, Captain Gadberry, to deploy as skirmishers against them. Afterwards, finding that they were flying, I sent Captain Terry with his troop, guided by Mr. G. W. Hunter, a zealous friend of the cause, in pursuit. From the lateness of the hour, however, the nature of the ground, and the start which the enemy had, they could not be overtaken. Six of the enemy were found dead and one desperately wounded. Blood was also found in the bushes through which they had fled, but the darkness prevented any serious search. One passenger car and five platform cars were taken and burned. It seems from information which we gathered that five or six more cars belonging to the same train, and perhaps a number of cars in a second train, escaped by a precipitate retreat.

The wounded prisoner represented the number of the enemy’s force as eight hundred and fiftv men, and said that it was the Fifth [First] Regiment of Ohio Volunteers, commanded by Colonel McCook. Various arms, accouterments, and tools were taken, and one officer’s sword without a scabbard.

My orders requiring me to avoid any unnecessary engagement, and not to remain absent from my camp more than one night, I marched back to this place, where I arrived about 1 o’clock this morning. I have every reason to be satisfied with the conduct of all our troops. Captain Kemper’s command showed great ardor, combined with discipline. Captain Kemper’s and Lieutenant Stuart’s skill in the management of guns left. nothing to desire. Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton led the First Regiment with his usual gallantry of bearing, duly seconded by Major Smith, Lieutenant Ready (acting adjutant), and Captain McGowan, regimental quartermaster. Dr. Powell, surgeon, and Dr. Bull, assistant surgeon, had little to do, as the fire of musketry with which the enemy in scrambling out of the cars replied to our cannonade was straggling and ineffective. Major Kennedy, commissary, and Captain Tyler, volunteer on my staff, were prompt to carry orders and to give valuable counsel. The companies of Captains Miller and Gadberry, though greatly fatigued with two days’ rough march in hot sun and dust, appeared revived at once when thrown forward as skirmishers against the enemy. The same spirit was shown by all the other companies of the regiment. Lieutenant Bragg, of Company M, proved himself ready and skillful in deranging the railroad track. Captains Terry and Ball and the cavalry which they led commanded my entire confidence by their bearing, and only needed opportunity for more effective action. We arrived here about 1 o’clock this morning.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MAXCY GREGG,
Colonel First Regiment S. C. Vols., Comdg. at Fairfax Court-House.

Col. W. C. Moragne,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Centreville.





#1 – Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell

11 12 2020

Report of Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell, U. S. Army. [On the Action at Vienna, June 17, 1861]

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, pp 124-125

Headquarters Department Northeastern Virginia,
Arlington, June 18, 1861.

I have the honor to inclose a copy of my written instructions to General Schenck, under which his movement was made yesterday afternoon. The point to which it was intended the regiment should go by train, and establish itself for the twenty-four hours, had been occupied, for the day before, by the Sixty-ninth New York Regiment, under Colonel Hunter, commanding the brigade. The latter regiment had been sent there, on the return of General Tyler from his reconnaissance up the road, as an advance guard and a protection to the road, which had been repaired in anticipation of the demonstration I was to make on the notification of the General-in-Chief in favor of the attack on Harper’s Ferry. It is said the attack on the Ohio regiment was made by the South Carolinians. If so, they must have been moved forward from Centreville, where they have been stationed for some time past. This would seem to indicate that the reports of an advance of troops to their posts in front of this position are well founded. I have asked if it would accord with the plans of the General-in-Chief that a movement be made in force in the direction of Vienna, near which the attack was made. I learn from a reliable source that the force at Fairfax Court-House has been increased. Had the attack not been made, I would not suggest this advance at this time; but now that it has, I think it would not be well for us to seem even to withdraw. General Schenck applies for permission to send a flag of truce to Vienna to bury his dead and care for his wounded. I do not think this necessary for either purpose, but think the morale of the troops would be increased if they went over the ground again with arms in their hands. The distance by turnpike from Falls Church to Vienna is about six miles.

General Tyler, who is in advance, sends me word that he sees the country as far as Falls Church. No signs of any movement. He wants no more troops than he has, unless it is intended to hold permanently the position he occupies.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Irvin McDowell,
Brigadier General, Commanding.

Lieut. Col. E. D. Townsend,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Army, Washington.

[Inclosure.]

Headquarters Department Northeastern Virginia,
Arlington, June 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General Schenck, Commanding Ohio Brigade:

Sir: The general commanding directs that you send one of the regiments of your command, on a train of cars, up the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad to the point where it crosses the wagon-road running from Fort Corcoran, opposite Georgetown, southerly into Virginia.

The regiment, being established at that point, will, by suitable patrols, feel the way along the road towards Falls Church and Vienna, moving, however, with caution, and making it a special duty to guard effectually the railroad bridges and to look to the track. The regiment will go supplied for a tour of duty of twenty-four hours, and will move on the arrival at your camp of a train of cars ordered for that purpose, and will relieve all the troops of Colonel Hunter’s brigade now guarding the line.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY,
Assistant Adjutant-General.





Col. George H. Terrett to Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee on the Federal Occupation of Alexandria

11 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

REPORTS, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 43

No. 5. Reports of Col. George H. Terrett, C. S. Forces, commanding at Alexandria.

Manassas, Va., May 24,1861.

The Northern troops, six thousand strong, marched into Alexandria at 4.30 o’clock this morning. The Virginia forces, five hundred in number, retreated in good order, their rear guard in sight of and within two hundred yards of the advance guard of the enemy. A large cavalry force crossed the Chain Bridge at 12 o’clock last night. Destination supposed to be somewhere on the line of the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad.

GEO. H. TERRETT.

Major-General Lee.

[Filed here as Official Correspondence, but in the Official Records as Reports.]





Brig. Gen. Milledge L. Bonham to Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee on Destroying Bridges on Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad

9 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

REPORTS, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 42

No. 5. Reports of Brig. Gen. M. L. Bonham, C. S. Army, commanding at Manassas, Va.

Manassas, Va., May 24, 1861.

Dispatch received.* Colonel Terrett says two troops of cavalry crossed the Chain Bridge about 12 o’clock in the night. I have ordered some dragoons of Captain Green’s company to burn the bridges as soon as practicable. Will immediately send your dispatch to Colonel Hunton, however, who I hope has already accomplished the object. If you can, send some good artillerist and an engineer.

M. L. BONHAM.

General Lee.

*Of same date. See “Correspondence, etc.,” post.

[Filed here as Official Correspondence, but in the Official Records as Reports.]





Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee to Brig. Gen. Milledge L. Bonham on Destroying Bridges on Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad

8 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 872

Richmond, Va., May 24, 1861.

General Bonham, Manassas Junction, Va.:

Send an express to Colonel Hunton, at Leesburg, to destroy all the bridges of the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad as far down towards Alexandria as possible, and to keep you and General Johnston advised of the movements of the enemy towards Harper’s Ferry.

R. E. LEE,
Major-General, Commanding.





Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee to Col. George H. Terrett on Securing Rolling Stock

6 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 866

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 22, 1861.

Col. George H. Terrett, Commanding, &c., Alexandria, Va.:

Colonel: Unless you can devise some better plan for securing the rolling stock of the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad than that, suggested to you in my letter of the 19th instant, I desire you to adopt it, and give directions that a track be laid from the depot of the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad to the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, in Union street, or some other more convenient point, by which this rolling stock can be carried to a place of safety on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad when not wanted for use on its proper road, and confer with presidents and directors of said roads as to perfecting this connection, which will not only be useful for the above purpose, but afford convenient transportation from one road to the other.

Very respectfully, &c.,

R. E. LEE,
Major-General, Commanding.





Lt. Col. John A. Washington, Aide-de-Camp, to Col. George H. Terrett, on Securing Rolling Stock

5 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 858

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 19, 1861.

Lieut. Col. George H. Terrett,
Commanding at Alexandria, Va.:

Colonel: Major-General Lee instructs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of May 16*. It is very important to secure the rolling stock of the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad, but General Lee thinks it would be quite as much exposed to seizure by the enemy at any point on that road near Alexandria as in the town itself. If taken up that road for safety, it should be taken to Leesburg or its vicinity. General Lee thinks it would be better (if practicable) to obtain the co-operation of the Alexandria, Loudoun and Hampshire and the Alexandria and Orange Railroad Companies in the construction of a temporary track connecting the two roads, to run the cars of the Loudoun and Hampshire Road out on the track of the Orange and Alexandria Road at night, as a precautionary measure.

I am, &c.,

JNO. A. WASHINGTON, Aide-de-Camp.

*Not found.