Preview – Pula, “Under the Crescent Moon” Vol. 2

5 11 2018


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James Pula’s Under the Crescent Moon with the XI Corps in the Civil War Volume 2 From Gettysburg to Victory, 1863 – 1865, picks up after the Battle of Chancellorsville, where Volume 1 left off. You get:

  • 323 pages if narrative in 21 chapters. Note that 299 pages of the narrative take us to the relief of Knoxville in December 1863, after which the 11th and 12th corps, after which the 11th (that’s right, they didn’t use Roman numerals for corps designation back in the day) and 12th corps were consolidated into the new 20th corps.
  • Addendums for 11th Corps numbers and losses at Gettysburg.
  • Addendum with 11th Corps order of battle for Chattanooga.
  • Addendum listing 11th Corps Medal of Honor Awardees.
  • Bottom of page footnotes.
  • Bibliography (numerous archival sources were consulted).
  • Full index
  • Five maps – an improvement over Volume 1, but I need more.

 





Another Galley

6 06 2018

Layout 1

Just in from Savas Beatie is an unedited advance galley of James Pula’s Under the Crescent Moon with the XI Corps in the Civil War: Volume 2: From Gettysburg to Victory, 1863-1865. This is the second of the two-volume study, the first of which was previewed here. So, you can get the picture if you refer to that post. My main criticism of the first volume was a lack of detailed maps, a staple of Savas Beatie publications. While a skimming of this galley shows some improvement, it’s still not quite up to standards in that regard. The proof will be in the final product, as always.





Preview: Pula, “Under the Crescent Moon, Vol. 1”

21 11 2017

Layout 1Under the Crescent Moon with the XI Corps in the Civil War: Volume 1: From the Defenses of Washington to Chancellorsville, 1862-1863 is James Pula’s first in a planned two-part study of what was at the time known as the Eleventh Corps of the U. S. Army in the Civil War (the Roman numeral is a post-war affectation not used here at Bull Runnings). In this volume, the promotional material states, the actions of the Corps at the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863 “are fully examined here for the first time, and at a depth no other study has attempted.” Considering the thoroughness of John Bigelow’s background on the Corps in The Campaign of Chancellorsville, and the depth of analysis in Augustus C. Hamlin’s The Attack of Stonewall at Chancellorsville, the proof of this claim will be in the pudding. Mr. Pula has previously written about 11th Corps related topics, including a biography of Wlodzimierz Krzyzanowski and a history of the 26th Wisconsin Infantry.

What you get:

  • 281 pages of text in nine chapters taking the history of the Corps up to June, 1863;
  • An appendix listing the casualties of the Corps during the Battle of Chancellorsville;
  • An appendix listing the German troops in the Corps;
  • A ten page bibliography, including two full pages of archival sources;
  • Same-page footnotes;
  • Numerous, mostly portrait photos.
  • (There appears to be only one detailed disposition/movement map in total, which is curious in a work that seeks to look at the Corps’ performance at Chancellorsville in depth. In contrast, the Hamlin book noted above has nine.)

Volume 2 of this history, release date not known, is expected to be 432 pages.