Brig. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Brig. Gen. Samuel Cooper on Enemy Advancing on his Front

30 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 969

Headquarters,
Winchester, July 9, 1861—7 p. m.

General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General:

General: I have just been informed by Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart, commanding our cavalry, that he has reason to believe that the enemy intends to advance upon us to-night (the distance is but twenty-two miles). The evidences are that it is the belief of the people living near the town, ascertained by his pickets, and that three days’ provisions were issued to-day, and that a United States lieutenant had mentioned it.

We are not prepared beyond the readiness of our men to fight. The field works have not been progressed with far enough to make them useful, and the militia is not provided with fixed ammunition, having received but powder and lead.

Most respectfully, &c.,

J. E. JOHNSTON.





Brig. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Brig. Gen. Samuel Cooper on Need for Cavalry and Staff

29 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 962-963

Headquarters,
Winchester, July 2, 1861.

General S. Cooper:

General: I become more convinced daily of the great value of cavalry, compared with infantry, for service on this frontier. The quantity we have is entirely insufficient for mere scouting and outpost duty. If you can send companies enough to make up another regiment under such an officer as Colonel Stuart, you will add vastly to the strength of this force. We cannot observe the river with one regiment.

Do send me Pemberton immediately, or, if he cannot be spared, Major Rhett. I have no adjutant-general. Can you not appoint and send to me two more such as Bee and Smith ? They are to be found—Pemberton, for instance.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,
Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.





Brig. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Brig. Gen. Samuel Cooper on Federal Activity in Maryland and Relocation of His Command

26 12 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 934

Headquarters Camp Bunker Hill,
June 17, 1861.

General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.:

General: On the morning of the 16th intelligence was received, apparently reliable, that no enemy is advancing on Romney, and that the large body of troops collected near Hagerstown would cross the Potomac yesterday. The troops under my command were therefore directed to this point, on the road from Hagerstown to Winchester, the main route from Maryland into the valley of Virginia. We are twelve miles in advance of Winchester. My only hope from this movement is a slight delay in the enemy’s advance. I believe his force to be about 18,000; ours is 6,500. Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart, commanding our small body of cavalry, sent me intelligence last night that the Federal troops encamped yesterday afternoon about eight miles from Martinsburg (seventeen miles from this place) on this road.

I will endeavor to conform as nearly as circumstances may permit to the instructions received from you on the 15th. The want of ammunition has rendered me very timid.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,
Brigadier General, C. S. Army.

P. S. — Colonel Thomas, who will deliver this to you, goes to expedite a supply of ammunition for small-arms. We have about thirty rounds.