C. A. M., Co. B, 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, On the Eve of the Campaign

24 11 2016

Letter of the 2d. New Hampshire Regiment.
———-

Washington, D. C.,
July 4, 1861.*

Messrs. Editors: I will write you a few lines this week, though not much of interest has transpired during the last few days, with, perhaps, the exception of the arrival of a paymaster in our camp, who just at this time is a very welcome visitor. To day the soldiers are being paid off, the idea of which is cheering, for many of us are getting short of change, which comes in handy even here in buying many of the smaller comforts of life with which we have been obliged to dispense with. Paying the soldiers thus promptly, seems to inspire them with new confidence and vigor, and all will fight the better for it.

Sunday the 7th, Mr. Parker** preached to us from the Acts of the Apostles, chapt. 16, verse 28th – “Do thyself no harm.” The application of which he made was that all of us should act in the same spirit to each other as Paul did towards the jailor who drew his sword in despair to slay himself when he saw his prisoners about to escape. Paul had the spirit of goodness in him which he showed even then when smarting under cruelties imposed upon him by those who were his enemies. Now, he said, when far away from the kind influences of home, we should exercise the same spirit towards ourselves. This we could do in abstaining from all the trends to demoralize us, from the many vicious practices to which the most of soldiers were addicted. Take these words, he said, as a rule of life – Do thyself no harm – and a glorious reward would be ours. Now when surrounded by ten thousand temptations, it would tend to develop our strength of character. Then, he said, while he was speaking, if every fathers ear could hear his voice, he would thank him for giving his boy this advice, and every blessed mother and sister left behind, would feel it an honor for any injury that might happen to the son and brother, at the hands of any rebel, if he kept from temptation and did himself no harm. Here lies the danger, It was an excellent discourse, and left an impression on those who hear it that will not soon be forgotten.

Tuesday afternoon, the regiment were favored with a speech from Gen. Wilson*** of California, a noble son of the old Granite State, who said he was proud of being here and seeing faces many of which were familiar to him. He came a son of New Hampshire to speak to New Hampshire soldiers in whom he took a great interest, though sixty-four years had taken away something of his manhood strength, still he meant to follow them in their marches and their battles, that when he returned to their native State he might tell her people how well her sons stood the trial. He had fill confidence in them. He spoke something like an hour, and was listened to with marked attention throughout. He was applauded frequently, and when he spoke of his daughter, who sat near us, as also taking a deep interest in us and of praying for our welfare, the cheers were absolutely deafening. At its close cheer upon sheer arose for the speaker, and the daughter who took such an interest in us. Gen. Wilson often visits our camp and is quite a favorite with both officers and men.

Yesterday was the holy Sabbath, and how sweet to my ears would have been the sound of the village church bell; everything reminds me that I am out of New England, every voice, and face, and sound I hear (except in our own regiment) are strangers. To-day I have been led to think of this more than at any time before. I know not why it is unless it is that I have loved my native hills and voices of those with whom I have been accustomed to associate more than I ought. No this cannot be; I have loved them I hope truly, but not too well. Dear old New New Hampshire; there is no land on the face of the wide earth like her, no hills from which the fresh breezes blow sweeter, no people whose hearts are warmer or who can take the hand with a firmer grasp in token of the kind friendship so peculiar to her, though I have seen hills whose sides were not so steep and rugged, tho’ I many have seen in this southern clime men and women who may be more polished but not more refined, still my heart clings to her; she shall never be disgraced by those she had sent forth in this hour of our country’s peril to fight her battles. We can strike with a truer and firmer stroke at traitor hearts, we can sight with an aim more exact at those who seek to destroy our common country when we think what a kind mother she has been to us. God bless her! I have no doubt is said in his own heart by every one of her two thousand sons who are now in the field ready for the contest this day. We were expecting to march to-day at 1 o’clock, the time has been postponed until to-morrow at 1 when no doubt every man that can go will, for all are anxious. Where we are to go none of us know. Wherever it may be we will try to do our duty, only hoping that we may not be exposed needlessly, and everything be planned in good judgment as no doubt it will be. The whole nation has full confidence in the noble old General at the head of her armies.

Yesterday, Mr. Parker preached to us from Proverbs 18th chapter and 10th verse – “The name of the Lord is a strong tower, the nations runneth into it and are safe” – and a good discourse it was too. Mr. Parker is a good man and well liked by the regiment; we hope his labors in our behalf will be productive of good as certainly they deserve to be.

Since I wrote you last we have had a change in our culinary department, Austin Sanger having declined and appointed postmaster for the regiment, and a good appointment too, his place being supplied by Roberts, who understands his business – even now I hear the welcome sound i”fall in for supper”i so I must close for to-night.

Tuesday morning – This morning we are told that it is sure that we are to march at 1 P. M. all are busy in making preparations for departure in rolling up their blankets &c., we are to take four days rations in our haversacks, so we think we are to have something of a march. The whole regiment are all in good spirits, singing and cheering at the prospect of having something to break the monotony of the camp life we have had for the three weeks we have been here. None are in better spirits or more anxious to go than the Goodwin Rifles. It is possible these orders may be countermanded, we hope not. Good bye for this time, you shall hear from me again.

Yours,

C. A. M.****

Concord Independent Democrat, 7/25/1861

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*This appears to be the date that this letter was begun. It appears to end the day on which the movement to Manassas began, July 16, 1861.

**Chaplain Henry E. Parker in A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry

***Likely Congressman James Wilson. Sketch of General James Wilson of New Hampshire

****There are four C. A. M.’s listed in the regimental roster who were in the regiment at this time (plus numerous C. M.s, no middle initial). Two were in the Goodwin Rifles, Co. B: Pvt. Charles A. Mace and Sgt. Charles A. Milton .

A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





“Corporal Trim,” 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, On the Advance

23 11 2016

Our Army Correspondence – – No. 5.
———-

In Camp, four miles from Centreville,
Twelve miles from Manassas Junction,
Friday, July 19, 1861.

Dear Independent: I am writing under difficulties, first, there is not table or even a board to write on, so I write on the crown of my cap holding it in my lap, as I sit leaning against a stack of guns while the sweat runs down and drops off my beard. We started from Camp Sullivan, Tuesday the 16th inst., about noon, marched to Washington where we united with the Rhode Island Regiments, 1st and 2d, and the New York 71st with several companies of regulars and the U. S. Light Artillery. We began to feel good as we field across the long bridge and came insight of the extensive earth works which cover all the heights on the Virginia side near the bridge or at any point of crossing on the river. The troops at work on the entrenchments gave us cheer after cheer as we passed them and at a quick step and with right good will we pushed on into Old Virginia. About 10 in the evening we went into camp, spread our blankets, and slept sweetly without being disturbed. The next morning we were up at the dawn, and after hard bread and meat again resumed our march. A fight was in prospect at Fairfax, and as we drew near the renowned spot we got our men in order and marched on still and quiet, without music. Soon a long line of earth works came in sight on the brow of a hill, but instead of its belching forth shot and shell upon us as we filed through the narrow valley, all was still, and the grand fortification showed itself no more belligerent than any other big pile of dirt. Soon our men were upon the works, but not a single soldier of the ten or twelve thousand said to have been at this place could be seen, all had left. In a few moments more we found ourselves in Fairfax. That renowned depot of Southern troops looked about as lonesome as the fortifications, for nothing of the human kind could be seen save a few negroes, and now and then a woman or child peaking from the windows. We passed through the grand street of the town, consisting of six or eight buildings, into the Court House yard, where we stacked arms, and the command was given, rest! Thus we found ourselves in possession of Fairfax Court House, and all without firing a gun or shedding any thing but sweat which was poured out pretty freely to be sure. The Colonel and staff took possession of the Court House and our regimental colors were planted upon the roof in the midst of prolonged shouts.

We learned that the Southern troops left about two hours before our arrival. On visiting the deserted camps we found they must be left in the greatest haste, as much valuable property was left, provisions, clothing, blankets, tents, &c. The boys found revolvers and knives, a few matches, some rolls of dimes and quarters where they had been paying off &c. Nearly every one had some sort of trophy. In some places they left their breakfast all ready, table set, and the “hoe cake baked,” in other cases they had only got the dough mixed up ready for baking. – Flour meal, beef, pork, corn and other stores showed that food was abundant with the rebels. The men got so excited in the plunder of the camp that they did not respect private property as they should; where they learned any one was in the Southern interest they went in and helped themselves. As soon as the officers learned what was going on they at once stationed guards and put every man under arrest who was found plundering, and did all they could to prevent any outrage, but enough was done I fear to give us a bad name. The orders now are very strict and the greatest care is taken to have all private property respected.

Thursday, the 18th, we marched from Fairfax to this point, which is about four miles from Centreville, and the same distance from Bulls Run which is the strong position of the rebels for the protection of Manassas Junction. The day we got here three companies of the Massachusetts 1st got into an ambush and were badly cut up. The Boston Fusileers, a company of one hundred and one, had but twenty-one men reported up to noon to-day, and the other two companies suffered but not so severely. There is the greatest excitement among the troops, some 60,000 being encamped within four or five miles, all they ask is orders to go on and clean them out. Old Gen. Scott come out to-day and says he shall not permit a single life to be rashly thrown away, that more lives have been lost now than we needed to take the whole of Bull Run, Manassas Gap and all. Bull Run is a very important point to the Southerners, as they get all their water for the Manassas Gap Railroad and for the use of the troops at that station, from this same Bull Run. The rebel troops are stationed in a large wood and they have batteries erected all about, and the position is very strong to hold for a short time, and cannot well be taken without a risk of considerable loss. The cars from Richmond have been run night and day of late bringing on reinforcements. It is thought that no other stand will be made after Bull Run and Manassas Gap until we get to Richmond. The troops are terribly excited, it is fearful to see men with the tiger fully aroused in them. To-morrow we expect to go in on Bull Run in some way, but nothing can be known previous to orders.

Gen. Wilson (long Jim)* was here today with Hon. T. M. Edwards**. Gen. Wilson seems unable to leave us. God bless his great heart, how much I wish he was in his prime. I reckon he would not leave us as long as the war lasted. I don’t know as he will now. Our men are in good health. The climate is not going to kill us. We are all right in that direction.

Ever yours,

CORPORAL TRIM.***

Concord Independent Democrat, 7/25/1861

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*Likely Congressman James Wilson. Sketch of General James Wilson of New Hampshire

**Likely Congressman Thomas M. Edwards Wikipedia 

***No individual named Trim is listed in the company roster, so this is likely a pseudonym.

A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





“Juvenis,” Battery A (Reynolds), 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, On the Battle and Retreat

22 11 2016

Army Correspondence.

Camp near Harper’s Ferry, Aug. 5th, 1861.

Mr. Editor: – I hope you have not thought that, because I have not contributed lately to your paper I was among the fallen at the battle of Bull Run. True, I was in that battle, and in the thickest of the fight for five long hours; but no missile of death was allowed by my Heavenly Father to strike me down. Members of my own company and of my own mess fell at my side, the shells burst at my feet, the spent musket balls struck me, but I am still unscathed, ready for another conflict with my country’s enemies; ready for the life long conflict with the enemy of souls, ready I hope to proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ to lost men.

It seems strange to me, that even the presence of death has no effect upon the minds of men. One can still hear the same coarse jests, the same profane language, the same taunts at those who speak to them of religion, as before they were surrounded by the dead and dying.

We are now encamped in a lovely place; the mountains of the Blue Ridge are on every side except where the Potomac winds through them. We have taken the 1st R. I. Battery, as their time is up, and our battery with the exception of one piece, was lost at the battle of Bull Run. Perhaps your readers would like to have a short account of that battle, which was one of the bloodiest in American history.

We were encamped between Fairfax and Centerville, and expected to remain there for some time. We had built our huts of branches, our fire places and cranes were ready for use. Sunday morning at on o’clock the bugle sounded, and the battery was harnessed up. We mounted the boxes and silently wound along the road towards Manassas Junction. There was no music, no loud command; our General wished to steal a march on the enemy. We were confident of victory, as we had confidence in our commander. We took a circuitous path through the woods, and without once having halted during the march of twelve miles, we reached the field of battle. The Rhode Island troops had the right of the line, the 2nd regiment in advance, the 1st next in order with our battery between. The first notice we had of the presence of the enemy was the volley of musketry from the woods upon our lines. The 2d regiment charged and drove them from the woods, down the hill. We were instantly ordered into action. We got into battery as quickly as possible and engaged a battery about a third of a mile from us. We soon silenced that and engaged the enemy in other parts of the field. The battle grew hotter and hotter – thicker and thicker flew the bullets, the shot, the shell. Our horses suffered severely, our men at the guns were entirely exhausted, wounded or dead. We were so thirsty that we threw ourselves into the mudy brooks and eagerly swallowed the mud and water. The enemy were retreating on every hand. Already Beauregard had sent a dispatch to Richmond, and even while we were fighting, Jeff Davis was packing up his State papers to send them to a place of safety. Bu all day there had been a constant stream of reinforcements pouring into the woods where the rebels had their head quarters. All at once the celebrated black horse cavalry charged upon us, their fresh infantry poured their volley into our ranks, their masked batteries opened upon our flank; thick as hail the shot flew; four hundred of the Zouaves were cut down. We retreated. We ran before that stream of lead and iron. No man could stand such a fire as that. The retreat became a rout; all were mingled together in dire confusion; the road was crowded with fugitives; the wounded, the wearied all rushed along together. We brought our battery off the field, and dozens of wounded men climbed upon our boxes and pieces, some with broken arms, some with broken legs, some with the blood flowing down their faces, some with their clothes red with blood. We were obliged to leave many a poor wounded, dying man who beseechingly begged us to take him upon our boxes. Those that were free from wounds were panic struck. At the least alarm every man almost would flee for his life, not knowing where he went. Thus we passed slowly along. We came out of those long woods, the dust in the road was so thick that nothing before us could be seen. We began to hope that the enemy would not disturb us, for now we had reached the direct road to Centerville, and our reserve was two or three miles before us. It began to grow dusky, for the thick dust and the woods on either side of the road hid the setting sun; all at once into that dense mass of men, horses and wagons, the enemy from a masked battery poured their shell; the musketry opened upon them; their cavalry charged upon them. What a scene! We were just at the bridge, but upon it was piled the government baggage wagons. We could not pass with our battery; for it was a narrow bridge, and there were deep gullies on each side. Our drivers cut the traces, we left the wounded men to save our own lives, and helter skelter we dashed on towards Centerville. The cavalry of the enemy charged upon us, and many a poor soldier fell before their sabres. We soon met the reserve coming up under Colonel Miles, but still we hurried on through that long dark night; morning dawned, and still we had not halted; Washington and the long bridge hove in sight, and we sank down upon the ground exhausted! for we had eaten nothing since Saturday. We had marched ten or twelve miles to the battle field without halting, we had fought through that hot day, we had marched nearly forty miles from the battle field to Washington. Thus we fought, thus we retreated.

I will not say upon whose head a terrible retribution should be visited. We long for an opportunity to wipe off the disgrace of that day.

O! how much pleasanter we spent the hours of the last Sabbath (the 4th inst.) Though separated from our regiment, we had religious services. We repaired to a huge pile of rocks shaded by tall trees, and there one of our number preached to to us the gospel of Christ. It seemed lik a heaven below.

Juvenis.*

Boston Christian Era, 8/16/1861

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*In Latin, Juvenis is a young man or a youth. The root of juvenile.

The History of Battery A, First Regiment Rhode Island Light Artillery

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Surgeon George H. Hubbard, 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, Casualty List for the Regiment

21 11 2016

List of Killed, Wounded, and Missing of the N. H. Second Regiment

———-

Dr. George H. Hubbard, Surgeon of the Second N. H. Regiment furnishes to the Manchester Mirror the following list of the killed, wounded and missing of that Regiment. He writes under date of July 27th:

Mr. John B. Clark – Dear Sir: – The following is a list of the killed, wounded and missing of the 2d N. H. Regiment, as far as at present ascertained. Some of the missing will very likely turn up alive:

KILLED.

John L. Rice, Co. A; Pat Kearns, Frank A. Eastman, Henry Tebbets, George Langtree, Co. H; Harvey Holt, Henry L. Morse, Co. I.

WOUNDED.

Col. Gilman Marston, right arm broken by a musket ball; Capt. Hiram Rollins, musket ball through top shoulder; Isaac W. Derby lost left arm, Daniel W. Whittein wounded in leg, Co. A; Jos. Ayer wounded in leg, John F. Lord wounded in head, Stephen Deshan, wounded slightly in breast, John O. Hayes wounded slightly in head, James M. Venner wounded slightly in head, Co. D; C. J. Marshall w. in foot (left a prisoner), W. F. Oxford w. in leg do., Oliver F. Allen w. in breast do., Co. K; Wm. H. Quimby, w. in leg and left a prisoner, Lewis N. Relation w. in leg do., Josiah Burleigh w. in arm do., Andrew M. Connell w. in head do., Alfred W. Berhan w. in breast, in Alexandria hospital, F. F. Wetherbee, w. in leg and left a prisoner, Co. C; Andrew J. Straw w. in leg, John Straw wounded in the leg, Hugh Lewis wounded in breast, Thomas Finnegan w. in breast, James B. Silver w. in arm Co. H; Henry M. Gordon w. in hand, Wm. Haley w. in wrist, Jos. C. Meserve w. in hand, W. H. Morrill w. in hand, Wm. H. H. Story w. in hand, Co. E; Charles Buck w. in shoulder (at Alexandria), Geo. S. Chase, w. fingers, Chas. H. Chase w. fatally in thigh and left prisoner, Cyrus W. Merrill do., do., W. H. F. Staples w. in arm, S. R. Tibbetts w. in hand, Co. F; Henry A. Bowman foot shot off and left a prisoner, Nelson Hurd badly wounded and left a prisoner, John Hagan w. in the side, Daniel Aldrich w. in left shoulder, Co. G; Frank K. Wasley w. in fingers, L. P. Hubbard w. in fingers, Chas. F. Lawrence w. in head, Co. I; Chas. Holmes w. in shoulder, Charles Cooper w. in thigh, left prisoner, Co. B.

Co. B – Charles Wilkins wounded in shoulder; Charles Hammond, wounded in hip; Wells C. Haynes, severely wounded in thigh – missing.

MISSING.

George S. Heaton, Dana S. Jaquith, Charles Sebastian, George H. Whitman, John F. Wheeler, of Co. A; Jacob Hall, H. H. Emerson, Alden T. Kidder, A. D. Leathers, Henry West, Christy L. Jones, of Co. D; Charles Ridge, Samuel Adams, Geo. Sawyer, Jr., of Co. K; F. R. Tucker, Kimball Ball, John Davis, Thurlow A. Emerson, John A. Barker, Elbin Lord wounded, Woodbury Lord wounded, Wm. H. Walker wounded, Wm. H. Connor wounded, Heman Allen, Louis G. Barker, Galen A. Grout, Samuel M. Joy, Timothy Saxton, of Co. A; Levi W. Colbath, Simeon M. Heath, Joseph R. Morse, of Co. E; L. W. Brackett, Geo. L. Dow, of Co. F; Alonzo B. Balley, of Co. G; Moses L. Eastman wounded, A. R. Robinson, John Berry, Albert Hall, Reuben F. Stevens of Co. I; Charles H. Perry, Thomas E. Barker, Wyman Holden, Hery Moore, John L. Fitz, George H. Clay, George C. Emerson of Co. B.

Col Marston is doing well – expect to save his arm. We lost all we carried on to the field, except instruments.

Our ambulances were fired on by cannon during the retreat, and we were forced to leave them and run for our lives.

Yours Truly,

Geo. H. Hubbard

Concord Democrat, 8/1/1861

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A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry 

George H. Hubbard at Rootsweb

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Pvt. John. W. Odlin, Co. B, 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, On the Campaign

20 11 2016

Letter from the 2d New Hampshire Regiment.

———-

Camp Sullivan, July 25, 1861.

Dear Friends: – I am just recovered from my fatigue of yesterday and the few preceding days to write a connected account of what I have done and seen; but if I were to picture the scenes fully and accurately, the recital would fill a volume. We started Tuesday at 1 1/2 o’clock P. M. and marched into the “Old Dominion.” After a walk of about 10 miles we camped upon the ground: and on the next morning receiving orders, we marched about 10 miles more to Fairfax, which had been evacuated about two hours before. We had to clear the road of trees and stones placed to blockade it, and passed some formidable fortifications, also deserted. That night we slept under the shadow of the Court House, from which the flag of our regiment waved in place of a “Secesh” which was pulled down by Capt. Barker of Co. A. Early upon the next morning we started off again and encamped about 1 mile this side of Centreville, where a skirmish had taken place the day before. Here we slept two nights, and upon Sunday morning at 2 o’clock we again proceeded in the direction of the enemy, and after a tedious tramp of 10 or 12 miles outflanked them, and then the battle commenced. I suppose you have seen accounts of it and the unfortunate panic which was the sole cause of our retreat and defeat. We were ordered first into an open field on the right hand, just opposite a battery of the enemy, and a large body of infantry drawn up in line of battle, and without firing a shot were exposed to their galling fire. The cannon balls flew whistling by – shells burst over our heads – and the rifle and musket bullets flew just like hail. Here we did not lose many men, for the shots were mostly too high; and soon Lt. Col. Fiske took up the line of march for the other side of the road which intersected the field of battle, where we were in some measure protected by the guns of the Rhode Island Battery. Here the work of death in our ranks commenced, and a private in Co. H. was the first to fall, struck by a bullet in the temple, causing instantaneous death; and then in quick succession began to fall, the New Hampshire boys. – Our regiment was then marched, with the others composing the brigade, nearer the enemy, when they dealt as good as they received. The Goodwin Rifles and the Abbot Guards of Manchester, Co. I. together went up to within forty rods of a house which stood in the midst of their entrenchments and shot down the Secession flag twice, being all the time exposed to one of the terrible masked batteries, which were the only drawbacks to our victorious progress. Things went on quite favorably to our side till that unfortunate panic took place among our teamsters, (not our regimental ones,) but the army wagoners who commenced to drive pell mell towards this city – in some cases cutting the traces and mounting the horses, and riding as for dear life.

This fright was of course communicated to the soldiers and the retreat commenced in the utmost disorder, wagons, soldiers straggling along, artillery piece by piece, and ambulances filled to their brims with the wounded hurrying along, their inmates making the night hideous with their groans and cries, all conspired to make a scene which I shall never forget. At the bridge over Bull Run where we cut off to flank the enemy, the rear of the retreating column was fired upon by a rifled cannon which killed one or two horses of the R. I. Battery and caused the guns to pile up in an inextricable mass, cutting off some of the wagons and making a confusion altogether beyond the power of words to describe. They made no other attack, at least no organized one, although they may have harrassed our men some with cavalry.

In this way we came to the city, where we arrived all the way from 1 o’clock Monday A. M. till now; and all the men are not here yet. The N. Y. 69th and the Ellsworth Zouaves are the worst cut up, having made several charges upon the batteries of the enemy.

The Zouaves made 3 or 4 charges, which were never equalled in the annals of war. They were attacked by 600 Rebel “Black Horse” Cavalry and they killed or dismounted every one but six, capturing hundreds of splendid army revolvers, which they gave freely to all around them on the retreat; and they took a strong battery of rifled guns by a most splendid movement, but owing to overpowering numbers were obliged to relinquish it.

Our own company was not idle during the engagement, for our rifles told with the most deadly effect upon their ranks, and our boys charged up to the banks near the hill followed by Co. I., which I before mentioned, and from behind the fences picked them off fast.

Our Captain behaved gallantly throughout the whole affair, as did our Lieutenant – the latter taking as he did the place of our lamented Walker, was true to his memory, and acted with a coolness which throws lustre upon his character. Both of our officers proved themselves men, and worthy of the cause in which they are engaged. Col. Marston was wounded in the arm but notwithstanding that, he was again upon the field commanding his men in person.

Our regiment is quite fortunate, only 25 or 30 missing. Some of our Company have not yet come in. Holden of West Concord, Haynes, son of Sheriff Haynes, Fitts and Emerson of Candia, and Clay of the same place. The tree latter are probably only prisoners at the worst. Charley Cooper was wounded in the thigh, not dangerous, who with one or two others, some of whom are mentioned above, are all of our Company injured.

The scene on the field I will not attempt, as imagination can picture it much more like reality. But we are thankful that we are no worse off, and shall soon be ready to tackle them again under better circumstances.

J. W. O.*

Concord Democrat, 8/1/1861

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*The only J. W. O. in the roster is Private John W. Odlin of Co. B. The members of his company named are also in the Goodwin Rifles, Co. B.

John W. Odlin at Fold 3 

A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry 

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Major Josiah Stevens, Jr., 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, On the Battle

19 11 2016

Letter from Maj. Stevens.

—————

We are permitted to make the following extract from a letter of Maj. Josiah Stevens, Jr., of the Second Regiment, to his father, Col. Josiah Stevens, of this city, dated –

Washington, July 23, 1861.

I am, as you see, once more in Washington, having, as you are aware, seen a battle. We started at 2 A. M., on Sunday morning, from our camp ground, and made a march of 9 miles without anything except hard bread to eat, and at about 10 1-2 o’clock the ball opened. We came upon the enemy upon an eminence that commanded the whole country, with 60,000 men and 150 pieces of cannon. Our force consisted of 18,000 men and 20 pieces of cannon. We fought until 5 P. M., and found it impossible to capture the place.

They showered upon us a complete hailstorm of shot and shell, and wept whole platoons at a time, but our men steadily advanced. Our brigade was the first upon the field, and our regiment the last to leave it. Col. Marston was shot in the right shoulder before we had been fighting twenty minutes. I was within ten feet of him when he fell, and thought him shot dead. – I could not render him any assistance, as I had so much to look after. None of the Concord boys are killed. Charles Cooper was shot through the leg. Sergeant Holmes, of Griffin’s Riflemen, was severely wounded in the shoulder. We have not got the returns made yet, so as to know our exact loss.

We lost our battery and Griffin’s battery was close to us. He continued to fire until he had but one horse left out of 100, and not men enough to move the gun ten feet. Wm. Collier, formerly of Concord, got upon the last horse and rode him off. Bill fired the cannon, and in less than a second a cannon ball struck the hub of the wheel and knocked it into the air. Bill sprang to the limber, unhitched the only living horse, and left. You will see in the papers the reports of the killed and wounded nearer than I can write you now. It was the first time we ever stood under fire, and we had a pretty good chance to try our nerves, as we were exposed for 6 hours. The men stood up to the rack splendidly, and were ready to go into anything. It was a most painful sight to go in the rear of the line and see the dead and wounded, and one which we shall soon not forget. Men were mutilated in every conceivable way. We started from our camp at 2 A. M. on Sunday, marched nine miles, fought six hours and marched back to Washington, a distance of 34 miles, without scarcely anything to eat and miserable water to drink – Statesman.

Manchester Weekly Union, 7/30/1861

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Josiah Stevens, Jr., at Find A Grave.com 

Josiah Stevens, Jr., at Ancestry.com 

A History of the Second Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry 

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Pvt. Edward F. Phelps, Co. G, 5th Massachusetts Infantry, On the Campaign

17 11 2016

Correspondence.

Washington, July 25th, 1861.

Head Quarters 5th Reg’t Infantry, M. V. M.

Mr. Sentinel: – I take up my pen, unwillingly, to give you an imperfect account of one of the most disastrous battles ever fought in this country; one which would seem, to every intelligent person, to be unequal, ill-timed, and to persons of ordinary understanding, foolish and fool-hardy. The only possible object apparent in this movement was the gratification of selfish politicians; and I hope they may profit by this lesson, which they have learned at the expense of the poor soldiers.

On Monday evening, July 15th, an order came to our camp to cook up three days rations, and take our haversacks, blankets, canteens, and round-about, with forty rounds of cartridges, and be ready to march at (?) o’clock on Tuesday, the 16th. On Tuesday morning Col. Franklin, commander of the brigade, sent to Col. Lawrence to know how soon he could be ready to move. The answer was, “At any time.” We were then informed that if we were ready to march at 10 o’clock we should have the honor of being the advance guard of the whole division. At just 10 o’clock we were on a line, ready to march, in consequence of which we were the advance guard 48 hours; 24 hours more than is usual.

Our first day’s march was not more than ten miles, and nothing occurred through the day to indicate that we were in the vicinity of the enemy. At sundown we were drawn up on a sloping hill, to camp, for the night, and after the main body of troops had arrived the guard (5th Mass.) was advanced about one mile to an opening in the woods, when we threw out our pickets, and called in our skirmishers. Then stationed a main guard around the camp, and had just laid down for the night, when firing was heard among the pickets. All hands were at once upon their feet, with musket in hand, expecting an attack; but it proved to be only two horsemen whom the pickets fired upon, thinking, probably, in the darkness and excitement, that there were more of them. They killed the horse of one poor fellow, and took him prisoner, after a desperate fight. I do not know what was done with him, but I think they let him go the next morning. The other horseman got away, but it was thought he was wounded.

We had more excitement that night, and slept soundly until daylight next morning, when we had a hasty breakfast of hard bread and salt horse, and got into marching order again. We marched several miles, taking byroads and lanes, sometimes going through pastures, and bridle-paths in the woods, as our division was not to make the attack, but to cut off the retreat of the rebels from Fairfax Court House. There was but very little excitement, except the taking of a prisoner occasionally, until about noon, when in going around through a piece of woods to avoid a battery, our skirmishers ran into a camp of about six hundred rebels, when their pickets fired upon them, and the whole camp beat a hasty retreat. They left their beef on the griddle and their camp kettles boiling, evidently thinking we might be hungry after our forenoon’s march. We got no prisoners here, but found in a house near by twelve knapsacks, the contents of which the boys appropriated to their own use. We had a very good dinner that day. It consisted of ducks, chickens, turkeys, mutton, corn-cake, and all the luxuries usually found in country farm houses in Virginia. The people were glad to see us, and I really believe three-quarters of the inhabitants of this state, honestly told, would go for the Union.

In our march from this place to Longster’s station, we took about 20 prisoners, but failed in cutting off the retreat of the troops from Fairfax. Although we had two hours to spare of the time given us to get to this place, we were one hour behind the retreating column of rebel troops.

We rested at this place until about 4 o’clock the next afternoon, when we got into line again and marched from there to Centreville, about seven miles this side of Manassas. Here we found the other two divisions, which had arrived in advance of us, and were obliged to stop, as the head of their column had unfortunately ran into one of those infernal machines, otherwise known as a masked battery. The Mass. 1st received nearly all the damage done by this battery, the Boston Fusiliers losing over twenty men. It was thought best to wait a few days more before making an attack on Manassas, in order to let the men rest and give the regiments that were cut up time to get in order again. We had in the meanwhile ample time to reconoitre the enemy’s position and look the country over. Nearly all of the two days we were at Centreville we could directly see, with a glass, that the rebels were being reinforced very fast, and it was apparent to almost every one that their force was very much larger than ours; but notwithstanding all this, we were ready and anxious to fight them at any odds. We did not for a moment think of defeat, and had all the forces been put in the field that we had in the vicinity, I do not think we should have been defeated.

At about 2 o’clock on Sunday morning we were called up, and by 3 were on a line ready to march; but did not march until sunrise, when we took the route for Manassas, which we kept for about a mile and a half, when we were led through the fields, north of the main division, which was to make the attack in front while we were to take the route around through the woods and attack the rear. We arrived near Bull’s Run about noon I should think, and then regiment after regiment were marched off and put in positions where they were needed the most.

I will not attempt to give you a description of the battle. I could not if I would, and I will only follow our own brave Fifth. I do not believe there were braver officers or braver soldiers on the field that day. We divested ourselves of our blankets, haversacks, canteens that had no water in them, and all useless baggage. We were then kept close to the woods to avoid the fire of their batteries, until we came to the foot of a hill which sheltered us from their fire; here we were ordered to lie down and rise, one company at a time, and go to the summit of a hill and fire; then file to the right and left to the rear and load; then march to the rear of the rest, and fire when the time came again.

Col. Lawrence commanded us in person, giving his orders with such distinctness and precision as to avoid the possibility of an accident. One regiment on the left of us, in the flurry and excitement, and absence of order, fired altogether, killing at least three of their own men; but such was the coolness of Col. Lawrence and Adj. Chambers that not a man in our regiment was shot in this way.

At the time we were stationed in this position, cannon balls and shells were flying over our heads thick and fact. One shell burst right over the centre of the regiment, and the pieces fell down among us like huge hail stones. One piece dropped beside myself; I picked it up and have it now. Almost every one has some kind of a trophy. We soon drove the rebels from this point, and then we had to march through the Run at ‘double quick,” in order to get at them at another point. We went upon another hill, and were placed along side of the Fire Zouaves, where we saw the best fighting that was probably done by our division. The rebels lay piled two and three deep in front of the gallant and brave Zouaves, many of whom followed poor Elsworth to his long, last home. Here a charge was made by the rebels on the battery which we were sent to protect, and our forces not being strong enough to withstand the charge, we were scattered in every direction. I did not see Sol. Lawrence after this, but was soon informed that he was wounded. After this, not being able to rally all the men around the colors, Capt. Wardwell, of Co. F, and Capt. Geo. L. Prescott, of Co. G., (Concord Artillery,) rallied all the men they could and went into the battle on their own account. They were cool and calm, and fought bravely. Soon after this our color bearer was shot, but the colors were safe.

Our regiment made several rallies after that, and were just forming when they opened their fresh batteries, right upon us, and we were obliged, with everyone else, to retreat. After the order had come for us to retreat, we got together as many as we could, and Capt. Prescott tried hard to make the regiment return to the conflict again. but the rebel force was so large that it was finally thought not best to go back alone, and at this time another battery opened upon us, and we agreed to meet and form again at Centreville; expecting, of course, that we could make a stand there, but just before we got to Centreville another battery opened upon us, cutting us to pieces, and scattering us in every direction. Many of us did not reach Centreville until the next morning, and some poor fellows did not reach there at all. Those who did reach there that night did not stop, but kept on until they reached Washington or Alexandria. We do not pretend to count the killed yet, for almost every hour some one arrives who was so much exhausted that he could not reach home sooner. Our loss is not near so large as we at first supposed, and we hope yet to see many alive who have been counted dead.

We are stationed, by companies, in different parts of the city, and at present are only taking care of the sick and wounded. There are at present only five missing from the Concord company, and we hope to see some, if not all of them yet. The Waltham boys are all alive and well.

Our army will not be ready to march again for several months; but when they do go it is to be hoped, for the sake of the poor soldiers, that all politicians will be kept from having anything to do with it. Gen. Scott says that he fought the battle against his own judgment; and it was evident to every one, by the swarm of politicians in our camp at Centreville, that the whole thing was gotten up by this class of men, many of whom have less principle than brains.

The time for which our regiment enlisted expires in just one week from to-day, and we shall probably return home as soon as we can be mustered out of service. After that, if anything transpires of account, I will give you the benefit of it.

In the mean time I remain as ever,

Yours Truly,

E. F. P.*

Waltham (MA) Sentinel, 8/2/1861

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*Likely Private Edward F. Phelps, Co. G., the only E. F. P. I could find in the roster.

Edward F. Phelps at Ancestry.com

The Fifth regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in its Three Tours of Duty 1861, 1862-’63, 1864

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





Pvt. John T. Phillips, Co. A, 2nd Ct Infantry, On the Wounding of James F. Wilkinson 

14 11 2016

Camp of the Second Regiment.

Washington, July 25th, 1861.

Editor Transcript: – Long before this letter reaches you, you will have learned that your assistant editor, J. F. Wilkinson, was wounded in the battle at Bull Run, on Sunday last. I was close by him when he fell, yet I can give you only the following particulars concerning his fate:

The battle had continued about four hours, and our regiment had been stationed in a deep ravine, covered with wood, where the balls from the rebels’ battery on the hill above us, were flying over our heads like hail, when we received orders to change our position. We had commenced marching, when he fell, exclaiming, as he did so, “My God, I am shot!” and soon after fainted. He appeared to be wounded just above the ankle.

His comrades asked for permission to leave the ranks, and convey him to a place of safety, if possible. The privilege of doing so was not granted, but corporal Jennings was detailed to assist him to the hospital. Our regiment moved on, and as nothing has been heard from either of them since, we are forced to the belief that if living, they are prisoners in the rebel camp.

Several times during the battle he had expressed the opinion that he could not endure the heat and labor we were subjected to, and should be compelled to leave the ranks. His comrades, knowing what his fate would be if he did so, encouraged him to renewed efforts, and he fell at his post, nobly doing his duty. You are so intimately acquainted with him that it is almost unnecessary to add, that no man was more ready to meet the enemies of his country, or would have braved more dangers to have secured a victory.

Dr. McGregor, of the 3rd Connecticut, is also a prisoner. He was attending to the wounded in the hospital at the time of the charge, and could have secured his safety by flight, but refused to leave the wounded.

I have not time to write more at present, s the mail is about to close.

Yours, &c.

J. T. P. *

P. S. The Second Regiment will probably leave for home in a few days.

Windham County (CT) Transcript, 8/1/1861

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Catalogue of Connecticut Volunteer Organizations (Roster)

Some biographical information on James F. Wilkinson, editor of the Windham County (CT) Transcript and member of Co. A, (wounded and captured at Bull Run) can be found here.

*J. T. P. is likely Pvt. John T. Phillips, of Pomfret, CT, also of Co. A.

Surgeon John McGregor was attached to the 3rd CT Infantry. Life and Deeds of Dr. John McGregor

John T. Phillips at Ancestry.com

Contributed by John Hennessy





Pvt. Augustus E. Bronson, Co. I, 3rd Connecticut Infantry, On the Advance and Blackburn’s Ford

10 11 2016

War News.

——————

From the manuscript of our valuable and attentive correspondent, we should judge it was written while capturing one of the batteries at the battle of Bull’s Run. We hope he survives, and will continue to dot the incidents of the war.

Near Centreville, Va.,

July 18th, 1861.

We left “Camp Tyler” at 3 P. M. on Tuesday, with provisions for three days, and no other baggage but one pair of socks. The First, Second, and Third Connecticut Regiments Connecticut Volunteers, with the Second Regiment Maine Volunteers, constituted the advance. We marched by a circuitous route to Vienna, near which we camped for the night in an open field. Soon after we halted, the other brigades began to come in, and kept coming until the fields in all directions were covered with infantry, horsemen, and artillery. At about 5 o’clock A. M., on Wednesday, we again took up the line of march, in the direction of Fairfax. After marching about a mile we came to a road which had been obstructed by having trees felled across it. Removing the obstructions we continued our march, and when nearly in sight of Fairfax our scouts reported the enemy in sight. We formed and marched in double quick time across the fields, and came into line in time to see the rebels going off at the same pace. A brass band consisting of six pieces, belonging to the New York 8th, gave them a note or two of Yankee music, which increased their speed to a full run, and then struck into the woods and scoured them as far as Germantown, where we learned that the rebels had been in full retreat past there all day. They had a masked battery near Germantown, but had deserted it. Their baggage was scattered all along the road. I believe that some buildings in the place, and to belong to “seceshers,” accidentally caught fire soon after the Ellsworth Zouaves had passed. (I am sorry, but accidents will happen.) We again bivouaced in the fields on Wednesday night, about 3 miles from Germantown, towards Manassas. This A. M., at about 3 o’clock, we were aroused by the sound of the bugle, and were speedily in line, expecting an attack, but it did not come. At about 6:30 A. M., the army was again in motion, and as our brigade had formed the advance for two days, we were allowed to take the rear to-day. It was a grand sight, as regiment after regiment moved, until I should judge that at least 40,000 troops must have been in motion. It was an hour and a half after the march commenced, before it became our turn to move. We continued to see blankets, coats, etc., which in their haste the seceshers had thrown away.

We are now halted in the woods near Centreville, which I believe is eight miles from Manassas. There was a very strong battery near here, but the rebels ran about an hour before our advance came up. We have taken a few prisoners, but have had no fighting as yet. Our cavalry have just brought in a few prisoners, and report the enemy coming back. It is supposed Gen. Patterson is on the other side, driving them back, so we may have a fight to-day, yet.

3 o’clock P. M. There is a report now that our boys are getting the worst of it, and reinforcements are arriving amid the roar of cannon and the rattle of muskets.

4 o’clock P. M. Our men have carried their entrenchments, and the seceshers have fallen back into the woods. It is said that the 69th went at double quick time and stormed the battery without stopping. Bully for the 69th. One report is 4000 prisoners taken, but I don’t believe it. Another report is that Sherman’s battery was taken; but nobody believes that. Another report is that there was a masked battery in front of an open battery. Sherman’s battery silenced the open battery, and the N. Y. 12th then charged, when the masked battery opened upon them, and our men retreated.

5 o’clock P. M. A report has just reached us that our troops have the enemy surrounded in the woods. The last report is that both armies occupy the same positions they did at the commencement of the engagement. The action will be resumed in the morning, if the rebels do not retreat during the night. – About 50 of our men are killed, Sherman’s battery played into a train of cars filled by rebel troops, but how many were killed I do not know.

I have written down the reports, a few of them, as they came in, that you might see how much we can depend on reports in the midst of battle. The long and short of it is that our men were defeated.

6 o’clock, A. M., Friday. – Troops have been pouring in here all night. Gen. Tyler had command of our troops yesterday. The Fire Zouaves have taken eleven prisoners. One of the number was one who had taken the oath of allegiance at Fall’s Church. – When our roll call was handed in at the close of the first day’s march, not one of the 3rd was missing.

7:30 A. M. They are now hanging the man who was taken prisoner after having taken the oath.

A. E. Bronson

The Danbury Times, 7/25/1861

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Letters of Augustus E. Bronson as a member of the 17th CT 

Augustus E. Bronson at Fold 3 

Augusts E. Bronson at Findagrave.com 

Augustus E. Bronson at Ancestry.com 

Bronson was captured on July 21, 1861. After he was exchanged 9 months later, he enlisted in Co. C. of the 17th CT. He was mortally wounded at Gettysburg and died on July 5, 1863.

Contributed by John J. Hennessy





“M”, 2nd South Carolina Infantry, On the Retreat from Fairfax Court House, Blackburn’s Ford and the Battle

7 11 2016

Virginia Correspondence.

The Retreat from Fairfax C. H. – The Battle of the 18th – The Great Battle – The Killed and Wounded – The Captured Arms and Munitions – Our Wounded.

Virginia University, July 24.

Mr. Editor: On Wednesday last the Federal forces made their appearance in sight of Fairfax Village, upon which information Gen. Bonham made hasty preparations to five tem a warm reception, though as soon as the rifle companies of the 2d Regiment had reached the position they were to occupy as skirmishers, it was ascertained that the enemy were attempting to flank and cut off the Regiments at the Village, the order to retreat was given which was reluctantly obeyed by 4 Regiments of Carolinians. It seems that the enemy were marching to Fairfax in four or five columns of ten or fifteen thousand troops in each, and the arduous task of covering a retreat devolved upon the 2d Regiment. The retreat was conducted in an orderly, military and masterly manner, with only one or two missing and one to die en route. Though many weary limbs had given way to the hot and fatiguing double quick march, and on reaching Centreville our company mustered only forty-five men; among the absent was your correspondent who completely exhausted had been taken up behind our gallant and kind Commissary, Vellipigue. At Centreville our forces halted until midnight, when they again took up the line of march for Bull Run, on reaching which place our boys quickly repaired to the entrenchments which had cost them such hard labor a few weeks previous.

About 7 o’clock Thursday morning it was ascertained that the enemy were approaching, our company and the Palmetto Guards were sent out about one mile with Capt. Kemper’s battery to five our foe the breakfast welcome at Bull Run, and here our boys were first taught to quickly embrace the earth on the sound of a shell or cannon ball. Their balls passed harmlessly by while a dozen well directed volleys from Capt. Kemper’s battery mowed down their columns like so many pond weeds and caused them to change their plan of attack. The cannonading was soon stopped at this point and about 11 o’clock an exchange of musket shots began about a mile below our position accompanied by heavy cannonading, which was vigorously and actively continued for four consecutive hours, after which the enemy were put to flight with much loss of life and with three pieces of artillery left upon the field. Our loss was small, about six killed and forty odd wounded, while that of the enemy is variously estimated at from five hundred to three thousand in killed and wounded. The troops engaged in this battle were about three thousand on our part, the Washington Artillery, and Gen. Longstreets Brigade, the enemy are supposed to have had about ten thousand in the engagement. This ended the first battle at Bull Run with victory perched upon the Southern standard.

After dusk on the same evening it being believed that the enemy would not make an attack at the direct ford our Regiment was ordered to a weak point on the creek towards the left wing, where we remained upon arms during the following day. On Friday night an attack was momentarily expected and our men still retained their position in rank, while our company was ordered to the defence of Kemper’s battery, but the night passed in quietude save the interchange of a few picket guard shot; Saturday and night glided by in the same state of peace and quietude, but the harmony was broken s Sunday morning by a heavy fire of artillery on the center of our forces and on the extreme left wing. Our company was again sent out a mile and a half to ascertain in what direction the enemy were moving, but our mission was too late, the great body of their troops had been removed to the extreme left the night previous and the cannonading in the centre was only to deceive us as to the point of attack. While on the scout we were greeted with a goodly quantity of shell, balls and grape, thought they passed harmlessly over our heads. On returning to our camp we found that the regiment had been hastily despatched to the scene of battle and in haste we followed after them, though we were unable to find our Regiment, not knowing their position on the battle ground, so we attached ourselves to a Louisiana Regiment and went into the scene of action a the enemy only rallied twice after our arrival. – While going to our position in battle three hundred yards we were warmly peppered with Minnie musket balls, wounding Mr. Harrison of our company and killing several of the Regiment to which we were attached. on approaching near the enemy and preparing to charge bayonets a few volleys from one of batteries dispersed them to rally no more. After the flight of the enemy we were dispatched by our Captain to look after Mr. Harrison whom we found severely wounded in forearm and knee. Our troops pursued the enemy for miles, slaughtering and capturing them, and we understand that the Secession Guards took a respectable number of prisoners. The battle was terrific and strongly contested during the whole day, though the entire and complete route of the enemy somewhat alleviates the cost of so many gallant sons. The enemy attacked the wing of Gen. Johnson who had just completed his brilliant movement from Winchester to Manassas and for seven hours his wearied soldiers gallantly struggled with the heavy columns of the enemy when Gen. Beauregard came to his relief and after a few hours of hard struggling gained a signal and brilliant victory.

The heavy odds against whom Johnson had been contending were soon scattered and chased by the gallant hero of Sumter, who would dash before the thickest and hottest of the fire – leading our men to a bayonet charge and then directing the enemy’s cannon upon their own columns. The victory though decisive was a costly one; Carolina has to mourn the loss of the brave Johnson of Hampton’s Legion, and of Bernard Bee. Other distinguished officers fell in the field. The whole Confederate loss may be estimated at 450 dead, 250 mortally wounded and 1200 wounded more or less severely. This is the best estimate I can make by rough guess – it may be too large. In my own Regiment only 6 were killed and 15 or 20 wounded; though we were not in the hottest of the fight. Among those who suffered most severely was the 4th Alabama Regiment, the 7th and 8th Georgia Regiments, Hampton’s Legion and Col. Sloan’s Regiment of our own State, they having to oppose heavy columns of the enemy four hours until reinforcements could be brought to their relief. Among the wounded in our Regiment may be mentioned the gallant Capt. Hoke of Greenville.

[?????] their final retreat the panic became so great that the whole army was completely disorganized. Gen. McDowell undertook to make a stand near Centreville though it was impossible to make a rally of them either at that place or Fairfax. The whole road from Bull Run to Fairfax was covered with dead, wounded and exhausted soldiers, it was also strewn with knapsacks and small arms, which were discarded by the Federals in order to facilitate their retreat. I have only heard of about 1200 prisoners among whom are several field officers, though none of them of higher rank than Colonel.

It is said that we captured over two million dollars worth of property. Over one hundred baggage wagons loaded with army stores fell into our position. Sherman’s, Carlisle’s, Griffin’s and the West Point Batteries numbering from 50 to 100 pieces, all fell into our possession. Also the 32 pounders rifled cannon and several thousand stand of small arms, also the Rhode Island battery. It was a mistake about the Yankees not fighting; they fought manfully and gallantly, and some of their regiments were literally destroyed. The Fire Zouaves, the 69th, 71st, 14th and 28th New York Regiments, and the Michigan Regiments suffered frightfully. The outfit of the enemy was splendid and extravagant. The knapsacks and haversacks of the soldiers were filled with eatables and comforts. The wagons and ambulances were stored with luxuries for the officers that would astonish any frugal, warfaring people, fighting for liberty. Notwithstanding the complete route of the enemy they are still in strong force and much hard fighting is yet before us.

Our wounded suffered greatly for the first day or two after the battle as there are no accommodations at Manassas, in fact only two or three houses were there which could not contain them. Though they have all been sent to this place, Culpepper, Orange, Richmond, &c., where they will receive every attention at the hands of surgeons, nurses and ladies – of the kindness to the wounded by the ladies I cannot speak too much in praise – they supply them with every luxury, comfort, and conceivable necessity. So all persons who have wounded friends at the hospital at this place need not feel the least anxiety as to their treatment, as they are better provided for than they possibly could be in the most comfortable home. Having deposited Mr. Harrison in the most desirable quarters, I hasten back to rejoin my company this morning, though I shall not soon forget to contrast one night’s comfort at this place to the privations of camp.

This letter is written in great haste and hurry though I think the accounts of the battle are generally acurate. However your readers will receive the official reports before this reaches you.

M

The Abbeville Press, 8/2/1861

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Contributed by John J. Hennessy