Unit History – 5th Massachusetts Infantry

30 06 2022

Cols., Samuel C. Lawrence, George H. Pierson; Lieut.-Cols., J. Durell Greene, John T. Boyd, William E. C. Worcester; Majs., Hamlin W. Keyes, William E. C. Worcester, William T. Grammer. The 5th regiment, Mass. militia, volunteered for three months, and with the addition of one company from the 1st and four from the 7th militia, it reported for duty at Washington, where it was mustered into the U. S. service, May 1, 1861. It fought nobly in the battle of Bull Run and on July 21, 1861, was mustered out at Boston. The regiment volunteered again for the nine months’ service and was reorganized at Wenham, in Sept. and Oct., 1862, with 984 officers and men. It left Boston Oct. 22 for New Berne, N. C., and from there moved to Washington, N. C., and Williamston. It took part in an expedition to Goldsboro and met the enemy in battles at Kinston, Whitehall and Goldsboro. On April 4, 1863, it went to the relief of Little Washington, but was obliged to return to New Berne. It was mustered out at Wenham, July 2, 1863. In July, 1864, the 5th again took the field in response to the call for troops for 100 days. It proceeded to Baltimore, garrisoned Fort Marshall, was detailed for duty at different places in Maryland during the elections, and was mustered out at Readville, Nov. 16, 1864.

From The Union Army, Vol. 1, pp. 169-170





Unit History – 71st New York State Militia

29 06 2022

Col., Abram S. Vosburgh; Lieut.- Col., Henry P. Martin; Maj., George A. Buckingham. This regiment, also known as the American Guard and Vosburgh Chasseurs, was a New York city organization and was one of the eleven uniformed militia regiments sent to the relief of Washington upon the outbreak of the war. It left the state on April 21, 1861, 950 strong, reached the capital on the 27th; and was mustered into the U. S. service on May 3, for a term of three months. It was first quartered in the inauguration ball room, whence it was ordered to barracks in the navy yard. Co. I, armed with 2 howitzers, was originally Co. L, 19th militia, “Parmenter’s Riflemen” from Newburg, and joined the 71st soon after its arrival in Washington. On May 20, Col. Vosburgh succumbed to disease and the command devolved upon Lieut.-Col. Martin, who was commissioned colonel on June 15, Charles H. Smith becoming lieutenant-colonel at the same time. The regiment participated in the occupation of Alexandria, Va., May 24, and first came under fire in the attack on the batteries at Acquia creek. It took part in the attack on Matthias point and rendered excellent service at the first battle of Bull Run, where it served in the 2nd brigade (Burnside’s), 2nd division (Hunter’s), Army of Northeastern Virginia, being among the last to leave the field and retiring in good order. It lost 10 enlisted men killed, 3 officers and 37 men wounded, 1 officer and 11 men captured, a total loss of 62. Speaking of the service of the 71st, Col. Burnside reported: “I beg again to mention the bravery and steadiness manifested by Col. Martin and his entire regiment, both in the field and during the retreat.” The regiment was mustered out on July 30, 1861, at New York city. On May 28, 1862, the regiment was again mustered into the U. S. service for three months and left the state the same day, 820 strong. It was commanded by Col. Martin, with Charles H. Smith as lieutenant-colonel. Assigned to Sturgis’ brigade it served in the defenses of Washington, and was mustered out in New York city on Sept. 2. A considerable number of the regiment at once reënlisted in the 124th infantry then being recruited. On June 17, 1863, the regiment entered the U. S. service for the third time, leaving the state for Harrisburg, Pa., for 30 days’ service. Its field officers were Col., Benjamin L. Trafford; Lieut.- Col., William J. Coles; Maj., David C. Muschutt. It was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, Department of the Susquehanna, and saw a good deal of hard service during the short campaign, being almost constantly on the march. It participated in skirmishes at Kingston and near Harrisburg, and on its return to the state was on active duty during the draft riots in New York city in July. It was mustered out of service, July 22, 1863. The losses of the regiment during service in 1861 were 11 enlisted men killed in action; 1 enlisted man and 1 officer died of wounds; 1 officer and 4 enlisted men died of disease, a total of 18.

From The Union Army, Vol. 2, pp. 245-246





Unit History – Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery

28 06 2022

First Regiment, Light Artillery – Col., Charles H. Tompkins; Lieut. Cols., William H. Reynolds, John A. Monroe; Majs., John A. Monroe, John A. Tompkins, John G. Hazard. The organization of this regiment was begun early in 1861, but was not completed until the fall of 1862.

Battery A. – Capts., William H. Reynolds, John A. Tompkins, William A. Arnold, was organized in connection with the 2nd R. I. infantry. It was mustered into the U. S. service for three years on June 6, 1861, at Providence, and left for Washington on the 19th. It went into camp at Camp Sprague, and was attached to Burnside’s brigade, Hunter’s division, McDowell’s corps. In the first battle of Bull Run it lost several men in killed and wounded, and had a number of its guns and horses captured by the enemy. The battery returned to Camp Sprague and on July 28, was ordered to Sandy Hook, Md., where it received the guns and equipment from the 1st light battery, then about to be mustered out. Upon the organization of a battalion of light artillery in August and of an entire regiment in September this command became battery A of the 1st R. I. light artillery, its captain being appointed lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. Winter quarters were established at Poolesville, Md., but camp was broken in March, 1862, for the Peninsular campaign, in which the battery took an active part. It was held in reserve at Chantilly; was active at Antietam, where 4 men were killed and 15 wounded; participated in the battle of Fredericksburg; wintered at Falmouth; was active at Marye’s heights and at Gettysburg, losing in the last battle 5 killed and 23 wounded, besides 30 horses; then moved southward with the Army of the Potomac; fought at Bristoe Station and in the Mine Run campaign, and went into winter quarters at Mountain run. On Feb. 6, 1864, it was engaged at Morton’s ford and on May 3, broke camp for the Wilderness campaign, during which it was active at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, the North Anna river, Cold Harbor, etc., and became noted as a reliable command. On June 18, 1864, its term of service having expired, the battery was mustered out, but Lieut. Dwight immediately reorganized it and it continued in the field with the Army of the Potomac. On Sept. 30, 1864, it was consolidated with Battery B. During the entire term of service of the battery its casualty list numbered 1 officer and 17 men killed in action, 90 wounded and 4 captured. Four years’ hard fighting was the portion of its members and its history is that of arduous duties faithfully and efficiently performed.

From The Union Army, Vol. 1, p. 251





Unit History – 2nd Rhode Island Infantry

23 06 2022

Cols., John S. Slocum, Frank Wheaton, Nelson Viall, Horatio Rogers, Jr., Samuel B. M. Read, Elisha H. Rhodes; Lieut. Cols., Frank Wheaton, William H. P. Steere, Nelson Viall, Nathan Goff, Jr., Samuel B. M. Read, Henry C. Jenckes, Elisha H. Rhodes; Majs., Sullivan Ballou, Nelson Viall, Nathan Goff, Jr. Thorndike C. Jameson, Henry C. Jenckes, Stephen H. Brown, Henry H. Young. The 2nd infantry was organized at Providence and was composed of one company from Bristol, one from East Greenwich, one from South Kingston, three from Providence and a battery of light artillery from Providence. It was mustered into the U. S. service at Providence June 5 and 6, 1861, for three years. The command, over 800 strong, went into camp at the Dexter training grounds until June 19, when it embarked for the front. Landing at Elizabeth, N. J., the troops proceeded by rail to Baltimore and on the 22nd arrived at Camp Sprague, Washington, where they were warmly greeted by their comrades of the 1st. The 2nd was assigned to the 2nd brigade (Col. Burnside), 2nd division (Col. Hunter), and moved toward Manassas on July 16. In the battle which followed on the 21st the 2nd fired the opening volley and early showed its fighting qualities. Its loss in this engagement was 98 killed, wounded and missing, among the mortally wounded being Col. Slocum and Maj. Ballou. On the return to Washington Camp Sprague was occupied until Aug. 6, when the regiment moved to Brightwood and in the general reorganization of the army was brigaded with the 7th and 10th Mass. and 36th N. Y., under Gen. Couch in Buell’s division, whose command was later taken by Gen. Keyes. Camp Brightwood was left on March 26, 1862, at which time the brigade, commanded by Col. Charles Devens, Jr., moved into Virginia for the Peninsular campaign. The regiment shared in the wearisome marches on the Peninsula, a number of sharp skirmishes, and was closely engaged at Malvern hill, after which it encamped at Harrison’s Landing until the middle of August, when it moved to Yorktown. The troops suffered much from sickness during this campaign. On Aug. 31 the 2nd moved to Alexandria and the next day to Chantilly, where it was assigned to Robinson’s brigade, Birney’s division, 3d corps. During the Maryland campaign it was ordered from place to place in support of the army and finally was attached to the 6th corps, which became its permanent assignment. At Fredericksburg the regiment was in action and occupied winter quarters at Falmouth until late in April, 1863, when it participated in the Chancellorsville campaign. At Marye’s heights, in the victorious dash of May 3, the regiment distinguished itself under Col. Rogers and lost 7 killed, 68 wounded and 5 missing, receiving complimentary notice for gallantry in action. On June 6, it left camp at Falmouth and was present at Gettysburg, but was held in reserve. In the pursuit which followed and the movements of the Army of the Potomac during the autumn, the regiment participated and went into winter quarters at Brandy Station, Dec. 3, 1863, where it remained until May 4, 1864, when it broke camp for the Wilderness campaign, in which the entire regiment was active until June 11, when the original members not reënlisted were mustered out, the recruits and veterans making up the reorganized regiment, which, under command of Col. Rhodes, remained with the 6th corps. In the fall and winter five new companies were added to the regiment, which shared in the operations before Petersburg; was active at Winchester, Sept. 19, remaining there until Dec. 1; was engaged at Hatcher’s run, in Dec., 1864, and Feb., 1865; was in action at Forts Fisher and Stedman, and in the final assault on April 2. The regiment joined in the pursuit of Lee’s army and was engaged at Sailor’s creek, where it lost 49 men in killed and wounded. Guard duty followed at Burkesville, Danville and Wells’ station until May 16, when faces were turned homeward. After participation in the grand review at Washington, the 2nd was stationed at Hall’s hill, Va., and there mustered out on July 13, 1865, having earned by long and effective service the warm welcome awaiting it at Providence. The total loss of the regiment was 9 officers and 111 men killed or died of wounds, and 76 deaths from accident or disease, in all 196. The regiment is mentioned by Col. Fox as one of the “three hundred fighting regiments.”

From The Union Army, Vol. 1, pp. 244-246





Unit History – 1st Rhode Island Infantry

23 06 2022

Col., Ambrose E. Burnside; Lieut.-Col., Joseph S. Pitman; Majs., John S. Slocum, Joseph P. Balch, William Goddard. This regiment was organized at Providence early in April, 1861, from the state militia, whose services were accepted by Gen. Scott in Jan., 1861, having been previously rejected by Pres. Buchanan. In April Gov. Sprague was authorized to send to the front one regiment of infantry and a battery of light artillery. From the large number of volunteers 1,200 men were chosen, and the organization was completed as follows: Co. A, Providence National Cadets; B, Providence “Artillery“; C and D, Providence 1st Light Infantry; E, Pawtucket Light Guard; F, Newport Artillery; G and H, Providence Mechanics Rifles; I, Westerly Rifles and K, Woonsocket Guards. With Col. Burnside, already a man of broad military knowledge and experience, in command, the regiment left Providence in two detachments, embarking on transports for New York, amid scenes of the wildest enthusiasm. From New York it was ordered to Annapolis, Md., where it was quartered at the Naval academy for a few days and then marched to Washington , arriving there during the last week of April. It was quartered at the Patent Office until May 2, when it was mustered into the U. S. service for three months and ordered into camp near the Bladensburg road. The sanitary condition of the camp was excellent and the men were little affected by sickness. After a month of drill the 1st was assigned to the forces gathering under Gen. Patterson to attack Harper’s Ferry and joined his command at Chambersburg, leaving camp Sprague on June 8. Camp Duncan at Greencastle was occupied on the 12th, and here it was learned that the enemy had withdrawn from Harper’s Ferry. At Falling Waters orders were received for the return of the regiment to Washington and Camp Sprague was re occupied on June 19. On July 8, the regiment was brigaded with the 2nd R. I., Reynolds’ Battery, 2nd N. H. and 71st N. Y., under command of Col. Burnside and became a part of Hunter’s division. The Bull Run movement commenced on July 16 and on the 21st the regiment was closely engaged. The 2nd R. I. was first thrown into action and other regiments of the brigade soon hurried to its support. The approach of a Confederate force under the Union flag gave the enemy opportunity to fire at close range with resulting heavy loss of life, when the brigade was relieved by Sherman’s division. When the retreat was ordered, the 1st returned to Washington and a few days later to Providence, where it was mustered out on Aug. 2, 1861. During the three months that the command was at the front, 12 members were killed, 33 wounded, 22 captured, of whom 12 were wounded and 1 man was reported missing.

From The Union Army, Vol. 1, p. 244





Unit History – 2nd New Hampshire Infantry

22 06 2022

Cols., Thomas P. Pierce, Gilman Marston, Edward L. Bailey, Joab N. Patterson; Lieut.-Cols., Frank S. Fiske, Edward L. Bailey, James W. Carr, Joab N. Patterson, John D. Çooper, Jr., Levi N. Converse (not mustered); Majs., Josiah Stevens, Edward L. Bailey, James W. Carr, Samuel P. Sayles, John D. Cooper, Jr., Levi N. Converse, George T. Carter (not mustered). The 2nd regiment, composed of volunteers from all parts of the state, was mustered into the service of the United States at Portsmouth, from May 31 to June 10, 1861, except its band, which was mustered in Aug. 7, 1861, at Washington and mustered out Aug. 8, 1862, near Harrison’s landing, Va . The recruits transferred from the 17th N. H. infantry, April 16, 1863, were mustered out at Concord, June 21, 1864, the reënlisted men and recruits on Dec. 19, 1865, at City Point, Va. The regiment’s original members numbered 1,022, transferred 1, recruits 1,144, band recruits 22, recruits gained by transfer 366; making a total of 2,555. The losses include 159 killed or died of wounds, 178 deaths from other causes, making a total loss of 337. A large proportion of the members of the 2nd enlisted for three months in April, 1861, but reënlisted for three years when the second call for troops was sent out. The regiment left Portsmouth for Washington June 20, via Boston and New York, receiving ovations all along the route. On arriving in Washington it became a part of the 2nd brigade of Hunter’s division and opened the fight at Bull Run, July 21, 1861. The winter was spent at Budd’s ferry, Md., and in the spring the regiment took part in the siege of Yorktown, after which it pursued and attacked the Confederate rear-guard at Williamsburg. On May 31 , 1862, it was at Poplar hill and participated in the fight at Fair Oaks. Two days later they fought at Oak Grove. For bravery in action at Williamsburg and Oak Grove, Private Michael Dillon, Co. G, was awarded a medal by Congress. Skirmishes followed at Peach Orchard, Va., Glendale, Malvern hill and Kettle run and, on Aug. 29, the regiment was again at Bull Run. At Chantilly it was not brought into action and at Fredericksburg its duties were comparatively light. The 2nd wintered in New Hampshire. At Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, the 2nd made a historic defense at Sherfy’s peach orchard. It joined Grant at Cold Harbor in June, 1864, having made a noble record at Front Royal, Warrenton , Point Lookout, Petersburg and Fort Darling, and finished its active service with the Army of the Potomac.

From The Union Army, Vol. 1, pp. 81-82





Unit History, Battery D, 5th U. S. Artillery (West Point Battery)

21 06 2022

Attached to Stone’s Expedition, June, 1861. 1st Brig. 2d Div. Army of N. E. Virginia, to August, 1861. W. F. Smith’s Brigade Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Attached to Porter’s Division, Army Potomac, October, 1861, to March, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army Potomac, to May, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps, Army Potomac, to May, 1863. Artillery Brigade, 5th Army Corps, to December, 1863. Camp Barry, Washington, D. C., 22nd Army Corps, to March, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 5th Army Corps, to November, 1864. Consolidated with Battery “G” November, 1864. Artillery Reserve, Army Potomac, to June, 1865. Dept. of Washington, D. C., 22nd Army Corps, to –

SERVICE.— Rockville Expedition June 10-July 7, 1861. Advance to Manassas, Va., July 16-21, Battle of Bull Run, July 21. Duty in the Defences of Washington till March, 1862. Lewinsville, Va., September 11, 1861. Reconnoissance to Lewinsville September 25. Edward’s Ferry October 22. Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula March, 1862. Howard’s Mills April 4. Warwick Road April 5. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Hanover Court House May 27. Operations about Hanover Court House May 27-29. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Mechanicsburg June 26. Gaines Mill June 27. Turkey Bridge June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison’s Landing till August 16. Moved to Fortress Monroe, thence to Alexandria August 16-23. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Shepherdstown Ford September 19. Reconnoissance to Smithfield, W. Va., October 16-17. Kearneysville and Shepherdstown October 16-17. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Expedition from Potomac Creek to Richards and Ellis Fords, Rappahannock River, December 29-30. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. At Camp Barry, Washington, D. C., till March, 1864. Rapidan Campaign May 4-June 12. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania Court House May 8-21; North Anna River May 22-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Weldon Railroad August 18-21, 1864. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9, 1865. Junction of Quaker and Boydton Roads and Lewis’ Farm March 29. White Oak Road March 31. Battle of Five Forks April 1. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D. C., May. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington, D. C., till –

From Frederick Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, p. 1707





Unit History – 2nd U. S. Cavalry

21 06 2022

All Companies in Washington, D. C., by December, 1861, except “C” “G” and “I.” Company “C” left Fort Leavenworth. Kan., June 11, 1861. At Springfield, Mo., August 6. Battle of Wilson’s Creek, Mo., August 10. Moved to St. Louis. Mo., August 11-30, thence to Paducah, Ky. Attached to District of Paducah, Ky., to February, 1862. 2nd Division, District of West Tennessee, and Army Tennessee, to July, 1862. 2nd Division, District of Corinth, Miss., to November, 1862. District of Corinth, Miss., 13th Army Corps, Dept. Tennessee, to December, 1862. 2nd Division, District of Corinth, 17th Army Corps, to January, 1863. 2nd Division, District Corinth, 16th Army Corps, January, 1863. District of Memphis, Tenn., escort to Gen. Grant, Commanding Army Tennessee, to May, 1863.

SERVICE (Co. “C”).— Operations against Fort Henry, Tenn., February 2-6, 1862. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Expedition to Nashville, Tenn.. February 19-25. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 1-16. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Duty at and about Corinth, Miss., till January, 1863. Battle of Corinth October 3-4, 1862. Grant’s Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. Reached Memphis, Tenn., January 15, 1863, and duty there as escort to Glen. Grant’s Headquarters till May. Joined Regiment at Falmouth, Va., May, 1863.

Company “G.” — Temporarily assigned to duty with McRae’s Battery Artillery in New Mexico. Duty in New Mexico October, 1861, to September, 1862. Battle of Valverde February 21, 1862. Evacuation of Albuquerque and Santa Fe March 2-4. March to Fort Leavenworth, Kan., September and October, 1862, arriving there October 27. Arrive at Washington, D. C., November 23, and joined Regiment at Falmouth, Va., January 13, 1863.

Company “I.”— At Taos, “N. M., April to October, 1861. Moved to Fort Garland October 1-9, and duty there till September, 1862. Moved to Fort Leavenworth, Kan., arriving there October 27. Arrive at Washington, D. C., November 23, and join Regiment at Falmouth, Va., January 13, 1863.

Regiment attached to Thomas’ Command, Patterson’s Army, June, 1861. 1st Brigade, Banks’ Division, Shenandoah, to August. 1861. Cavalry Reserve, Army Potomac, to March, 1862. Provost Guard, Army Potomac, to February, 1863. Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army Potomac, to August, 1804. 3rd (Reserve) Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, March, 1865. Cavalry Brigade, Army Shenandoah, to July, 1865.

SERVICE.— Occupation of Arlington Heights, Va., May 24. 1861 (Detachment). Fairfax Court House June 1 (Co. “B”). Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21 (4 Cos.). Blackburn’s Ford July 18. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Duty in the Defences of Washington, D. C, till March, 1862. Peninsula Campaign April to August. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4. Ellison’s Mill near Mechanicsville May 23 (Detachment). New Bridge May 24 (Detachment). Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Reconnoissance to Charlestown, W Va. October 16-17. Charlestown October 16. Expedition from Potomac Creek to Richards and Ellis Fords, Rappahannock River, December 29-30. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 8. Stoneman’s Raid April 29-May 8. Brandy Station and Beverly Ford June 9. Expedition from Point Lookout, Md., to Pope’s Creek June 11-21 (Detachment). Middleburg June 19. Upperville June 21. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Williamsport, Md., July 6. Boonesboro July town July 10-13. Falling Waters July 14. Manassas Gap July 21-22. Wapping Heights July 23. Kelly’s Ford July 31-August 1. Brandy Station August 1-4. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Manassas Junction October 17. Bristoe Station October 18. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Barnett’s Ford February 6-7. Custer’s Raid in Albemarle County February 28-March 1. Near Charlottesville February 29. Stannardsville March 1. Rapidan Campaign May 4-June 12. Wilderness May 5-7. Todd’s Tavern May 7-8. Sheridan’s Raid to the James River May 9-24. Ground Squirrel Church and Yellow Tavern May 11. Mechanicsville May 12. Line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Hanovertown Ferry and Hanovertown May 27. Haw’s Shop May 28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Old Church and Mattadequin Creek May 30. Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, May 31-June 1. Sheridan’s Trevillian Raid June 7-24. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Mallory’s Cross Roads June 12. Black Creek or Tunstall Station and White House or St. Peter’s Church June 21. Jones’ Bridge June 23. Siege of Petersburg till August. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Malvern Hill July 28. Sheridan’s Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7- November 28. Toll Gate near White Post and near Newtown August 11. Near Strasburg August 14. Halltown and near Kearneysville August 25. Leetown and Smithville August 28. Smithfleld Crossing, Opequan, August 28. Locke’s Ford, Opequan Creek, September 13. Sevier’s Ford, Opequan Creek, September 15. Battle of Opequan, Winchester. September 19. Fisher’s Hill September 21. Milford September 22. Front Royal September 23. Luray Valley September 24. Front Royal September 25. Port Republic September 26-27. Rockfish Gap September 28. Mt. Crawford October 2. Tom’s Brook, Woodstock Races, October 8-9. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Near Kernstown November 11. Expedition into Loudoun and Faquier Counties. November 28-December 3. Expedition from Winchester to near Gordonsville December 19-28. Liberty Mills December 22. Near Gordonsville December 23. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley till July, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 73 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 92 Enlisted men by disease. Total 173.

From Frederick Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, p. 1690





Unit History – 1st U. S. Cavalry

20 06 2022

On the Pacific Coast till November, 1861. Concentrated at Washington, D. C., November, 1861, to January, 1862. (Cos. “D” and “G” in New Mexico. Evacuation of Forts Breckenridge and Buchanan. Stationed at Fort Craig. Defence of Fort Craig January-February, 1862. Near Fort Craig February 19. Action at Valverde February 21. Apache Canon, near Santa Fe, March 26. Glorietta or Pigeon Ranch March 28. Albuquerque April 25. Peralta April 27.) Regiment attached to Cooke’s Cavalry Reserve, Army Potomac, January to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Reserve, Army Potomac, to July, 1862. Headquarters Army Potomac to February, 1863. Reserve Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Cavalry Corps, Army Potomac, to August, 1864. 3rd (Reserve) Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to December, 1864. Headquarters Army Shenandoah to March. 1865. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division. Cavalry Corps, Army Potomac, to July, 1865.

SERVICE. — Advance on Manassas, Va. July 16-21, 1861 (Cos. “A” and “E”). Battle of Bull Run July 21 (Cos. “A” and “E”). Duty in the Defences of Washington, D. C., till March, 1862. Moved to Virginia Peninsula March. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4. Cheese Cake Church May 4. Reconnoissance to Hanover Court House May 26. Operations against Stuart June 13-15. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Gaines’ Mill June 27. Malvern Hill July 1. Reconnoissance to Charlestown, W. Va., October 16-17. Charlestown October 16. Battle of Fredericksburg. Va., December 12-15. Expedition from Potomac Creek to Richards’ and Ellis’ Fords, Rappahannock River December 29-30. Kelly’s Ford March 17, 1863. Stoneman’s Raid April 29-May 8. Brandy Station and Beverly Ford June 9. Middleburg June 19. Upperville June 21. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Williamsport. Md., July 6. Boonsboro July 8. Benevola or Beaver Creek July 9. About Funkstown July 10-13. Falling Waters July 14. Manassas Gap, Va., July 21-22. Wapping Heights and Chester Gap July 23. Kelly’s Ford July 31-August 1. Brandy Station August 1-4. In Defences of Washington till September. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Manassas Junction October 17. Bristoe Station October 18. Advance to the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Barnett’s Ford February 6-7. Custer’s Raid in Albemarle County February 28-March 1. Near Charlottesville February 29. Stannardsville March 1. Rapidan Campaign May 4-June 12. Wilderness May 5-7. Todd’s Tavern May 7-8. Sheridan’s Raid to the James River May 9-24. Ground Squirrel Church and Yellow Tavern May 11. Mechanicsville May 12. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Hanovertown Ferry and Hanovertown May 27. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Old Church and Mattadequin Creek May 30. Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, May 31 -June 1. Sheridan’s Trevillian Raid June 7-24. Trevillian Station June 11-12. Mallory’s Cross Roads June 12. Black Creek or Tunstall Station and White House or St. Peter’s Church June 21. Jones’ Bridge June 23. Siege of Petersburg till August. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Malvern Hill July 28. Sheridan’s Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Toll Gate, near White Post, and near Newtown. August 11. Near Strasburg August 14. Summit Point August 21. Halltown and near Kearneysville August 25. Leetown and Smithfleld August 28. Smithfield crossing of the Opequan, August 29. Locke’s Ford, Opequan Creek, September 13. Sevier’s Ford, Opequan Creek September 15. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Fisher’s Hill September 21. Milford September 22. Front Royal September 23. Luray Valley September 24. Port Republic September 26-27. Rockfish Gap September 28. Mt. Crawford October 2. Tom’s Brook. Woodstock Races, October 8-9. Expedition into Surrey County October 16-18. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Near Kernstown November 11. Expedition into Loudoun and Fauquier counties November 28-December 3. Expedition from Winchester to near Gordonsville December 19-28. Liberty Mills December 22. Near Gordonsville December 23. Sheridan’s Raid from Winchester February 27-March 25. 1865. Occupation of Staunton March 2. Action at Waynesborough March 2. Duguidsville March 8. Appomattox Campaign March 28- April 9. Dinwiddle Court House March 30-31. Five Forks April 1. Scott’s Cross Roads April 2. Tabernacle Church or Beaver Pond Creek April 4. Sailor’s Creek April 6. Appomattox Station April 8. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Expedition to Danville April 23-29. Moved to Washington, D. C, May. Grand Review May 23. Ordered to New Orleans, La., and duty there till December, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 73 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 91 Enlisted men by disease. Total 175.

From Frederick Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, pp. 1689-1690





Unit History – 8th U. S. Infantry

20 06 2022

In Texas January, 1861. Forced to surrender while en route north. “C” at San Antonio April 22, “A” and “D” at Indianola April 24, and Companies “B,” “E,” “F,” “H,” “I” and “K” at San Lucas Springs May 9, 1861. Company “G” attached to Porter’s Brigade, Hunter’s Division, McDowell’s Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Advance on Manassas. Va., July 16-21. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Company “F” reached Washington, D. C., July, 1861. Companies “F” and “G” attached to Porter’s City Guard, Washington, D. C., to March, 1862. Provost Guard, Headquarters, Army Potomac, to July, 1863 (Cos. “A,” “B,” “D,” “F,” “G”). Dept. of the East to April, 1864. Provost Guard, 9th Army Corps, Army Potomac, to October, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to November, 1864. Baltimore, Md., 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to August, 1865.

SERVICE.— Duty in the Defences of Washington, D. C., till March, 1862. Moved to Virginia Peninsula. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Expedition up the Pamunkey May 17. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Mechanicsville June 26. Gaines’ Mill June 27. Tur-key Bridge June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. Movement to Alexandria August 16-23. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. (Co. “B” joined at Sharpsburg October 3. 1862.) At Sharpsburg, Md., till October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6, 1863. (Co. “C” joined at Falmouth, Va., April 18, 1863.) Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Ordered to New York July 15. At City Hall Park, New York July 17-30, and on the Battery, New York, till August 22. At Forts in N. Y. Harbor till April 23, 1864. Moved to Washington, D. C., April 23. Rapidan Campaign May 4-June 12. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-21; North Anna River May 22-26; Totopotomoy May 28-31; Cold Harbor June 1-12; Bethesda Church June 1-3. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16-November 2. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run. October 27-28. Moved to Buffalo, N. Y., November 2, thence to Baltimore, Md., November 22, and duty there till August, 1865.

Companies “C” and “D” reached Washington, D. C., April, 1862. Attached to Defences of Washington, to May, 1862. Cooper’s 1st Brigade, Sigel’s Division, Dept. of the Shenandoah, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army Potomac, September, 1862. Joined other Companies at Headquarters Army Potomac. Moved to Harper’s Ferry, W. Va., May 24, 1862. Defence of Harper’s Ferry May 24-30. Operations in the Shenandoah Valley till August. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope’s Virginia Campaign August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 20-23. Sulphur Springs August 26. Plains of Manassas August 27-29. Battle of Bull Run August 30. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 15 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 47 Enlisted men by disease. Total 67.

From Frederick Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, pp. 1711-1712