Fundraiser for Carnegie Free Library, Carnegie, PA

18 11 2010

Friend Jon-Erik Gilot, who is working with the manuscript collection there, informs me that a fundraiser is to be held on Saturday, November 27 at the Carnegie Free Library, Carnegie, PA.  A film, The Angel of Marye’s Heights, will be shown in the music hall, a cool room in and of itself; I’m told proceeds from the ticket sales going toward the library and its Civil War collection.  After the movie, the Espy Post GAR room (above via the Pittsburgh Post Gazette) will be open for tours, with additional artifacts from the collection on display.  I’ve written about the room before here, but you can see more on the manuscript and artifact collection here.  In short, the room was pretty much sealed up in the ’30’s after the vets stopped meeting, with all contents left in place (pretty much).  Back in the 80’s it was opened up and the whole room and much of the contents restored over a 20 year period.  It’s something to see.  The library also has a Civil War collection on display in another area.

Details on this event are available here.

More on Wa-Po’s Sesqui Ops

17 11 2010

Dmitri  has weighed in on the Washington Post’s panel of historians and their thoughts on the Civil War Sesquicentennial.  Check it out here and here.  As a reminder, I wrote about it here.

Considering that much of the country will experience the Sesquicentennial at one of our National Parks, it would have been nice if at least one representative of the NPS had contributed to this series.

Wa-Po Historians Declare How the Sesquicentennial “Should” Be Observed

16 11 2010

There’s an interesting series of opinion pieces over at the Washington Post’s House Divided site in which historians of various stripes expound on how they feel the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War should be observed.  I’m linking here to this article by Mike Musick, who has been a friend to Bull Runnings.  Links to the thoughts of other contributors can be found at the bottom of each article (I’d post each link, but it’s late and I’m tired).  I’m making my way through them and am finding a mixed bag, both in variety and quality.  One writer made the unusual declaration that any reenactments “must” include both black and white soldiers, while stressing that the “true histories” also “must” be presented.  Hmm…I’m trying to imagine how a First Bull Run reenactment could pull those two things off. 

Here’s a list of contributors:

Chandra Manning
Brent Glass
David Blight
Mike Musick
Joan Waugh
Waite Rawls
Harold Holzer
John Marszalek

More on that Logo

3 11 2010

Here’s another article about the above 150th Anniversary Manassas logo and the artist who designed it.

Manassas Civil War Commemorative Event

13 10 2010

Here is a site dedicated to events scheduled in and around the park to commemorate the Sesquicentennial.  Check it out.

Manassas Civil War Sesquicentennial

4 10 2010


The above artwork, or logo, is for the Manassas and Prince William County Civil War Sesquicentennial.  According to this story, the logo will be used to promote events and also appear on such places as t-shirts.  Now, I love a good t-shirt, if it’s a nice heavy material and a dark color and so long as large pieces are consigned to the back of the shirt where they belong – small logos in front over the breast are good.  If my stringent requirements are met I just may have to pick up one of these next time I’m down that way.

Note that the logo includes the First National Confederate flag, not the battle flag.  I think that’s appropriate for a number of reasons, including the fact that the latter banner did not exist at the time of the First (and most important) Battle of Bull Run.  The fact that the Georgia soldier depicted was not present for either battle at Manassas doesn’t bother me.

Hat tip to Kevin Levin.  Also, Facebook fan Tim Ferry passed along this article on the plans for the 150th Battle Anniversary events.

Civil War Times December 2010

1 10 2010

Inside this issue:


  • One is not mad at Gary Gallagher, one is.  Of course, the one that is mad is mad because, as we all know, Slavery had nothing to do with the Civil War, and in fact saying it did have anything to do with it should never be allowed to appear in print.  Another is mad at Gallagher because he ranked George Thomas too low as the fourth greatest Union commander.   And still another is upset with Dana Shoaf for not hammering the great villain of the war, George McClellan, hard enough in his op-ed on Stanley McChrystal.  That reader should be pleased with America’s Civil War’s November issue in which Harold Holzer goes ape-shit on Mac’s ass.


  • Brandy Station expands.  Camp Lawton site found.


  • Blue & Gray – Gary Gallagher on what Union soldiers fought for.
  • Collateral Damage – Yours Truly on Bennett Place
  • Interview – Waite Rawls of the MOC
  • Field Guide – Chris Howland at 2nd Bull Run
  • Editor Letter – Dana Shoaf on the GBPA’s endorsement of the Gettysburg Casino


  • General Disobedience – McClellan hatchetographer Edward Bonetopickemper’s hit piece on the centennial’s favorite punching bag.
  • Substitute for a Corpse – David Lowe & Philip Shiman on creative battlefield photography.
  • Joseph Whitworth’s Deadly Rifle – Fred Ray on the favorite weapon of Southern sharpshooters.
  • All Glory and No Gore – Doug Dammann on Elmer Ellsworth’s militia tour of 1860.  This is followed by a photo gallery of Ellsworth memorabilia.
  • Crisis of Faith – George Rable on spiritual revivals


  • The USS Carondelet: A Civil War Ironclad in Western Waters, by Myron J. Smith, Jr.
  • Gentlemen Merchants: A Charleston Family’s Odyssey, 1828-1870, Philip N. Racine
  • Kilted Warriors: Music of the 79th New York Volunteer Infantry, 79th Regimental Band (CD)
  • Double Death: The True Story of Pryce Lewis, the Civil War’s Most Daring Spy, Gavin Mortimer
  • Plus a list of eleven books for the holidays.


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