Bull Run Monument Dedication Hymn

15 07 2016
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First Bull Run Battle Monument Dedication

From John Hennessy:

We have come to see memorialization and remembrance of the Civil War as a tool of reconciliation. Not in 1865. Attached are the words of a hymn written for and sung at the dedication of two monuments on the Bull Run Battlefield in June 1865–monuments built by Union soldiers at the end of the war. The dedicatory ceremony attracted a huge crowd, including Generals Orlando Willcox and Samuel P. Heintzelman, who both spoke.

The words to the hymn are bitter and angry, written two months after the end of the war and Lincoln’s assassination.

After harsh lines about slavery and treason, the hymn concludes:

“And so, upon the bloody spot,
Where now this monument is raised,
Shall rebel bones and memories rot,
But patriots’ names for aye be praised.”

The words were sung to the hymn, “Old Hundred,” familiar to most today as the Doxology–sung every week in many Protestant churches.

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For more on he monument dedication, see here.

The above hymn first appeared in the New York Times on June 13, 1865, as part of an account by a correspondent who attended the dedication.





“Can You Run” – The Steeldrivers

15 06 2016

There’s smoke down by the river
Hear the cannon and the drum
I’ve got one thing to ask you honey
Can you run?

You know I hate to ask so late
But the moment’s finally come
And there won’t be time to change your mind
Can you run?

Can you run, to the freedom line of the Lincoln soldiers?
Where the contraband can be a man
With a musket on his shoulder
I’ve got to stand up tall before I’m done
Wrap these hands of mine around a gun
And chase the taste of bondage from my tongue
Can you run?
Can you run?

I’m takin nothin with me
We’ve just got time to beat the sun
And the boys in gray are never far away
Can you run?

Can you run, to the freedom line of the Lincoln soldiers?
Where the contraband can be a man
With a musket on his shoulder
I’ve got to stand up tall before I’m done
Wrap these hands of mine around a gun
And chase the taste of bondage from my tongue
Can you run?
Can you run?

There’s smoke down by the river
Hear the cannon and the drum
And even if I die, I’ve got to try
Can you run?

Can you run, to the freedom line of the Lincoln soldiers?
Where the contraband can be a man
With a musket on his shoulder
I’ve got to stand up tall before I’m done
Wrap these hands of mine around a gun
And chase the taste of bondage from my tongue
Can you run?
Can you run?

Can you run?
Can you run?





A Couple of Fun Clips

7 10 2015

First up is this music video, in which even the songwriter can’t resist a Mac Smack (that’s OK – the NPS seems to have a go-to when losing a crowd: “Take a swipe at McClellan – it’ll get ’em on your side!”)

And here’s a “web series” episode of “Star Trek Continued.” My friend Jerry hipped me to this. It’s all pretty cool, and captures the feel of the original series. In this one, Kirk and McCoy are transported to the American Civil War and…well, you be the judge.





Give This a Listen

26 08 2015

Justin Townes Earle – “Lone Pine Hill”





There Stands Jackson

22 07 2015

h/t to @oldtomfool





“Blind Tom” Wiggins – Battle of Manassas

21 04 2014

See here for more on “Blind Tom” Wiggins.

 





David Kincaid – The Boys That Wore the Green

20 04 2014

Fun stuff. Listen along – can you figure out who everyone is?








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