#1 – Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell

11 12 2020

Report of Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell, U. S. Army. [On the Action at Vienna, June 17, 1861]

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, pp 124-125

Headquarters Department Northeastern Virginia,
Arlington, June 18, 1861.

I have the honor to inclose a copy of my written instructions to General Schenck, under which his movement was made yesterday afternoon. The point to which it was intended the regiment should go by train, and establish itself for the twenty-four hours, had been occupied, for the day before, by the Sixty-ninth New York Regiment, under Colonel Hunter, commanding the brigade. The latter regiment had been sent there, on the return of General Tyler from his reconnaissance up the road, as an advance guard and a protection to the road, which had been repaired in anticipation of the demonstration I was to make on the notification of the General-in-Chief in favor of the attack on Harper’s Ferry. It is said the attack on the Ohio regiment was made by the South Carolinians. If so, they must have been moved forward from Centreville, where they have been stationed for some time past. This would seem to indicate that the reports of an advance of troops to their posts in front of this position are well founded. I have asked if it would accord with the plans of the General-in-Chief that a movement be made in force in the direction of Vienna, near which the attack was made. I learn from a reliable source that the force at Fairfax Court-House has been increased. Had the attack not been made, I would not suggest this advance at this time; but now that it has, I think it would not be well for us to seem even to withdraw. General Schenck applies for permission to send a flag of truce to Vienna to bury his dead and care for his wounded. I do not think this necessary for either purpose, but think the morale of the troops would be increased if they went over the ground again with arms in their hands. The distance by turnpike from Falls Church to Vienna is about six miles.

General Tyler, who is in advance, sends me word that he sees the country as far as Falls Church. No signs of any movement. He wants no more troops than he has, unless it is intended to hold permanently the position he occupies.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Irvin McDowell,
Brigadier General, Commanding.

Lieut. Col. E. D. Townsend,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Army, Washington.

[Inclosure.]

Headquarters Department Northeastern Virginia,
Arlington, June 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General Schenck, Commanding Ohio Brigade:

Sir: The general commanding directs that you send one of the regiments of your command, on a train of cars, up the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad to the point where it crosses the wagon-road running from Fort Corcoran, opposite Georgetown, southerly into Virginia.

The regiment, being established at that point, will, by suitable patrols, feel the way along the road towards Falls Church and Vienna, moving, however, with caution, and making it a special duty to guard effectually the railroad bridges and to look to the track. The regiment will go supplied for a tour of duty of twenty-four hours, and will move on the arrival at your camp of a train of cars ordered for that purpose, and will relieve all the troops of Colonel Hunter’s brigade now guarding the line.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY,
Assistant Adjutant-General.





Lt. Col. Edward D. Townsend, Army AAG, to McDowell on Diminishing His Command

15 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 755-756

Headquarters Army, July 22,1861.

Brigadier-General McDowell, U. S. A, Arlington, Va.:

Captain Wright, Engineers, is detached from your department. Send another engineer in his place.

For the garrison of the forts and their support, fifteen regiments and such field batteries as you deem necessary will be retained in your department. The General-in-Chief desires you to send over to this side all the remaining troops and all the wagons and teams not absolutely needed for your purposes.

Send in the wagons all the camp equipage not required by your fifteen regiments.

E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General.


Headquarters Army, July 22,1861.

General McDowell, U. S. A., Arlington:

General Scott says it is not intended you should reduce your command to the minimum number of regiments mentioned by him (fifteen) to-day, but if the enemy will permit, you can take to-morrow or even the next day for the purpose.

E. D. TOWNSEND.





Brig. Gen. Joseph K. F. Mansfield, Commander of Dept. of Washington, To Commander of Washington Navy Yard Cmdr. John A. B. Dahlgren, McDowell, and Runyon, on Troop Movements

11 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 751

July 21,1861.

Commander Dahlgren, Navy-Yard:

Send an armed vessel at once to Alexandria, to command as much as possible the approaches to Alexandria.

MANSFIELD, Brigadier- General.


July 21,1861.

Brigadier-General McDowell, at Fairfax Court-House:

By General Scott’s orders I send you four regiments, brigaded under Colonel McCunn, to Fairfax Station, to wit: the Thirty-seventh, Colonel McCunn, Fifteenth, Colonel Murphy; Twenty-sixth, Colonel Christian; Twenty-fifth, Colonel Kerrigan.

They should all be at the point above designated by 6 p. m.

They have three days’ supply of rations.

MANSFIELD, Brigadier- General.

[All of the regiments mentioned are New York Infantry.]


July 21,1861.

General Runyon, Alexandria:

Hold my two last regiments at Alexandria and man your lines.

McDowell is on the retreat.

MANSFIELD, Brigadier- General.





Col. Thomas A. Scott Communicates with PA Gov. Andrew Curtin, McDowell, and Sam. D. Young, Pennsylvania Railroad, on Troop Movements

10 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 749-751

[July 21,1861.]

Hon. A. G. Curtin, Harrisburg:

Get your regiments at Harrisburg, Easton, and other points ready for immediate shipment. Lose no time preparing.

Make things move to the utmost.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

To Operator:

Under no circumstances let this message be made public.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.


July 21,1861.

Governor Curtin, Harrisburg:

Forward all you can to-night. Transportation will be provided by Northern Central Company.

Press forward all available forces.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.


[July 21,1861.]

Governor Curtin:

Do not lose a moment in sending Wisconsin and your own regiments. Start them before daylight in the morning.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.


Harrisburg, July 21,1861.

T. A. S. [Col. T. A. Scott]:

One regiment left for Washington noon; one from Pittsburgh and one from West Chester have just arrived; one from Pittsburgh and two from Easton will arrive to-morrow; the others as rapidly as can be transported to and from this place.

The three-months’ regiments are arriving here without being announced or any preparation for them.

Du Barry seems hardly to know what to do.

Our men justly complain of their arms—those that came and those we send here. They complain the more, as a Wisconsin regiment refused to take the same kind of arms, and the colonel went to Washington, and was given the best modern arms.

Will you not use your influence to get better arms for these three-years’ men?

A. G. CURTIN, Governor.


July 21,1861.

General McDowell:

Do you want re-enforcements at Fairfax Court-House? There are three regiments at Fairfax Station on the railroad, within three miles of you; and we have another regiment loaded on cars at Springfield Station, which can reach you in three hours, if you say send them.

We also have a regiment at the railroad station in Alexandria, which can reach Fairfax Court-House in four hours.

Give instructions immediately.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.


July 21,1861.

Sam. D. Young:

If any troops or regiments are on the Cumberland Valley on their way to Hagerstown, tell Lull to stop them at first station, and return them to Baltimore without transshipment. This is the wish of Commander-in-Chief.

Keep this information quiet. Ascertain and report movements.

You will also aid with cars and other facilities, if necessary, at Harrisburg to forward troops to Washington.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

Under no circumstances let this message be made public. T. A. S.

Thomas A. Scott at Wikipedia

Samuel D. Young was superintendent of the middle division of the Pennsylvania Railroad

Ormond N. Lull was superintendent of the Cumberland Valley Railroad





Colonel John H. McCunn, 37th New York Infantry, and Colonel Dwight A. Woodbury, 4th Michigan Infantry, Communicate with McDowell and Army HQ

8 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 748

Fairfax, July 21, 1861.

General McDowell:

I have learned from my scouts that large trees are felled across the turnpike on road from here to Alexandria. Things are looking ugly here.

McCUNN.


Fairfax Court-House, July 21,1861—9.10 p. m.

Col. E. D. Townsend:

We are reliably informed that the enemy’s cavalry will attack us on the left to-night.

Send instructions.

D. A. WOODBURY,
Colonel, Commanding [Fourth Michigan Infantry].


Fairfax Station, July 21,1861—11.5.

Lieutenant-General Scott:

Orders have arrived that no more regiments are to come here from Alexandria to-night.

I have placed myself in best position. Have removed obstructions of slide from railroad track.

I have no communication from General McDowell.

I am guarding the roads lest a surprise.

Colonel Woodbury telegraphed me that he expects an attack from cavalry. What shall I do?

McCUNN,
Thirty-Seventh New York Volunteers.


Washington, July 21,1861—11.45 p. m.

Colonel McCunn, Fairfax Station:

General McDowell is at Fairfax Court-House, where he will try to make a stand. Communicate with him there, and also let Colonel Woodbury know.

WINFIELD SCOTT.





Scott Advises McDowell of Available Resources and Options

7 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 747-748

Headquarters Army, July 21, 1861.

General McDowell, Fairfax Court-House;

Three regiments—Woodbury’s, McCunn’s, and another, name not known—are at Fairfax Station.

A commissary train is stopped a little way out of Alexandria with a drove of cattle. Call it up, if you mean to risk a stand; but under the circumstances it seems best to return to the line of the Potomac.

WINFIELD SCOTT.


Headquarters of the Army,
July 21,1861—9 p. m.

General McDowell, Centreville:

Besides three regiments sent you by General Runyon from the reserve, four regiments have crossed the river to-day. Two of the latter we know have reached Fairfax Station. The other two must be there in a few minutes. We suppose you to have rallied your army at Centreville, or, at the worst, you will rally at Fairfax Court-House and Fairfax Station. We know that you and your experienced officers will do all that is proper and possible. A company of regulars has also gone over. Additional re-enforcements shall follow early to-morrow. We are not discouraged.

WINFIELD SCOTT.





McDowell Reports “The Day is Lost”

6 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 747

July 21,1861.

General McDowell’s army in full retreat through Centreville.

The day is lost. Save Washington and the remnants of this army.

All available troops ought to be thrown forward in one body.

General McDowell is doing all he can to cover the retreat. Colonel Miles is forming for that purpose. He was in reserve at Centreville.

The routed troops will not reform.

B. S. ALEXANDER,
Captain, Corps Engineers.*

[*Capt. Barton Stone Alexander was assigned to the staff of Brig. Gen. Daniel Tyler]

Barton Stone Alexander at Wikipedia

Barton Stone Alexander at Fold3

Barton Stone Alexander at FindAGrave





McDowell Calls for Reinforcements

5 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 746-747

Centreville, [July] 21,1861.

Colonel Townsend :

Captain Fry writes to me to say, u Telegraph to Washington: Send on immediately all the troops that can be spared.” Colonel Hunter has just arrived, badly wounded.

D. S. MILES,
Colonel.

Fairfax Court-House, July 21,1861—5.15 o’clock.

General Scott :

I am directed to send the accompanying dispatch to you or to deliver in person.

HANSCON.

Centreville, July 21—4 p. m. Adjutant-General Thomas:

General McDowell wishes all the troops that can he sent from Washington to come here without delay. He has ordered the reserve now here under Colonel Miles to advance to the bridge over Bull Run, on the Warrenton road, having driven the enemy before him. Colonel Miles is now about three or four miles from here, directing operations near Blackburn’s Ford, and in his absence I communicate.

G. H. MENDELL,
First Lieutenant, Topographical Engineers.





Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Informs McDowell of Confederate Reinforcements from Winchester, and of Forwarding of Four Regiments from Washington

4 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 746

Headquarters of the Army,
Washington, July 21,1861.

Brigadier-General McDowell, Commanding, &c.:

It is known that a strong re-enforcement left Winchester on the afternoon of the 18th, which you will also have to beat. Four new regiments will leave to-day to be at Fairfax Station to-night. Others shall follow to-morrow: twice the number, if necessary.

WINFIELD SCOTT.





Army Headquarters Notifies McDowell of Forwarding of Hunt’s Battery and Forty Recruits

4 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, p. 746

Headquarters of the Army,
July 20, 1861—1.30 a. m.

Brigadier-General McDowell, &c., Centreville:

Your dispatch received at 1.5 a. m.* It is now 1.30 a. m.

Hunt’s battery left here at 5 a. m. yesterday by Fairfax road. We have but forty recruits; orders have been given to send them forward. It will be some time before they reach you, as there is no officer to spare to send with them.

By command of General Scott:

SCHUYLER HAMILTON,
Lieutenant-Colonel and Military Secretary.

*See p. 307. (Letter dated July 19, 1861, to “Colonel.”)