Unit History – 8th Georgia Infantry

2 06 2022

Organized by Colonel F. S. Bartow during the spring of 1861. All of its companies had seen prior military service in the Georgia militia and were from Rome, Savannah, and Atlanta, and the counties of Greene, Echols, Pulaski, and Floyd. Early in June the unit was ordered to Virginia and, assigned to F. S. Bartow’s Brigade, fought at First Manassas. In April, 1862, it had but 251 men fit for duty and for the balance of the war served under G. T. Anderson. The 8th was involved in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, except when it was with Longstreet at Suffolk, in Georgia, and at Knoxville. It did not take part in the Battle of Chickamauga. The unit participated in the Petersburg siege south and north of the James River and later the Appomattox Campaign. It reported 41 killed and 159 wounded at First Manassas, had 28 killed, 65 wounded, and 11 missing during the Seven Days’ Battles, and lost 8 killed and 54 wounded at Second Manassas. It lost more than 50 percent of the 312 engaged at Gettysburg, and from April 14 to May 6, there were 92 disabled, and from August 1 to December 31, 1864, the regiment had 82 killed or wounded. At the surrender it contained 14 officers and 139 men. The field officers were Colonels F. S. Bartow, William M. Gardner, L. M. Lamar, and John R. Towers; Lieutenant Colonels Thomas L. Cooper and Edward J. Magruder; Majors John F. Cooper and Goerge O. Dawson.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 89





Unit History – 7th Georgia Infantry

2 06 2022

Was formed in May, 1861, at Atlanta, Georgia, and in June moved to Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. Its members were raised in the counties of Coweta, Paulding, De Kalb, Franklin, Fulton, Heard, and Cobb. Assigned to Colonel F. S. Bartow’s Brigade, Army of the Shenandoah, it was active in the fight at First Manassas. In April, 1862, the regiment had 611 effectives and served under the command of G. T. Anderson until the end of the war. It participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, except when it was detached with Longstreet at Suffolk, in Georgia, and at Knoxville. The 7th was not involved in the Battle of Chickamauga. It was active in the long Petersburg siege south and north of the James River and later in the Appomattox Campaign. It reported 153 casualties at First Manassas, 147 during the Seven Days’ Battles, and 120 at Second Manassas. Losses were light at Fredericksburg and Gettysburg, but from April 14 to May 6 there were 98 disabled, and from August 1 to December 31, 1864, the unit had 56 killed or wounded. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 24 officers and 164 men. The field officers were Colonels George H. Carmical, Lucius J. Gartrell, William W. White, and William T. Wilson; Lieutenant Colonels Moses T. Almon, James F. Cooper, and John Dunwoody; Majors Lemuel B. Anderson, E. W. Hoyle, John F. Kiser, and Horace H. Witt.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 88