Unit History – 7th Virginia Infantry

24 05 2022

Was organized in May, 1861, at Manassas Junction, Virginia, with men from Giles, Madison, Rappahannock, Culpeper, Green, and Albemarle counties. It fought at First Manassas under General Early, then served with Ewell, A. P. Hill, Kemper, and W. R. Terry. In Apri, 1862, the regiment had 700 effectives and later was active in the various campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Gettysburg. It participated in Longstreet’s Suffolk expedition, was prominent in the capture of Plymouth, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. The 7th continued the fight in the Petersburg trenches south of the James River and around Appomattox. It sustained 47 casualties at First Manassas, 77 at Williamsburg, 111 at Frayser’s Farm, 59 at Second Manassas, and 4 at Fredericksburg. Of the 335 engaged at Gettysburg about forty percent were disabled. It lost 39 men at Drewry’s Bluff, and many were captured at Five Forks and Sayler’s Creek. Only 20 officers and men were present at the surrender. Its commanders were Colonels Charles C. Flowerree, James L. Kemper, and Walter T. Patton; Lieutenant Colonel L. B. Williams; and Major Aylett A. Swindler.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 358-359





Unit History – 13th Mississippi Infantry

23 05 2022

Completed its organization at Corinth, Mississippi, in May, 1861. Its members were raised in the counties of Lauderdale, Winston, Wayne, Attala, Newton, Chickasaw, Kemper, and Clarke. Ordered to Virginia it saw action at First Manassas and Leesburg, and in April, 1862, totalled 640 effectives. The unit was brigaded under Generals Griffith, Barksdale, and Humphreys, Army of Northern Virginia. It fought with the army from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, except when it was with Longstreet at Chickamauga and Knoxville. After participating in Early’s operations in the Shenandoah Valley, the 13th shared in various conflicts around Appomattox. It was organized with 1,200 men and sustained 7 casualties at Leesburg and 135 during the Seven Days’ Battles. It lost thirty-one percent of the 202 engaged at Sharpsburg, had 8 killed, 59 wounded, and 14 missing at Fredericksburg, and of the 481 at Gettysburg, thirty-four percent were disabled. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 4 officers and 81 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William Barksdale, James W. Carter, and Kennon McElroy; Lieutenant Colonels John M. Bradley, Alfred G. O’Brien, and M. Whitaker; and Majors George L. Donald and Isham Harrison.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 174-175





Unit History – 24th Virginia Infantry

23 05 2022

Was assembled in June, 1861, with men from Floyd, Franklin, Carroll, Giles, Pulaski, Mercer, and Henry Counties. It served under Early at First Manassas, then was assigned to Early’s, Kemper’s. and W. R. Terry’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 24th participated in the campaigns of the army from Williamsburg to Gettysburg except when it was detached to Suffolk with Longstreet. Later it was involved in the engagements at Plymouth and Drewry’s Bluff, the Petersburg siege north of the James River, and the Appomattox operations. The regiment contained 740 men n April, 1862, and reported 189 casualties at Williamsburg and 107 at Seven Pines. It lost 4 killed, 61 wounded, and 14 missing at Frayser’s Farm, had 8 wounded at Fredericksburg, and had about 40 percent of the 395 engaged at Gettysburg disabled. Many were lost at Sayler’s Creek, and no officers and 22 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Jubal A. Early and William A. Terry; Lieutenant Colonels Peter Hairston, Jr. and Richard L. Maury; and Majors William W. Bentley, Joseph A. Hambrick, and J. P. Hammer.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 373





Unit History – 7th Louisiana Infantry

22 05 2022

(Also called the Pelican Regiment) was organized in May, 1861, and entered Confederate service at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in June. The men were from New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Donaldsonville, and Livingston. Ordered to Virginia with more than 850 men, the unit served under General Early at First Manassas. Later it was brigaded under R. Taylor, Hays, and York. It was prominent in Jackson’s Valley Campaign and on many battlefields of the Army of Northen Virginia. The 7th served from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, then was involved in Early’s operations in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox Campaign. It took 827 men to First Manassas, had 132 disabled at Cross Keys and Port Republic, and lost 68 during the Seven Days’ Battles and 69 in the Maryland Campaign. The unit sustained 80 casualties at Chancellorsville and 24 at Second Winchester, lost twenty-four percent of the 235 engaged at Gettysburg, and had 180 captured at Rappahannock Station. It surrendered with no officers and 42 men. The field officers were Colonels Harry T. Hays and Davidson B. Penn, Lieutenant Colonels Charles DeChoiseul and Thomas M. Terry, and Major J. Moore Wilson.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 145





Unit History – Lynchburg Artillery (Latham’s-Blount’s Battery)

22 05 2022

Completed its organization at Lynchburg, Virginia, in April, 1861. After taking an active part in the Battle of First Manassas, the unit was assigned to J. Dearing’s, H. P. Jones’, J. P. W. Read’s (38th Battalion), and R. M. Stribling’s Battalion of Artillery. It fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Gettysburg, moved to North Carolina, and later was involved in the Plymouth expedition. Returning to Virginia it was active on the Bermuda Hundred line and saw action at Cold Harbor and in front of Petersburg. It sustained 10 casualties of the 96 engaged at Gettysburg, and many were captured at Rice’s Station on April 6, 1865. It surrendered at Appomattox with only 3 men. Captains Joseph G. Blount, James Dearing, James W. Dickerson, and J. Gery Latham were in command.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 402-403





Unit History – Loudoun Artillery

21 05 2022

Was organized in 1859 as part of the Virginia militia and entered Confederate service in July, 1861. After fighting in the Battle of First Manassas it served with the Army of Northern Virginia from Seven Pines to Sharpsburg. During October, 1862, the unit disbanded and its members transferred to the Fauquier Light Artillery. It was commanded by Captain Arthur L. Rogers.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 404





Unit History – 49th Virginia Infantry (Battalion)

21 05 2022

Completed its organization in July, 1861. Its members were from the counties of Prince William, Warren, Fauquier, Rappahannock, Amherst, and Shenandoah. Three companies fought at First Manassas and these companies formed the nucleus of the regiment. It was assigned to General Featherston’s, Early’s, W. Smith’s, Pegram’s, and J. A. Walker’s Brigade, Army of Northen Virginia. The unit participated in many battles from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, was active in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations, and took part in the final campaign at Appomattox. It reported 40 casualties at First Manassas and in April, 1862, contained 539 effectives. The regiment lost fifty-three percent of the 424 at Seven Pines, had 2 killed and 36 2ounded during the Seven Days’ Battles, and suffered 5 killed and 73 wounded in the Maryland Campaign. At Fredericksburg 6 were killed and 46 wounded, at Gettysburg thirty-five percent of the 281 were disabled, and at The Wilderness and Spotsylvania 87 were lost. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 9 officers and 46 men. The field officers were Colonels John C. Gibson and William Smith, Lieutenant Colonels Charles B. Christian and Edward Murray, and Major Caleb Smith.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 386-387





Unit History – 28th Virginia Infantry

20 05 2022

Completed its organization at Lynchburg, Virginia, in June, 1861. Its members were raised in the counties of Botetourt, Craig, Bedford, Campbell, and Roanoke. After fighting at First Manassas the unit was assigned to General Pickett’s, Garnett’s, and Hunton’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It was active in the campaigns of the army from Williamsburg to Gettysburg except wen it served with Longstreet at Suffolk. The 29th moved to North Carolina, then was on detached duty at Richmond. It fought at Cold Harbor, endured the battles and hardships of the Petersburg trenches, and was engaged in various conflicts around Appomattox. The regiment totalled 600 men in April, 1862, and reported 40 casualties at Williamsburg and 47 at Seven Pines. It lost 12 killed and 52 wounded at Second Manassas, had 8 killed and 54 wounded during the Maryland Campaign, and, of the 333 engaged at Gettysburg, half were disabled. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 3 officers and 51 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Robert C. Allen, Robert T. Preston, and William Watts; Lieutenant Colonels Samuel B. Paul and William L. Wingfield; and Majors Michael P. Spessard and Nathaniel C. Wilson.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, p. 376





Unit History – 19th Virginia Infantry

19 05 2022

Organized at Manassas Junction, Virginia, in May, 1861, contained men recruited at Charlottesville and in the counties of Albemarle, Nelson, and Amherst. It fought at First Manassas under General Cocke, then was assigned to General Pickett’s, Garnett’s, and Hunton’s Brigade. The 19th participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Gettysburg except when it was with Longstreet at Suffolk. Later it served in North Carolina, returned to Virginia, and was active at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Continuing the fight, it was engaged in the Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. It reported 6 casualties at First Manassas and in April, 1862, totalled 650 effectives. The regiment had 138 casualties during the Seven Days’ Battles and lost forty-two percent of the 150 in the Maryland Campaign and more than forty-five percent of the 328 engaged Gettysburg. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and only 1 officer and 29 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels P. St. George Cocke, Henry Gantt, Armistead T. M. Rust, and John B. Strange; Lieutenant Colonels John T. Ellis, Charles S. Peyton, and Bennett Taylor; and Majors Waller M. Boyd and William Watts.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 369-370





Unit History – 18th Virginia Infantry

19 05 2022

Completed its organization in May, 1861. Its members were recruited at Danville and Farmville, and in the counties of Nottoway, Cumberland, Prince Edward, Appomattox, Pittsylvania, and Charlotte. The unit fought at First Manassas under General Cocke, then was assigned to General Pickett’s, Garnett’s, and Hunton’s Brigade. It participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Gettysburg except when it was detached to Suffolk with Longstreet. Later it served in North Carolina, returned to Virginia, and took an active part in the battles at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. The 18th endured the hardships of the Petersburg trenches north of the James River and saw action around Appomattox. It lost 6 killed and 12 wounded at First Manassas and in April, 1862, had 700 men fit for duty. The unit reported 206 casualties during the Seven Days’ Battles, and of the 120 engaged in the Maryland Campaign, thirty-six percent were disabled. In the fight at Gettysburg more than seventy-five percent of the 312 in action were killed, wounded, or missing. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek and only 2 officers and 32 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels Henry A. Carrington and Robert E. Withers, Lieutenant Colonel George C. Cabell, and Major Edwin G. Wall.

From Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Units of the Confederate States Army, pp. 368-369