Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee to Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke, Directing Him to Recruit and Form Companies in Northern Virginia

21 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 798-799

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Fa., May 3, 1861.

General P. St. George Cocke, Alexandria, Va.:

General: Under the authority of the governor of Virginia, by his proclamation of the 3d instant, you are hereby authorized to call out and muster into the service of the Slate volunteer companies from the counties of Alexandria, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, Fauquier, Bappahannock, Culpeper, Madison, Greene, Orange, Albemarle, Nelson, Amherst, Campbell, Bedford, Boanoke, Botetourt, and Craig. The troops from the first five named counties may be directed to rendezvous at Leesburg and Warrenton, as you may find most advantageous. Those from the five next named at Culpeper Court-House; those from Albemarle, Nelson, and Amherst at Charlottesville; the remainder at Lynchburg. The whole number of companies thus called into service, including those now in the service of the State and under your command, will not exceed ten regiments of infantry and rifles, two of cavalry, and eight companies of artillery. You will organize them into regiments, associating, as far as possible, companies from the same section of the State, and place them temporarily under such officers as may be available until their proper field officers can be appointed by the governor. It will be necessary to send officers to the respective rendezvous, to muster them into the service, and it is hoped that you will be able to rapidly organize the whole force. You are desired to report as soon as practicable the number of companies mustered into the service of the State, their arms, condition, &c. You will give directions to the mustering officers to select from the companies that offer those that are best armed and instructed and give promise of efficient service.

Yery respectfully, &c.,

R. E. LEE,
Major-General, Commanding.





Gov. John Letcher – A Proclamation to the Citizens of Virginia

21 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 797-798

Richmond, May 3, 1861.

By the Governor of Virginia.

A PROCLAMATION.

The sovereignty of the Commonwealth of Virginia having been denied, her territorial rights assailed, her soil threatened with invasion by the authorities at Washington, and every artifice employed which could inflame the people of the Northern States and misrepresent our purposes and wishes, it becomes the solemn duty of every citizen of this State to prepare for the impending conflict. These misrepresentations have been carried to such extent that foreigners and naturalized citizens who but a few years ago were denounced by the North and deprived of essential rights have now been induced to enlist into regiments for the purpose of invading this State, which then vindicated those rights and effectually resisted encroachments which threatened their destruction. Against such a policy and against a force which the Government at Washington, relying upon its numerical strength, is now rapidly concentrating, it becomes the State of Virginia to prepare proper safeguards. To this end and for these purposes, and with a determination to repel invasion, I, John Letcher, governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, by authority of the Convention, do hereby authorize the commanding general of the military forces of this State to call out and cause to be mustered into the service of Virginia, from time to time, as the public exigencies may require, such additional number of volunteers as he may deem necessary.

To facilitate this call the annexed schedule will indicate the places of rendezvous at which the companies called for will assemble upon receiving orders for service.

Given under my hand, as governor, and under the seal of the Commonwealth, at Richmond, this third day of May, 1861, and in the eighty-fifth year of the Commonwealth.

JOHN LETCHER.

By the governor:
George W. Munford,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.





Col. Robert S. Garnett, Adjutant-General, Va. Provisional Army, to Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cocke, on Arms and Defenses of Alexandria

21 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 794-795

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 2,1861.

General P. St. George Cocke:

General: The commanding general has to-day ordered two hundred flint-lock muskets, with fifty rounds of ammunition for each, to be sent without delay to Alexandria, for the troops in and around that point. You are requested to notify the officer in command of the fact.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant-General.


Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 2, 1861.

Brigadier-General Cocke, Virginia Volunteers:

General: You were telegraphed this morning to place Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor or other experienced officer in command of the troops in and about Alexandria. The general directs that he be instructed to take measures to secure the guns, ammunition, and provisions, and to unite with the officers of the railroad companies in securing all the rolling stock of their roads, and in effectually breaking up the roads themselves, should he be driven by force from that point.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. GARNETT,
Adjutant- General.





Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee to Col. Thomas J. Jackson Directing Him to Recruit and Form Companies at Harper’s Ferry

21 11 2020

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861

CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – CONFEDERATE

O. R. – Series I – VOLUME 2 [S #2] CHAPTER IX, pp. 793-794

Headquarters Virginia Forces,
Richmond, Va., May 1,1861.

Col. T. J. Jackson, Commanding Harper’s Ferry, Va.:

Colonel: Under authority of the governor of the State, you are directed to call out volunteer companies from the counties in the valley adjacent to Harper’s Ferry, viz, Morgan, Berkeley, Jefferson, Hampshire, Hardy, Frederick, and Clarke, including the troops you may muster in at Harper’s Ferry, not counting five regiments of infantry, one regiment of cavalry, and two batteries of light artillery, of four pieces each. The average number of enlisted men in each company will be eighty-two, and the troops will be directed to rendezvous at Harper’s Ferry. You will select, as far as possible, uniformed companies with arms, organize them into regiments under the senior captains, until proper field officers can be appointed. You will report the number of companies accepted in the service of the State under this authority, their description, arms, &c. Five hundred Louisiana troops, said to be en route for this place, will be directed to report to you, and you will make provision accordingly.

You are desired to urge the transfer of all the machinery, materials, &c., from Harper’s Ferry, as fast as possible, and have it prepared in Winchester for removal to Strasburg, whence it will be ordered to a place of safety. The machinery ordered to this place must be forwarded with dispatch, as has already been directed. The remainder will await at Strasburg further orders. All the machinery of the rifle factory, and everything of value therein, will be also removed as rapidly as your means will permit. If the troops can be advantageously used in the removal of the machinery, they will be so employed. It is thought probable that some attack may be made upon your position from Pennsylvania, and you will keep yourself as well informed as possible of any movements against you. Should it become necessary to the defense of your position, you will destroy the bridge across the Potomac. You are particularly directed to keep your plans and operations secret, and endeavor to prevent their being published in the papers of the country.

I am, sir, &c.,

R. E. LEE,
Major-General, Commanding.