UPDATE – Bull Runnings Photography Tour, June 9, 2018

24 05 2018

Very weird – I posted an update on May 9 about our tour coming up on June 9. Now, it’s gone! This has never happened to me in 11 years. (Ooops, I found it in my trash bin, and have restored it. But a reminder was in order anyway.) So, here we go again.  Yes, the tour is still on. Same plan (meet at 9 AM at the Manassas National Battlefield Park visitor center), at which time we’ll follow the plan laid out by guide John Cummings here. Find a reading list here. Indicate your intent to attend here if you’re a Facebooker, or send me a note at the email address in the right hand margin of this page. We have one addition – wet plate photographer Robert Szabo will be joining us in Centreville to discuss the whole Civil War era process, and to take a group photo! If you don’t know of Mr. Szabo, here’s his website, and below is a brief bio:

I have been a photographer for more than 35 years. I started shooting weddings in the 1980s and have been shooting wet plate collodion for 18 years. In April of 2005 one of my wet plate photographs appeared on the cover of National Geographic Magazine to accompany an article on the fight to save Civil War battlefields from modern development. Also in 2005 I worked with the History Channel on the Emmy Award Winning series “10 Days that Changed America”, producing many wet plate images that were used in the show. In August of 2005 I shot the entire 2006 Jack Daniel’s Squires Calendar on location in Lynchburg, Tennessee using the wet plate process. This calendar was sent out to more than 250,000 people worldwide. In 2011 I photographed actor/director Robert Redford for the cover of the April 15, 2011 issue of Parade Magazine.

I have been shooting Production Stills for Film, Television and Corporate shoots for 10 years. I have 19th century photography equipment that can be used for film props and I can replicate any photo process. I can also provide consulting for period films when scripts call for photography and cameras from the 19th century to modern day.

 


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