Preview – Sauers (Ed.), “The National Tribune Civil War Index”

30 03 2018

NTCWIndex1_LRG

Folks have been waiting a long time for something like this, though I wasn’t sure if we’d see it in expensive print format or free and easy-to-use website. The former has won out with Savas Beatie’s publication of Richard Sauers’s The National Tribune Civil War Index: A Guide to the Weekly Newspaper Dedicated to Civil War Veterans, 1877-1943. The set is three volumes, the first two a chronological listing of articles and the third, really the meat and potatoes as far as I’m concerned, a Subject, Author, and Unit Index. The subtitle gives the preview away, though I’d point out that the National Tribune was an outlet for Union Civil War veterans – the counterpart, if you will, of the Confederate Veteran, and the precursor to the long-running military publication Stars and Stripes.

This is a wonderful companion to digitized collections of National Tribune, such as this one. (There are other places to find it, and these are noted in Volume 1.)

So, let’s give it a try. Starting with Volume 3, I look up, in the Subject Index, First Bull Run. OK, nothing there. I’m used to this. So, let’s go to Bull Run – nothing. Well, let’s check Manassas then, why don’t we. Ahh, there it is. Manassas, VA. (Bull Run), first battle, July 21, 1861. We have listings by subject under that, including individuals like Ayres, Romeyn B., an article which appeared in the July 28, 1892 issue; general accounts, in May 1881 and August 20 of the same year, and again on 10/18/83 and 3/31 & 9/29/87, and 4/30/96; and numerous entries by Divisions, 1 through 5.

Now let’s see how it works, and check out that Ayres article from 7/28/92 at the link I provided above. As you can see here, there are 12 pages to that issue. I’m lazy and would like to save reading the whole paper to find my Ayers reference, so let’s use Volume 1 of the Index (1877 – 1903) and see if we can’t narrow that down. There I see an article by C. D. Brigham, General R. B. Ayres, listed as appearing on page 3, columns 4-5. Back to the website noted, I find the article, subtitled How He Covered the Retreat From the First Bull Run. Check it out for yourself right here.

If this kind of stuff floats your boat – that is, if you’re a researcher – get yourself a copy.





Preview – Loperfido (Ed.), “Death, Disease, and Life at War”

27 03 2018

Layout 1I previewed Christopher Loperfido’s A Surgeon’s Tale here back in 2011. So I’ll let that serve as part of this preview of a new Savas Beatie edition of the book, retitled (with a much appreciated Oxford comma) Death Disease, and Life at War: The Civil War Letters of Surgeon James D. Benton, 111th and 98th New York Infantry Regiments, 1862-1865. There have been changes made to this edition, and Christopher laid them out for me. I thought about rewriting this myself, but hey, seems clear enough:

  • The military organization has been cleaned up a bit to give readers a better understanding of military lingo that James might reference if they were not already aware.
  • The introduction includes all new photos and is more detailed regarding the status of the union army medical department at the beginning of the war, what an assistant surgeon would have done during the war, more background information about James and his family, and sets the stage at Harper’s Ferry for the beginning of James’s letters after the 111th was captured and paroled.
  • Footnotes have been tweaked, more information and some have been added and others subtracted.
  • A postscript section has been added about a bible James picked up during the war and returned in 1885.
  • 5 appendices were added to give an introduction to Jonathan Letterman, Sanitary Commission, Ambulance Corps, Amputations, and Civil War dressings.
  • More context about what was going on during the war in each year has been added and cleaned up as well.




Bull Runnings Tour 4/7/2018 Update – Reading List

24 03 2018

Here’s a recommended reading list for the tour. Books and some blog posts. Download whatever you think you need. If you download to a mobile device (phone, tablet), I recommend you download to the device itself, as cell reception is spotty out on the field.

Stay tuned for more news on handouts prior to our deployment.

Books:

Posts

  • Let’s start with this post from John Cummings. A primer, so to speak.
  • This post and this post from John Hennessy, about the ubiquitous Thornberry kids.
  • Here’s one from me – and it appears where I thought these photos were taken is not where they were taken at all.
  • Another one from me – a rare photo which raises more questions than it answers.




Mt. Lebanon, Pa. Boy Scout Troop 28

20 03 2018

I just spent a delightful evening speaking to a great group of kids and parents to help them prepare for a day of hiking the Gettysburg Battlefield. Just the basics of the armies involved, the personalities of the army and corps commanders, and the importance of the lessons to be learned from history (especially military history) that get kicked to the wayside a bit in this day of STEM. The kids were very engaged and asked a lot of questions, which I liked, and seemed to be appreciative of my decision to NOT do a PowerPoint presentation – they get enough of that in school these days, I think. So thank you all. I had a great time. If you have any other questions, you can fire away right here in the comments section. If I don’t know the answer, I know someone who does.

[To the dad who asked me about Gettysburg residents who fought for the Confederacy at the battle, see my preview of Tom McMillan’s Gettysburg Rebels right here.]





Tour Bull Run and Centreville in Photographs

18 03 2018

Here’s an update on where we stand with our second Bull Runnings tour, on Saturday, April 7. I’ve created this Facebook Event Page where you can register to attend and get more frequent updates. I realize some of you don’t “do The Facebook,” so you can let me know here or via email if you’re coming. Remember the tour is rain or shine, so dress appropriately, and if you’re a photo geek by all means bring your camera and take your own “now” images to pair with the “thens.” Below is the initial announcement on the event page, and an itinerary. Remember – car pooling is a must.

Tour the battlefield of First Bull Run and Centreville, VA using period photographs. Visit the sites of the photos and learn the stories behind them and their subjects from experts John Cummings and Dennis Hogge. This is a free event.

Our itinerary for the tour, from guest guide John Cummings [my comments in brackets]:

We’ll start the day (9:00 AM) in front of the Visitor’s Center, where we will begin by examining some problematic interpretations of photo locations on Henry Hill. While there, we will discuss other images taken during the first century after the battle, and the history of the park. Later we will proceed to the Sudley Church area and visit the exact location of some Union burial sites. We will proceed to a surprise Second Manassas feature [I know some of you have been yakking at me to cover the second, less important little skirmish outside Manassas, so here’s your bone!], and then to the Stone House, and Stone Bridge before breaking for lunch. After lunch we will meet with Dennis Hogge for an exploration of Centreville and the numerous photographs that document its Confederate occupation.

[During the tour, I’ll have various letters and memoirs ready that feature the sites we’ll be visiting. I’m checking with the Bull Run Winery to see if they can handle our group perhaps stopping there after the conclusion of the tour – let me know if that would be of interest to you.]

 





Preview: Hardy, “General Lee’s Immortals”

6 03 2018

GenLeeImmortals_LRG

New from Savas Beatie is a unit history by author and blogger Michael Hardy, General Lee’s Immortals: The Battles and Campaigns of the Branch-Lane Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865. Here’s a brief summary and a description of the contents.

Successively commanded by Lawrence O’Bryan Branch (until his death at the Battle of Antietam) and James H. Lane, the brigade and its North Carolina regiments served with the Army of Northern Virginia for the length of its existence.

The history is laid out in chronological order, starting with a biography of Branch and the formation of the brigade, then from the Battle of Hanover’s Court House through Appomattox, with stops along the way for chapters on Medical Care, Daily Camp Life, the Plight of the Prisoner, and Crime and Punishment. A closing chapter and epilogue look at the brigade in memory and its Place in History.

You get:

  • 373 pages of text in 18 chapters and the epilogue.
  • A 14 page bibliography with substantial manuscript and newspaper sources.
  • A somewhat brief 7 page index.
  • 10 Hal Jesperson maps
  • Dozens of images, both portraiture and modern, as well as engravings.
  • Savas Beatie staple bottom of page footnotes.