Pvt. Ezra Greene, Co. H, 2nd Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry, On the Campaign

27 11 2017

Headquarters 2nd Regmt RIV Augst 4

Dear Granny,

I have a few leisure moments which I feel disposed to spend in writing a short sketch of our battle at Bull Run on Sunday July 21st. We left our camp July the 15th. Where we was going we knew not but we expected some fighting and we found it to be as soldiers said the hardest battle ever fought in America. The 2nd R. I. Regiment was in the engagement 4½ hrs and it was hot work all the time. We marched 9 miles the first day, slept on the ground, satisfied at that. Aroused at 4 1/2 marched 9 more miles to what is called Fair Fax Court House where we arrived at noon where we stopped until the next morning. We started and marched 3 miles and halted till 4 1/2 on account of a battle being fought 2 miles beyond by our cavalry. Then we marched 4 miles and halted for the night. Aroused at 6, marched into closer quarters, pitched our tents of rails and brush, where we slept one night with comfort. Next night which was Saturday night we had orders to march at 2 o’clock a.m. Was aroused at 1 and ordered into the line of battle without food or half enough sleep. We marched about 15 miles to what is called Bull’s run or OW Bloody run where the battle was at its hight. It was then 10½. We made a furious charge without fear of the consequences. We kept at our work and hot it was until 3 o’clock then we was forced to retreat but I did not leave the field until the regiment was about 3 miles ahead. After the regiment went out into the woods and halted to rest I went back through the field to where Peleg Card lay wounded. The shots flew thick and fast around me then. Peleg lived about 1 hour. I then lay down and slept 3/4 of an hour. While I lay there, a cannon shot struck within a few feet of me. It was then 5 o’clock. The reg’t was gone an hour and the enemy’s cavalry was close behind me. I was alone. I seized a rifle and 25 cartridges and started, intending to fight if I must. A great many threw their guns away but I brought home, tired and footsore. All we had to eat was hard bread and no sleep for 38 hours. A soldier’s life is a hard life and a lousy one. Our work is hard or else we have none at all. It is like being in state prison for we cannot leave the ground and have to do as the officers say and when they please.

From your affectionate grandson, — Ezra Greene

Camp Sprague,

Co. H, 2nd Regmt RIV

Washington

D. C.

Letter from the collection of Dr. Richard Weiner. Transcription (with some editorial notes) biographical data, and letter images can be found at Spared & Shared. Transcription used with permission of Spared & Shared.

Hat-tip to reader John Banks

Ezra Greene at Fold3

Ezra Greene at Ancestry

Ezra Greene at FindAGrave

Co. H, 2nd Rhode Island Volunteers roster

Interesting information on Ezra Greene’s house


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27 11 2017

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