Fairfax County’s Sesqui

19 01 2011

The good folks at Farifax County (separated from Prince William County by Bull Run) sent me some info regarding the observance of the Sesquicentennial there.

Just as it is today, Fairfax County, Virginia, was a strategic hub of activity throughout the Capital Region during the Civil War. The County will once again serve as the crossroads to history as the region plays host to myriad of commemorative events and special exhibits marking the Sesquicentennial, or 150th anniversary, of the Civil War beginning in Spring 2011.

Visit Fairfax, the official tourism organization for Fairfax County, Virginia, welcomes the world to stay with us for this momentous occasion. Centrally located in the region and literally on the border of Bull Run and Manassas National Battlefield Park, Fairfax County is the ideal base camp from which you can easily get to historic battlefields and attractions, the majesty of downtown Washington, DC, as well as modern luxuries, like award-winning restaurants, shopping and the Virginia wine country.

We invite you to visit our dedicated Civil War site and follow all our Civil War movements online through Facebook and on Twitter (@fairfaxcivilwar). Also be sure to sign up for our monthly Civil War newsletter that highlights the rich heritage of Fairfax County, VA and the region.

You and your Bull Runnings readers might also be interested in downloading the educational brochure we created. Contact Patrick Lennon (plennon@fxva.com) to order complimentary hard copies of the brochure.

Members of the media may contact either Sarah Maciejewski of Visit Fairfax or Melissa Gold of White+Partners PR for interviews, content or related images (contact information is listed below).

We look forward to commemorating the rich Civil War history of Fairfax County, Virginia, and the surrounding Capital Region with you over the next several years.

Best regards,





2011 Manassas and PWC Sesqui Activities

4 01 2011

Here’s an article with a calendar of sesquicentennial events in Virginia in 2011.  Below are events scheduled for Manassas and Prince William County in the first quarter:

  • Manassas Museum: “Mosby in Manassas and Prince William.” Lecture. 2 p.m. Jan. 16. Free. 9101 Prince William St., Manassas. Info: 703-368-1873, or www.manassasmuseum.org.
  • Manassas Blue and Gray Ball: Civil War food, music and dancing. Jan. 22, Hylton Performing Arts Center, 10900 University Blvd., Manassas. $150 per person. Info: 703-361-6599 ext. 102.
  • Old Manassas Courthouse: “There Stands Jackson: The Life and Times of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson.” Lecture. 7 p.m. Jan. 27. Free. 9248 Lee Ave., Manassas. Info: 703-367-7872.
  • Manassas Museum: “Back of the Big House and the Planters Project.” Lecture on slave life during the Civil War. 2 p.m. Feb. 6. Free. 9101 Prince William St., Manassas. Info: 703-368-1873 or www.manassasmuseum.org.
  • Liberia Mansion: “A Slave’s Life at Liberia Plantation.” Living history, music and stories at the Liberia Mansion, 8601 Portner Ave., Manassas. 2 p.m. Feb. 12. $15. Info: 703-368-1873.
  • Old Manassas Courthouse: “Plantation Culture from Those Who Built It: A View of Slavery through Architecture and Art.” Lecture. 7 p.m. Feb. 24. Free. 9248 Lee Ave, Manassas. Info: 703-367-7872.
  • Liberia Plantation: Dinner with General P.G.T. Beauregard. March 19. $25. 8601 Portner Ave., Manassas. Info and registration: 703-368-1873.
  • Manassas Museum: “Manassas: Legends and Lies.” Lecture by John Hennessy. Book signing follows. 2 p.m. March 27 Free. 9101 Prince William St., Manassas. Info: 703-368-1873 or www.manassasmuseum.org.
  • Old Manassas Courthouse: “They Fought Like Demons: Female Combatants in the Civil War.” Lecture. 7 p.m. March 21 Free. 9248 Lee Ave, Manassas. Info: 703-367-7872.

The March 21 lecture may be presented by Elizabeth Leonard, who gave Bull Runnings an interview recently.

If any of you have any more information on these events, let me know in the comments section!





1911 Peace Jubilee to be Reenacted

3 01 2011

Here and here are a couple of articles on the reenactment of the July 21, 1911 Peace Jubilee to be held on its 100th anniversary in Manassas as part of Prince William County’s Civil War Sesquicentennial observation.  The above is an image of President Taft opening the jubilee, on the steps of the same courthouse in Old Town Manassas where the reenactment will take place.





A New Year, a Stamp, and a Milestone

31 12 2010

First, Happy New Year to all my readers and Facebook fans.  Here’s hoping 2011 will be as good as or better than its predecessors.

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Second, the U. S, Postal Service has announced it will be releasing Civil War themed stamps in each year of the sesquicentennial (see here).  The first two stamps will commemorate 1861 events, the bombing of Ft. Sumter and the Battle of First Bull Run.  I could only find this small image of the Bull Run stamp, but it is a copy of the painting that hangs on the wall of the Manassas Visitor Center, The Capture of Ricketts’ Battery, painted for the NPS in 1964 by Sydney E. King.  Here’s a nice big image of the painting (click for a larger version):

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Third and last, this is the 1,000th post on Bull Runnings – thanks for stopping by!





Daily Show Looks at Sesqui “Celebrations” in the South

10 12 2010

Pretty funny bit on The Daily Show about how some folks plan to “celebrate” the Sesquicentennial.  I can’t figure out how to embed this video, so I’ll just link to Kevin’s blog which is where I saw it first.  Funny stuff on many levels, but there’s a funny Bull Run tie-in too.

At the beginning of the bit are clips of a Sons of Confederate Veterans promo.  Notice that as the words “men and women of the south” went off to fight for liberty against overwhelming odds (or words to that effect, but definitely the part in quotes) are spoken a photograph of a West Point cadet is shown.  This cadet is undoubtedly Henry Walter Kingsbury (left), who served on the staff of Irvin McDowell at First Bull Run and was mortally wounded at the head of the 11th Connecticut a little over a year later at Antietam.  So much for setting the record straight.

Read more on Kingsbury here, here and here.





New York Times Sesquicentennial Blog

26 11 2010

The New York Times has set up a blog of sorts that will continue throughout the Sesquicentennial.  Disunion “revisits and reconsiders America’s most perilous period — using contemporary accounts, diaries, images and historical assessments to follow the Civil War as it unfolded.”  You can also follow Disunion on Facebook.  Authors are varied, though currently dominated by one Adam Goodheart who has this book on 1861 coming out soon.





Wa-Po Again

19 11 2010

So it would seem that the cavalcade of commentators at Wa-Po is a continuing enterprise.  Civil War Times editor Dana Shoaf has weighed-in on the Sesquicentennial today.  Perhaps my irritation at one expert’s repeated use of the word “must” spilled over into the tenor of my posts regarding this series (they keep using the word “blog”, but I do not think it means what they think it means).








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