Original Bartow Monument Then & Now

9 07 2014

For more on the Bartow monuments, see here.





The Bartow Monument

29 05 2014

I can’t recall that I’ve posted anything much on this item here before. On Henry Hill there is a monument to Colonel (identified as General on the plaque) Francis Bartow. Here it is:

Bartow Monument, Henry Hill, MNBP

Bartow Monument, Henry Hill, MNBP

Shortly after the battle, and long before the installation of the above, there was constructed the first monument on the field, to the same martyred Colonel Bartow:

Original Bartow Monument

Original Bartow Monument

Sometime after the Confederate withdrawal from the Manassas line in 1862, the monument disappeared, perhaps courtesy of souvenir-seeking or vindictive Yankee soldiers. Well, it mostly disappeared. Very near the current monument, in a cluster of tree-trunks, you can see its last vestiges:

Location of cluster of tree trunks relative to the current Bartow monument

Location of cluster of tree trunks relative to the current Bartow monument

Original Bartow Monument

Original Bartow Monument

Original Bartow Monument

Original Bartow Monument

Be sure to check it out next time you’re on the field.





Bee Monument, ca 1939

29 05 2014





The Stovall Monument

5 04 2014

For more on the Stovall monument here. And even more coming eventually, including a familial connection to a fella on the other side.





Stone Bridge with Monument

31 10 2013





Battle Monument Then & Now

29 09 2013





Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

7 02 2012

The setting at the foot of Capitol Hill is magnificent. Up close, the triptych in memory of U. S. Grant (the mounted sculpture of him alone is the second largest equestrian statue in the world) is massive, but set in Union Square between the Capitol and the reflecting pool it shrinks and is strangely isolated – not the impression intended by the Senate Park Commission’s 1902 plan. Sculpted by Henry Merwin Shrady and dedicated in 1922 (the same year as the Lincoln Memorial on the opposite end of the Mall), the bronze work consists of Grant and two tableaux depicting artillery and cavalry, 13 horses in all. It is recognized as the world’s preeminent equestrian sculpture.

You can spend days photographing it.

The content is stark. Not so much symbolism, as in the Meade Memorial, so not much interpretation is needed. War is men and equipment and movement. Movement, terror, and tension abound in the faces and bodies of the animals, troopers and artillerists as they move quickly, desperately, to some unnamed point. And amidst – in fact, above – all the action sits the steady, determined figure of Grant. While the movement is toward the general, his gaze is inexorably fixed on a far off, larger objective. There’s a whole lot to see, but to see all one need do is look. You don’t need a weather vane to know which way the wind blows.

For more on the story of the memorial, I once again refer you to Testament to Union: Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC, by K. A. Jacob. Below are some shots I took, unfortunately in low resolution, back in June 2011. Here are a few of the longer shots – click on the thumbs for larger images:

     

Next, the central figure:

            

Now let’s take a look at the “left” group (when facing the front of the monument), the Cavalry. I can only suspect that cavalry made a more interesting artistic subject than infantry, given the minimal contribution of the former arm to the outcome of the war – there, the bait is set:

     

And last, the King of Battle:

        

A must see for anyone visiting the capital. Well worth minor pedestrian/car traffic inconvenience.





George Meade Memorial, Washington, DC

1 02 2012

Back in June 2011, I had a chance to do a little sight-seeing in our nation’s capital. While on my way to the Capitol, I came across the memorial to Major General George Gordon Meade between 3rd & 4th Sts. NW on Pennsylvania Ave. OK, I didn’t just happen upon it, I was seeking it out. Meade is a favorite of mine – I think he gets the short end of the stick, memory-wise. But his statue is as glorious as it is touching (click for a larger image):

Here’s the message in the pavement:

There was a trio of young adults from somewhere south of the border who asked me to take their photo in front of the statue. I suspect they just thought it was a cool sculpture – and it is – but who knows? Maybe they knew exactly who Meade was.

Testament to Union: Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC, by K. A. Jacob is a wonderfully written and illustrated book that I highly recommend for anyone touring the city. It tells me that the Meade memorial was sculpted by Charles Grafly out of marble and was dedicated in 1927, after 12 years of bickering over the design. Meade and seven other figures circle the memorial. Loyalty and Chivalry lift the mantle of war from Meade’s shoulders, “as he strides confidently toward the future.” In the rear of the memorial, which I did not photograph for some reason which I photographed 7/22/2013, the winged figure of War stands with his back to the General, glaring into the past. You can see the wings framing the symbol of the Army of the Potomac above Meade’s head in my photo. Making up the rest of the total of eight figures are Energy, Fame, Progress and Military Courage. War strikes a less imposing figure now than he did in 1927: his smallish nose is a replacement for a more brutal one that broke off years ago.

557652_10200467468391515_2137418982_n

Meade was originally installed in front of and to the north of the massive U. S. Grant memorial at the base of the Capitol. In 1969, it was dismantled to allow for construction under the mall, and was stored away for 14 years before being reassembled in 1983 in its current location to the northwest. Ms. Jacob describes the significance of the new site’s perspective:

Meade looks out onto Pennsylvania Avenue to the spot that marked one of his proudest days. At nine o’clock on the morning of May 23, 1865, Meade rode down the avenue on his garlanded horse at the head of the Army of the Potomac as the leader of the Grand Review of troops. As he passed, the enormous throng picked up the chant of the Pennsylvanians in the crowd, “Gettysburg, Gettysburg, Gettysburg!”





Manassas National Battlefield Park Photos May 2009

19 06 2009

These images were recorded on May 29-30, 2009; for the most part in the company of fellow blogger Craig Swain.  Click on the thumbs for larger images.

 01---Brownell01a---Ricketts

Visitor’s Center (VC) displays of Francis Brownell’s musket and 11th NY uniform worn at the occupation of Alexandria; Capt. James B. Ricketts’s sword and sash worn at First Bull Run.

 03---Bartow02---Bartow04---Bartow05-Bartow

Francis Bartow monument on the Henry Hill Trail; trees marking the site of the base to an earlier monument to Bartow erected in September 1861; two images of the base.

07---Henry-House06---Henry-Grave08---Matthews-Hill-From-Hen

The Henry House; Judith Henry grave; view north to Matthews Hill from the Henry House.

10---Ricketts11---Ramsey-Marker12---7th-GA13---7th-GA14---Ricketts

View south along Ricketts’ line toward VC; site of death of Lt. Ramsey of Ricketts’ Battery; two images of 7th GA marker near Ricketts’ guns; view north along Ricketts’ line toward Matthews Hill.

15---Signal-Hill16---Signal-Hill

Two views of the monument at Signal Hill in Manassas, marking the position of E. P. Alexander’s signal station.  The earthworks to the rear of the monument are off limits.

19---Path-to-Mayfield-Fort20---Mayfield-Fort

Entry to the path leading to Mayfield Fort in Manassas, part of Beauregard’s system of defensive earthworks; Mayfield Fort.

21---Blackburn's-Ford22---Blackburn's-Ford23---Blackburn's-Ford24---Blackburn's-Ford

Parking lot on north side of Blackburn’s Ford; three views from north to south side of ford, panning to west.

25---Cub-Run26---Cub-Run28---Cub-Run27---Cub-Run

View west along Warrenton Pike (Lee Highway) toward Cub Run (new bridge is lighter pavement); view west to run; view east to run; view of run from the west.

29---Reynolds30---Reynolds

View south from Reynolds’ RI Battery on Mattews Hill south to Henry Hill; view east along Reynolds’ line.

31--Stovall32---Stovall33---Stovall

View east along Stone Bridge Trail toward the monument Private George T. Stovall of the 8th GA; two views of the marker.

34---Carter-Cemetery35---Carter-Cemetery

Two views of the Carter Family Cemetery on the Stone Bridge Trail, both looking south.

36---Farm-Ford

Area marked as Farm Ford on Bull Run, where the brigades fo Sherman and Keyes crossed.  NPS Ranger Jim Burgess believes the actual ford lies about 200 yards upstream from here.

37---Imboden38---Imboden-to-Dogan

View north to Matthews Hill from Imboden’s position on Henry Hill, Reynolds’ guns in the distance; view northwest to Dogan’s Ridge from Imboden’s position, Dogan House in the distance.

40---Entry-to-Sudley-Rd-Tra39---Sudley-Rd-Trace41---Sudley-Rd-Trace

Entrance to original Sudley Road trace near the VC, looking south with Sudley Rd to the right; the trace looking north to the VC; the trace looking south.

42---Stone-House46---Stone-House44---Stone-House45---Stone-House

The Stone House at the intersection of the Sudley-Manassas Rd and the Warrenton Pike – view north from the Pike; view southwest from the rear of the house; two interior images.

47---Buck-Hill48---Buck-Hill49---Buck-Hill

Buck Hill to the north of the Stone House – view south to Henry Hill; view north to Matthews Hill; view east toward the Stone Bridge.

52---Chinn-Ridge

Chinn Ridge looking north – the area of the repulse of Col. O. O. Howard’s brigade.

50---Thornberry51---Thornberry

The Thornberry House near Sudley Springs – Union soldiers took shelter in this house (much changed from the original) after the battle.





Matthews Hill Trail and a Bonus

15 07 2008

Craig over at To the Sound of the Guns has posted a great photo tour of the Matthews Hill Trail at Manassas Battlefield Park.  Check it out.  Thanks, Craig, for all the fine work you do.  But as often happens with thread pulling, this three sentence post has turned into something different.  (Follow the links please; this ain’t yer gandpa’s blog.)

Craig’s photo essay includes a shot of the George T. Stovall monument (see below, courtesy of Craig – notice that WordPress has prettied up our photos, but they’ve added some glitches to the image posting process).  I found this interesting tidbit, which sheds some light on how life continued on for those left behind.  George’s sister Louisa petitioned the court to appoint her husband trustee of railroad stock and four slaves in the wake of the death of the former trustee (George) and of her father who had originally bequeathed the duty to George.  It’s most interesting I think in light of the fact that the petition was granted on May 4, 1865!  Remember that Jefferson Davis was not captured until six days later, on May 10, near Irwinville, GA.  At least until then, it appears to have been business as usual in the courts of Georgia.

George T. Stovall Marker Detail

George T. Stovall Marker Detail

 

 








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