“The History Guys” Podcast

12 04 2011

The American History Guys are three university professors who specialize on 18th, 19th, and 20th century American history. You’ll be most familiar with the 19th century guy, Ed Ayers of the University of Richmond. The others are University of Virginia instructors Peter Onuf (18th century) and Brian Balogh (20th century). I received an email from an intern at the show – Miriam – about a series of podcasts on the civil war. There are three in the series (The Road to the Civil War, Why They Fought, and The Civil War at 150: Questions Remain) and you can check them out here.





The Essential Civil War Curriculum

21 03 2011

A little bird in the form of Donald Stoker passed along this link to a new Virginia Tech website put together by James “Bud” Robertson, William “Jack” Davis and J. L. D. “Laurie” Woodruff, The Essential Civil War Curriculum. From the site:

Peer reviewed by today’s foremost Civil War historians, the Essential Civil War Curriculum contains essays, bibliographies and other resources on the 400+ topics which constitute the basic knowledge that should be possessed by any serious student of the Civil War.

One of the tasks for the site is to attract historians (in their eyes, this includes professional historians, PhD students, and competent amateur historians – so this could mean you!) to contribute essays on topics not yet completed. Links in the upper right hand corner of the main page of the site will take you to the completed essays and also provide you with information on essay submissions.

It looks like an ambitious project, and I’m adding it to the recommended links here.





OK, We’re Tweeting

25 02 2011

To paraphrase Bob Wiley:

Dr. Marvin! Dr. Marvin! Guess What? I Tweet! I’m a Tweeter! I Tweet!

Yep, I’m giving it a shot.  Follow us at @Bullrunnings.





National Tribune Online!

29 01 2011

Thanks to Brett Schulte (one link for each name) for sending the welcome news that the National Tribune is now available online here.  This is outstanding news to me, though as Brett explains there are some issues with searchability.

The National Tribune was a publication for Union veterans of the Civil War.  Think Confederate Veteran for the good guys.  It published first as a monthly, then as a weekly from, 1877 to 1917.  It featured current news of interest to vets, but also had contributions from readers recounting the glory days.  Columns like Fighting Them Over featured back and forth between veterans with often wildly conflicting recollections of events.

Now all we need is a good, searchable text version.  But hey, this is a start.  Hopefully I’ll have the patience to start going through and picking out the Bull Run stuff.  If any of you readers has an index, that would make things much easier for me…

UPDATE: A reader notes that there are issues missing and this is not a complete run – but it’s more than we’ve had.





Bory at West Point

26 01 2011

The New York Times blog Opinionator on P. G. T. Beauregard as USMA superintendent, A Short Stay – and a Long JumpCheck it out.





A List With My Name On It

21 01 2011

OK – Bull Runnings is on another “top” list for Civil War blogs.  I don’t mean to be cavalier about these things, but I’m not sure why I’m on this or any other list – I don’t know the methodologies behind the selections or the motivations of the selectors.  But they have at least taken the time to compile the list, and I should at least take the time to acknowledge it.  There were a few blogs I expected to see on the list and saw,  a few I expected to see and didn’t see, and a few I didn’t expect to see and saw. But check it out – you may be turned on to something you didn’t know about.





Warfare in the Age of Steam

16 01 2011

I’m currently reading Crimea by Trevor Royle.  I have limited knowledge of the 1854-1856 war and, recognizing the limitations of a comprehensive study such as this, am learning a lot, not the least of which being that many of what I’ve always heard were “firsts” in our Civil War were, at best, seconds.  Not that Royle points these things out: while the United States does play a role in his history of the war, he doesn’t draw comparisons between the two conflicts.

I thought this would be a good time to point you towards a blog I’ve been following for a while, Warfare in the Age of Steam.  Run by someone named Ralphus, it puts the Civil War into a larger context, though that’s not its specific focus.  Lots of cool stuff – Ralphus uses a variety of media including plenty of video clips, and he has a penchant for Zouaves, art, film, and miniatures.  But he’s looking at the world in general during the period.  Check it out.  I’ve added it to the blogroll and it will show up on the page when next I update.





Great, But Not Good

7 01 2011

Check out this thoughtful “teaser” essay by Keith Harris of Cosmic America about the pluses and a pretty big minus of David Blight’s seminal Civil War memory study Race and Reunion.  Hat tip to Kevin Levin for pointing this out.

I’ve added Keith to the blogroll – he’ll show up next time I update the page.  He has some great stuff up and uses some unique angles of approach, so check it out.  I like his style – sort of the Anthony Bourdain of the Civil War blogosphere.





LISTEN TO ME!!!!

7 01 2011

Liza and Jerry flank the clown that is Bull Runnings

Here’s an interesting post on how un-or-less-established individuals in the Civil War history game can get their voices heard and maybe even become a player.  It’s important to have a handle on who your target audience is, though that may change over time.  But there’s really nothing stopping anyone from being heard.  Getting folks to listen is the key, and entirely dependent upon you.





Dana Shoaf on the Confederate Soldier

2 01 2011

Here’s Civil War Times editor Dana Shoaf on the Confederate Soldier:

See here.








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