Great News – and Coming Up…

1 01 2011

The great news is that I received a communique from the Godfather of battle digitization, Brian Downey, and he plans to be active on his blog again this year (work commitments kept him away for most of 2010).  To show he is in earnest, he has a new post up at Behind Antietam on the Web.  Welcome back, Brian!

Things I’m working on for the next few posts:

  • an interview with a Gettysburg entrepreneur;
  • a preview/review of the January 10 American Experience program on U. S. Grant;
  • a preview of the new issue of America’s Civil War magazine;
  • a couple of items of interest from the new issue of North and South magazine;
  • an expansion on my article on Gettysburg’s Jacob Weikert farm in the current issue of Civil War Times magazine;
  • another way to follow Bull Runnings using an e-Reader (that is what they call those things, right?);
  • and something I’ve been putting off for a long while, a look at an essay that discusses expectations at the time that the great military leader of the Civil War would emerge from a place other than the military establishment.

As usual, other things are sure to come up, including more primary material on First Bull Run and various news items, so stay tuned!





Why Bory Wanted that Flag

21 12 2010

Stuart Salling over at Louisiana in the Civil War has this interesting article on what compelled P. G. T. Beauregard to adopt the Rebel battle flag.  Check it out.  I’ll try to find the original Richmond Daily Dispatch article and put it in the resources section.

Photo courtesy of Craig Swain.





Blogroll Update

8 12 2010

I’ve updated the blogroll once again.  There are a number of additions, some of them are new and some of them have been around for a little while.  Check it out, mostly good stuff there.  If you know of any sites not listed, let me know.  I’ll check them out and if in my magnanimity I deem them worthy, I’ll add them next time around.





Winfield Scott’s “Operational Art”

2 12 2010

Dmitri Rotov has this interesting series going on Winfield Scott that looks at what Dmitri calls Scott’s “first two offensives” from a slightly different angle.  Check it out.





Live Blogging with Cenantua

2 10 2010

Robert Moore recently experimented with live blogging along the C&O Canal.  Pretty cool stuff.  Start the journey here.





13th Mississippi at First Bull Run

13 08 2010

Dick Stanley has a few posts up on his 13th Mississippi Infantry Regiment blog about that unit and First Bull Run.  Check them out here.





New Blog – Gettysburg Civil War Institute

13 08 2010

There’s another blog in the hot tub, this one from the Gettysburg College Civil War Institute.  Check out Civil War Institute.  OK, maybe this first post is pandering a bit – a version of that wink-wink nudge-nudge McClellan remark that some NPS rangers and other guides throw out there when they feel like they’re losing the crowd.  But I can’t blame them for putting up an attention grabber: it’s a very crowded hot tub, after all!

I’m not sure who will be contributing posts to this blog, but imagine it will be a team of folks headed up by Institute Director Peter Carmichael.  So my expectations are high.





Blogroll Updates

30 07 2010

Please take some time to check out the Blogroll.  I’ve made quite a few additions, including some I haven’t mentioned before:

Also check out Irish in the American Civil War, hosted by Daiman Shiels, an Irishman who specializes in battlefield archaeology





Lint In My Pocket – Artillery On the Ridge

27 07 2010

Lint In My Pocket – Artillery On the Ridge is a blog maintained by Scott Summers, a poet and teacher in New Jersey.  Here’s how he recently described what he’s doing:

Originally, The Lint in My Pocket was meant to represent the small things that peter from my mind; however, I now see something different. I see the lint that lined the pockets of American Civil War soldiers, generals, colonels, civilians, etc. Like me, each of them carried lint in his/her pocket as well. Each of them was normal folk, as I am. Yet, these normal folk were thrust into incredible situations, situations laced with triumph, tragedy, love, hate, blood, breath, and death; they were forced to experience, in one way or another, the artillery on the ridge.

So, I press on. Hope you enjoy.

Last week, Scott posted this poem for the anniversary of the First Battle of Bull Run:

Stonewall Jackson at Manassas: July 21, 1861

That beard hangs
from his chin
like an anvil.

Ain’t no lie.
Yankee bullets
veer `round his head

so not to smack
against his face.
We should just point

him toward Washington
and shackle up behind
like a chain of geese.

I swear we’d rename
this country Virginia
before it’s cold enough

to tighten your skin
and freeze your breath.

Enjoying!





Wheat’s Battalion

24 07 2010

Stuart Salling hosts the blog Louisiana in the Civil War, and also wrote the recently published Louisianians in the Western Confederacy – the Adams-Gibson Brigade in the Civil War.  A contributor to his site posted this article, about the Battalion from formation through First Bull Run.   Check it out.








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