Manassas Book Project

7 02 2011

No, not one of mine.  Blogger John Cummings (Spotsylvania Civil War Blog) hopes to have a new book on the Manassas battlefields published in time for the 150th anniversary of First Bull Run, and he talks about it here.  Check it out.





Was AL More Like GBM Than HUG?

27 01 2011

The recent flood of posts on various blogs resulting from the Lowry controversy has been fascinating.  Now there’s one out there that’s tangential but tantalizing – tangentializing?  Check out Dmitri’s riff on Crossroads’ retort to Opinionator’s opinion.  It’s a shame that Dmitri doesn’t allow comments (that’s his right, of course), but if you want to express your thoughts – recognizing they be thoughts on the post and not knee-jerk reactions to the poster and whatever you suspect his motivations to be – feel free to comment away!  I know this is supposed to be my blog, and you may think it inappropriate for me to entertain a discussion of another blogger’s post, but hell, it IS my blog and I can do whatever I want, so there.





Bory at West Point

26 01 2011

The New York Times blog Opinionator on P. G. T. Beauregard as USMA superintendent, A Short Stay – and a Long JumpCheck it out.





Patrick Clooney of Co. K, 69th NYSM

23 01 2011

Is the man seated on the left Patrick Clooney? Photo from LOC

Brian Downey has posted a biographical sketch of a member of Thomas Francis Meagher’s company of the 69th New York State Militia.  Check it out.





Seminar on the War in 1861 and a Podcast Blog

23 01 2011

Thanks to Craig Swain for bringing this to my attention.  The Appomattox Court House National Historical Site announced that a seminar will be held at Longwood University in Farmville, VA on Saturday, February 26, 2011, The War Begins, 1861.  There are two lectures on First Bull Run that look interesting (I’m not implying that the other lectures are less than interesting by any means).  Here’s the schedule:

Jarman Auditorium at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia.

Schedule

9:00 a.m. Doors Open
9:25 a.m. Introduction by Dr. David Coles, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of History, Political Science, and Philosophy, Longwood University
9:30 a.m. David Ruth, The Nation Crosses the Rubicon: Fort Sumter 1861.
10:30 a.m. John Hennessy, First Manassas: Legends, Lies, and Misunderstandings.
11:30 a.m. Patrick Schroeder, The Fire Zouaves at Bull Run: Heroes or Humbugs?
12:30 p.m. Lunch
1:45 p.m. Jeffery Wert, “‘He Stood out from the Great War Canvas': Jeb Stuart.”
2:45 p.m. Mike Gorman, Richmond Again Taken: Images of the Confederate Capital.

No reservations necessary. Signs will be posted on the Longwood University campus. For directions to the campus go to www.Longwood.edu.

For more information contact Dr. David Coles at 434-395-2220 or Patrick Schroeder at 434-352-8987 ext. 32.

Longwood also has a podcast blog at That a Nation Might Live.  It’s a little confusing – you have to click-through on each post to find a link to the podcast, usually located underneath an illustration.  Check it out.





A List With My Name On It

21 01 2011

OK – Bull Runnings is on another “top” list for Civil War blogs.  I don’t mean to be cavalier about these things, but I’m not sure why I’m on this or any other list – I don’t know the methodologies behind the selections or the motivations of the selectors.  But they have at least taken the time to compile the list, and I should at least take the time to acknowledge it.  There were a few blogs I expected to see on the list and saw,  a few I expected to see and didn’t see, and a few I didn’t expect to see and saw. But check it out – you may be turned on to something you didn’t know about.





Warfare in the Age of Steam

16 01 2011

I’m currently reading Crimea by Trevor Royle.  I have limited knowledge of the 1854-1856 war and, recognizing the limitations of a comprehensive study such as this, am learning a lot, not the least of which being that many of what I’ve always heard were “firsts” in our Civil War were, at best, seconds.  Not that Royle points these things out: while the United States does play a role in his history of the war, he doesn’t draw comparisons between the two conflicts.

I thought this would be a good time to point you towards a blog I’ve been following for a while, Warfare in the Age of Steam.  Run by someone named Ralphus, it puts the Civil War into a larger context, though that’s not its specific focus.  Lots of cool stuff – Ralphus uses a variety of media including plenty of video clips, and he has a penchant for Zouaves, art, film, and miniatures.  But he’s looking at the world in general during the period.  Check it out.  I’ve added it to the blogroll and it will show up on the page when next I update.








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