Housekeeping

26 01 2009

OK, a couple of things.  For one, I have another very long letter from T. J. Goree saved in my drafts.  Problem is, for some reason my visual editor is making a whole bunch of words run together every time I hit spell check or save.  I sent WordPress an email, but they haven’t responded, and I want to leave it there so they can see what I’m talking about.  Every time I have a problem it’s the first time they’ve seen it, despite the fact that there are millions of WordPress blogs.

Also, I’ve finished proofing a manuscript for an upcoming book on First Bull Run.  It was quite a learning experience on several levels, and I’m thankful to the publisher and author for the opportunity to contribute to the project.

I’ve determined that my recent purchase of the new two volume Lincoln biography by Michael Burlingame will be my last Lincoln purchase for a long while, unless I find something I just can’t pass up.  I’m creeping up on 200 AL books (if I haven’t topped it already), and that’s just inexcusable.

I’m still creeping along with the McDougall book Throes of Democracy.  It’s pretty good, but there’s a lot of stuff in there so it’s taking me awhile (I’m around 275 pages in with 335 to go).  After that, I think I’m going to do Vol. II of Freehling’s The Road to Disunion and then Burton’s The Age of Lincoln.  I need a better understanding of antebellum America.  I may throw some lighter reading in there as well.  All work and no play make Jack a dull boy.    I’m thinking of Heroes & Cowards – it may dovetail with a post I’m working on concerning Southern criticism of the character of Southern men.

My Six-Pack column for May’s America’s Civil War has been submitted, and I’ve seen a draft of the layout including the new graphics.  Interesting.

There is a possibility that I may be doing a tour of the First Bull Run battlefield this summer.  While I’ve participated in and even organized multi-day tours before, I’ve never actually conducted one.  I have turned down requests to do them, but I think now it’s time to bite the bullet if I get the chance.

Oh yeah: I’m all done posting the Bull Run OR’s from the Supplement.  Thanks again to Jonathan Soffe for sending those to me.  I wonder how long I should wait before asking him if he can send me the correspondence?





Wheat’s Report

7 01 2009

Well, I finally found a copy or Major C. R. Wheat’s report of the actions of the 1st Special Louisiana Battalion at Bull Run.  It was hiding in plain sight in the Supplement to the ORs, and was sent to me by friend of Bull Runnings Jonathan Soffe.

As discussed in this post, the report of Wheat’s commander N. G. Evans claims that the Battalion captured a regimental color during the fight.  Wheat’s report unfortunately does not mention any captured banner, however he does make mention of the capture of some artillery pieces.  Is it possible that the captured colors in question were actually those of a battery?

Also, I have more on the Wheat ambrotype recently “discovered” by Mike Musick and discussed here and here.  Mike sent me a big packet of info, which I mentioned here.  I haven’t forgotten – I just haven’t had time to get to it yet.





Imboden’s Report

1 01 2009

imbodenIf you read my post on Imboden’s Report prior to about 2:30 PM on Jan. 1, you will notice that it looks a little different now.  Prompted by a question from Craig, I took a look at another source for the report.  The original post was taken from the Supplement to the Official Records, a copy of which was provided me by Jonathan Soffe.  Correspondence with Jim Burgess at Manassas NBP revealed that Imboden’s report is also published in the second volume of The Rebellion Record, which I have here in my office.  That publication showed that there are some differences between it and the version of the report published in the Charleston Daily Courier which served as the basis for the report in the Supplement.  Those differences included punctuation and paragraphs, as well as variation in text and the inclusion of a large portion of text missing from the Supplement.  So I have replaced my earlier post with the report as it appears in the Rebellion Record.  Read it again as I think it is significantly different.

The report prompted me to send a note to Jim with regards to the single gun which Imboden identified as belonging to the 4th Alabama.  Since I’d never seen reference to the Alabamians having their own cannon before, I turned to Jim for clarification.  His response confirmed my suspicions:

Imboden’s report is also published in The Rebellion Record (Vol. 2, p.43).  We have always interpreted Imboden’sreference to the gun with the 4th Alabama as actually being Lt. Clarke Leftwich’s piece from the Lynchburg Artillery (Latham’s Battery).   This was one of the two guns assigned to Evans’ brigade, Lt. George Davidson commanding the other 6-pounder of the section near the entrance to Robinson’s Lane.    Imboden’s reference to the horses running off with the limber for the gun in question appears remarkably similar to what Leftwich experienced.   In a letter published in the Richmond Enquirer, Aug. 6, 1861, Leftwich takes issue with Imboden’s published report and states that it was the horses for his caisson that took flight from the yard of the Stone House.   He further states, “As to the Alabama Regiment crossing to the north side of the Warrenton road…with our gun, that, too, is incorrect.   Our two six-pounders were brought from the Stone Bridge directly to the scene of action… unattended by the Alabama regiment or a single individual except those commanding and manning the guns…. No gun or piece of artillery took position between the Staunton battery and the enemy, or with the Alabama regiment at any portion of the fight, except our two six-pounders.  Nor was any piece north of the Warrenton road except ours, during the engagement.”

Happy New Year’s Eve!

Jim Burgess

Next up – get a copy of Leftwich’s letter!

Imboden photo from www.generalsandbrevets.com





More Official Reports

22 12 2008

suppToday I received in the mail a most welcome care package from e-quaintance Jonathan Soffe of  the UK and www.firstbullrun.com.  Jon was kind enough to send me the Bull Run reports from the Supplement to the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, only one of which I had.  These include reports from Rob Wheat of the 1st Special Louisiana Battalion and Thomas Goldsby of the 4th Alabama Infantry.  I’ll be transcribing  and posting these reports over the next few weeks.

Thanks Jon!





Cool Stuff Coming Up

3 12 2008

A few neat developments here at Bull Runnings.  With the help of friends Robert Moore and Jonathan Soffe, I think we’ve ironed out some problems with the CSA and CSA artillery OOBs.  According to Jim Burgess at the Battlefield, one of these is a problem which has persisted at least since 1947!  At the same time I think we’ve solved a related problem in the Bull Run bible, R. M. Johnston’s Bull Run: Its Strategy and Tactics.

I made the changes, but think I’m going to revamp the Arty OOBs a little.

I’ll also share an E. Porter Alexander map of the action at Blackburn’s Ford Jim provided.





Other Bull Run Projects

30 11 2008

You’ll notice on my Civil War Blogroll and Links List two sites with the same name, First Bull Run.com.  Both sites are maintained by the UK’s Jonathan Soffe.  Jonathan has decided to separate his blog and his data compilation website.  The latter has been around a long while, longer than my site, and includes Orders of Battle down to company levels.  Johnathan has graciously permitted me to incorporate his research into my own OOBs, and I’ll be doing that gradually.  Johnathan will be listed on the OOBs as a contributor – currently I have listed only Jim Burgess of the NPS, whose name you’ll find at the bottom of the Artillery OOBs.

Johnathan’s blog just launched today.  He has set up the blog as a place “for users to share comments and information about the content of the [Bull Runnings.com web]site.”

Check both the blog and the website out when you get a chance.








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