The Maps of First Bull Run Update

16 06 2009

This for everyone who has been asking:

According to Ted Savas, Bradley Gottfried’s The Maps of First Bull Run was to ship from Savas Beatie’s warehouses yesterday (Monday June 15) to stores and wholesalers.





One More Thing on the Map Book

21 02 2009

Ted Savas tells me he is considering publishing softcover versions of the Atlas books – in addition to hardcovers – that will be spiral bound with coated pages.  The book would come with a grease pencil that you could use to take notes on the map pages (say, in the field).  The pages could be wiped clean later.  Due to restrictions of the larger bookstores and Amazon on spiral bound volumes, this edition would be available only through Savas Beatie or the NPS bookstores.  “Bundling”  with the hardcover (that is, selling them both as a package) is also a possibility

That sounds pretty cool to me: what do you think?

Also, a tour guide was cut out from the Maps of First Bull Run, but will be made available on line.  I don’t know if such is the intention for any other books in the series.





Interview with Brad Gottfried

19 02 2009

Author Brad Gottfried of the upcoming The Maps of First Bull Run was kind enough to take the time to respond to a few questions regarding the book and the Savas Beatie project in general.

What is the Savas Beatie Battlefield Atlas project, and how did you get involved?

The “Battlefield Atlas” project actually started with my Maps of Gettysburg book.  I had written a book entitled, “The Brigades of Gettysburg” that highlighted the activities of every infantry brigade that participated in the battle.  As a result of that book, I realized that the battle would be much more understandable if they had a series of good, accurate maps, accompanied by a descriptive text.  After some thought, I came up with the idea of a map book, where the map is on the right page and the description is on the left.  That book included over 140 maps and it has been well received.  Since that time, Ted Savas has decided to broaden the concept and has signed up authors to do maps of other campaigns.

Why did you choose Bull Run as your second project?

I basically decided to prepare a book on every campaign in the Eastern Theatre of the Civil War, so it was natural that I go in order.  I had been to the battlefield several times, but like so many others, really had trouble getting my arms around the swirl of events.

How does this book differ from your Gettysburg Atlas?

The book is similar to the Gettysburg Atlas with two exceptions.  First, and perhaps most important, the maps are in color.  This was one of the biggest criticisms of the Gettysburg volume.  The second difference is the length of the book.  The Gettysburg book ran 363 pages and contained about 140 maps; the new one on First Bull Run/Manassas, is 144 pages long and contains 51 maps.  It also includes a section on Ball’s Bluff.

What were the particular challenges of doing a Bull Run Atlas?

I think that Gettysburg spoiled me.  There are so many first-person accounts and so many analyses of what occurred there that I was able to get a much richer picture of what really happened.  Less is written about First Bull Run/Manassas and there is much more ambiguity.  Harry Smeltzer and Jim Burgess really helped me to sort out the fact from the fiction regarding the First Bull Run/Manassas campaign.  Jim Morgan did the same for the Ball’s Bluff section.

Were there any surprises while writing this book?

Not really.  I learned so much about the campaign.   If I had to name some, it was how close General McDowell came to winning this battle and how lucky the Confederates were in moving units into position at just the right time.  Most of us know about Stonewall Jackson’s gallant stand on Henry Hill, but I was surprised by how so many of his units were defeated at one time or another.

What’s up next for you in the series?

I will stop going in order now and concentrate on the most “popular” campaigns.  Next up is the Maryland campaign.  After that I may go back and work on the Second Manassas Campaign.  That book will probably be double the size of the First Bull Run/Manassas book.

Ted Savas was good enough to provide me with one map and corresponding facing text.  You can find the pdf file here.   The pages will face, text on the left, map on the right.  The map is lower res than what will be in the book.  If you can’t open pdf files (you can get a pdf reader for free, just enter “free pdf reader” into a search engine), below are clickable thumbs of each page.

text-17map-17

Again, you can register to be notified when this book becomes available here.





Bull Run Atlas Talk

15 02 2009

chatter

Lots of chatter on my post on the upcoming Bull Run Atlas, including some information on other entries in the series.  Check it out here.





Bull Run Atlas

13 02 2009

mapsLast year Savas Beatie announced that the second entry in its series of Civil War battle map studies would cover First Bull Run.  I was involved in reviewing the manuscript, and today I received more information on the book from marketing director Sarah Keeney.

The Maps of First Bull Run: An Atlas of the First Bull Run (Manassas) Campaign, including the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, June-October 1861 (ISBN 978-1-932714-60-9), by Bradley M. Gottfried, is scheduled for release in May, 2009.  The 7″ X 10″ hardcover will feature 51 full color maps with facing text and run 144 pages.  It will retail for $34.95.

Anyone wishing to “reserve” a copy can do so here; register to be notified when the book is ready to ship.

In the coming weeks, I’ll have some specific content for you – including, hopefully, a sample map.  Also look for my interview with the author.





New Map

4 12 2008

I know I haven’t posted much here or in the Bull Run Resources about the fight at Blackburn’s Ford on July 18, 1861.  I’ll get to that eventually, I promise.  But for now, I have updated the Maps page with the below image of a map of that action drawn by E. Porter Alexander.  Check it out.  Thanks to Jim Burgess of Manassas National Battlefield Park for sending me the image from the Park’s archives. 

Recently some e-quaintances and I were discussing the position of Ayres’ (Sherman’s) Battery during the fight.  It would appear from Alexander’s perspective the battery was situated somewhat to the east of the ford, but it’s not clear from the map to which of Ayres’ positions Alexander was referring.

You can leave comments here or on the Maps page, but here is probably better.

alexander-map





First Bull Run Atlas

15 10 2008

Thanks to this announcement from Drew, I now know that Savas-Beatie will be publishing a new book on Bull Run as Volume 2 of its Civil War atlas series.  It will be authored by Bradley Gottfried, who wrote the Volume 1 on Gettysburg.  As I commented on Drew’s site:

I have to worry a bit about an atlas of First Bull Run, because there are some big questions about who went where and when, particularly during the Henry House Hill phase of the fighting. There are missing ORs for some key regiments (like the 11th NY and all of Jackson’s brigade). Joanna McDonald has a ton of maps in her book, and in fact wrote a tour book for that part of the fighting, but I don’t know that there is enough data available to produce maps that one could call definitive. This should be interesting.

The book is scheduled for release in Spring, 2009.  I’m going to see what I can do about getting an interview with Mr. Gottfried.








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 850 other followers