Cancellation

25 01 2011

I received word today of the cancellation of the Rocky Mountain Civil War Symposium, The Eastern Theater from First Manassas Through the Seven Days Campaign in Aurora, CO, at which I was to speak on October 1, 2011.

Sell your stock in airlines and Denver area dining and lodging establishments, as the estimated 125,000 folks who wanted to see my dog and pony show have been forced to change their plans.  Sorry Chamber of Commerce, it’s not my fault!





Seminar on the War in 1861 and a Podcast Blog

23 01 2011

Thanks to Craig Swain for bringing this to my attention.  The Appomattox Court House National Historical Site announced that a seminar will be held at Longwood University in Farmville, VA on Saturday, February 26, 2011, The War Begins, 1861.  There are two lectures on First Bull Run that look interesting (I’m not implying that the other lectures are less than interesting by any means).  Here’s the schedule:

Jarman Auditorium at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia.

Schedule

9:00 a.m. Doors Open
9:25 a.m. Introduction by Dr. David Coles, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of History, Political Science, and Philosophy, Longwood University
9:30 a.m. David Ruth, The Nation Crosses the Rubicon: Fort Sumter 1861.
10:30 a.m. John Hennessy, First Manassas: Legends, Lies, and Misunderstandings.
11:30 a.m. Patrick Schroeder, The Fire Zouaves at Bull Run: Heroes or Humbugs?
12:30 p.m. Lunch
1:45 p.m. Jeffery Wert, “‘He Stood out from the Great War Canvas’: Jeb Stuart.”
2:45 p.m. Mike Gorman, Richmond Again Taken: Images of the Confederate Capital.

No reservations necessary. Signs will be posted on the Longwood University campus. For directions to the campus go to www.Longwood.edu.

For more information contact Dr. David Coles at 434-395-2220 or Patrick Schroeder at 434-352-8987 ext. 32.

Longwood also has a podcast blog at That a Nation Might Live.  It’s a little confusing – you have to click-through on each post to find a link to the podcast, usually located underneath an illustration.  Check it out.





Fairfax County’s Sesqui

19 01 2011

The good folks at Farifax County (separated from Prince William County by Bull Run) sent me some info regarding the observance of the Sesquicentennial there.

Just as it is today, Fairfax County, Virginia, was a strategic hub of activity throughout the Capital Region during the Civil War. The County will once again serve as the crossroads to history as the region plays host to myriad of commemorative events and special exhibits marking the Sesquicentennial, or 150th anniversary, of the Civil War beginning in Spring 2011.

Visit Fairfax, the official tourism organization for Fairfax County, Virginia, welcomes the world to stay with us for this momentous occasion. Centrally located in the region and literally on the border of Bull Run and Manassas National Battlefield Park, Fairfax County is the ideal base camp from which you can easily get to historic battlefields and attractions, the majesty of downtown Washington, DC, as well as modern luxuries, like award-winning restaurants, shopping and the Virginia wine country.

We invite you to visit our dedicated Civil War site and follow all our Civil War movements online through Facebook and on Twitter (@fairfaxcivilwar). Also be sure to sign up for our monthly Civil War newsletter that highlights the rich heritage of Fairfax County, VA and the region.

You and your Bull Runnings readers might also be interested in downloading the educational brochure we created. Contact Patrick Lennon (plennon@fxva.com) to order complimentary hard copies of the brochure.

Members of the media may contact either Sarah Maciejewski of Visit Fairfax or Melissa Gold of White+Partners PR for interviews, content or related images (contact information is listed below).

We look forward to commemorating the rich Civil War history of Fairfax County, Virginia, and the surrounding Capital Region with you over the next several years.

Best regards,





The Jacob Weikert Farm

11 01 2011

The February 2011 edition of Civil War Times magazine (previewed here) includes my Collateral Damage article on the Jacob Weikert farm south of Gettysburg, just outside the park boundaries on the Taneytown Rd and the back of Little Round Top.  I had visited the property and toured the house twice over the years prior to my return this past summer.  Friends Gerry and Beth Hoffman bought the place in 2002 and are wonderful stewards – they also run an antiques business from spring to fall each year in the barn (Tillie’s Treasures).  Unfortunately I had left my camera on a low res setting when taking my photos to accompany the article, and none could be used in the magazine.  So I’m displaying them here, along with some I shot on an earlier visit in 2006.  Click the thumbs for larger images – it might be a good idea to have my article handy.

Keep in mind that the Weikert farm is private property.  The Hoffman’s are “finest kind”, but please respect their privacy.

First the low res photos from my most recent visit:

  

The house from southwest, south and southeast.  

  

The carriage house and corn-crib; the barn from Taneytown Rd; the barn from the rear.

  

The dining room was used as an operating theater; bloodstains are still evident on the dining room floor; the site of the wartime well and the Weikert’s enduring legacy.

These are from 2006:

  

General Stephen Weed died here in the basement, where the washer and dryer sit today; rough-hewn beams in basement; the basement fireplace and oven where the Weikert’s and Tillie Pierce baked bread for hospital staff and wounded – note the charred beam above the oven.





Gettysburg College Civil War Institute Conference 2011 Schedule

1 12 2010

The schedule for the 2011 Gettysburg College Civil War Institute conference, Mobilizing for War and the Battle of First Manassas/Bull Run, has been announced.  They’ve put together quite a lineup of speakers and guides.  The conference runs from June 26 to July 1, with guided tours of the First Bull Run battlefield slated all day on Wednesday, June 29.  Each of the seven guides will be leading their own specialized tour.  The tours are part of the conference package and cannot be attended separately.   The guides are:

  • Ed Bearss
  • Ray Brown
  • Jim Burgess
  • Ethan Rafuse
  • Joe Rizzo
  • Harry Smeltzer
  • Greg Wolf

You can find the full conference schedule here; registration info here.  As more on the tours becomes available, I’ll let you know.





Seminar in the Woods 2011

13 11 2010

Dave Powell has announced the schedule for the next Seminar in the Woods at Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Military Park.

On Friday (March) 11 the group will travel by bus to McLemore’s Cove to spend the whole day looking at the action - and inaction – there.  Saturday will be a car-caravan first to the Viniard Farm and then to Mendenhall’s artillery line.

NPS Historian Jim Ogden and Dave are the guides.  Other than the cost of the bus on Friday, there is no charge for the tour.  Meals and lodging are on your own.





Manassas NBP 11/5/2010: Sudley Springs, Sudley Road, Thornberry House, Ballou

8 11 2010

This past Friday (11/5) I made a quick trip to the Manassas National Battlefield Park to do some research for an upcoming installment of Collateral Damage.  I met up with Ranger Jim Burgess and he helped me with some work in the park archives, then we met up with friend Craig Swain and headed to the northern end of the park boundary. 

Among other sites, we visited the area where (it is likely) Sullivan Ballou’s body was recovered after its mutilation, burning, and reburial by the 21st Georgia (click the thumbs for larger images):

   

The Thornberry House, used as a hospital after both battles of Bull Run (the large tree to the left of the house in the second picture appears on the Barnard photo from 1862):

 

A trace of the original Sudley Road:

 

And Sudley Springs Ford over Catharpin (Little Bull) Run.  This is the same view as in the Barnard photo Jim is holding – you can see the modern remains of the Springs on the opposite bank.  Hunter’s division crossed Bull Run to the east at Sudley Ford, then crossed here to reach the battlefield:

    

Thanks so much to Jim Burgess for all the valuable assistance he has provided over the years – a good guy.  Also thanks to Craig for his always valuable commentary.  As a last bit of coolness, and much to Craig’s satisfaction, Jim took us down to the basement of the VC and showed us one of the original 200 lb Parrott shells from the Battle Monument.  It turns out that these shells were live, and not discovered to be so until the monument’s renovations in the 1970′s.  One of the disarmed shells survived (the shells had been de-fused but not disarmed as the black powder and case shot show):





More on that Logo

3 11 2010

Here’s another article about the above 150th Anniversary Manassas logo and the artist who designed it.





Liberia Tour

1 11 2010

Opportunity for a detailed tour of Liberia on November 13.  Check it out here.

I will be at the Manassas National Battlefield this coming Friday doing field work for an upcoming Collateral Damage.  On Saturday I’ll be at Antietam National Battlefield with the Save Historic Antietam Foundation for our work day and board meeting.





Manassas Civil War Commemorative Event

13 10 2010

Here is a site dedicated to events scheduled in and around the park to commemorate the Sesquicentennial.  Check it out.








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