Incident at Vienna

17 06 2011

Today is the 150th anniversary of a little incident at Vienna, VA involving a trainload of Union soldiers and a dastardly “masked” Confederate artillery battery. The incident, to some minds, had an impact on how McDowell’s army would move through Northern Virginia a few weeks later – I’m not so convinced that it did.

Ron Baumgarten at Not All So Quiet Along the Potomac wrote some nice posts on Vienna recently, and you can read them here.

And Craig Swain of To the Sound of the Guns has a cool photo essay of the now rails-to-trails site of the action here.





Cool Bull Run Stuff on the Web

17 06 2011

A few links I ran across thanks to Facebook friends and others:

Go here for an overview of the battle and a cool animated map courtesy of The Civil War Trust.

Also from The Civil War Trust, John Hennessy talks about Jackson at Bull Run here. For more, see John’s article on the topic here.

And read this interesting bit on Matthew Brady at Bull Run from The Atlantic here.





Gettysburg NPS Blog on WordPress

2 06 2011

Thanks to the good folks at Mysteries and Conundrums for passing along the news that the Gettysburg NMP blog has moved to WordPress, ditching the woefully inadequate NPS platform.  Check it out here.





Gettysburg NMP Blog

15 04 2011

The good folks at the NPS at Gettysburg have started a blog, and you can find it here.

There appear to be few frills and no feed (I keep track of what’s going on in the sphere with my Google feed reader). I’m really not sure why they opted for this format when the good folks at Fredericksburg have blazed such a clear path, but it’s just starting out so maybe things will evolve.





“The History Guys” Podcast

12 04 2011

The American History Guys are three university professors who specialize on 18th, 19th, and 20th century American history. You’ll be most familiar with the 19th century guy, Ed Ayers of the University of Richmond. The others are University of Virginia instructors Peter Onuf (18th century) and Brian Balogh (20th century). I received an email from an intern at the show – Miriam – about a series of podcasts on the civil war. There are three in the series (The Road to the Civil War, Why They Fought, and The Civil War at 150: Questions Remain) and you can check them out here.





Civil War Interactive Writer’s Contest

8 04 2011

Civil War Interactive is having a writer’s contest. Details here.





The Essential Civil War Curriculum

21 03 2011

A little bird in the form of Donald Stoker passed along this link to a new Virginia Tech website put together by James “Bud” Robertson, William “Jack” Davis and J. L. D. “Laurie” Woodruff, The Essential Civil War Curriculum. From the site:

Peer reviewed by today’s foremost Civil War historians, the Essential Civil War Curriculum contains essays, bibliographies and other resources on the 400+ topics which constitute the basic knowledge that should be possessed by any serious student of the Civil War.

One of the tasks for the site is to attract historians (in their eyes, this includes professional historians, PhD students, and competent amateur historians – so this could mean you!) to contribute essays on topics not yet completed. Links in the upper right hand corner of the main page of the site will take you to the completed essays and also provide you with information on essay submissions.

It looks like an ambitious project, and I’m adding it to the recommended links here.





Elsewhere in Blogsville

9 03 2011
 
This is the first in what promises to be an interesting series of posts over at Civil War Bookshelf. I’ve discussed before (see here and here, for example) the murky origins of Irvin McDowell’s (left) rise to power in 1861. Dmitri proposes to delve into it more deeply – I think – with the added attraction of William B. Franklin (right). Franklin was a brigade commander in Heintzelman’s division of McDowell’s army at First Bull Run, but was apparently associated with McDowell in other ways.

Check it out.





OK, We’re Tweeting

25 02 2011

To paraphrase Bob Wiley:

Dr. Marvin! Dr. Marvin! Guess What? I Tweet! I’m a Tweeter! I Tweet!

Yep, I’m giving it a shot.  Follow us at @Bullrunnings.





Is A Puzzlement

4 02 2011

I admit it – I’m a sucker for The King and I. In 1977 I actually got to see a revival of the musical at the Uris Theater on Broadway. Orchestra seats. Yul Freakin’ Brynner. Close enough to see all the gears and stuff and the line where his face panel met his robot head.  OK, just kidding about that last bit, but he was awesome in Westworld, too. But yes, we were close to the stage, and Brynner in his late fifties looked like he could still kick ass, even while doing the polka.  And I love the film, though my wife gets very annoyed when I correct her on occasions when she inadvertently allows her head to be higher than King’s…er, mine.  But why am I talking about this?  The Civil War Trust has a Primary Sources entry up on their website about Abraham Lincoln’s rejection of the offer of Siam’s King Rama IV (aka Mongut at left as portrayed by The Man) of war elephants to help defeat the Confederacy.  Check it out.

And now for a little singin’ ‘n dancin':








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