Preview: Gottfried, “The Maps of the Bristoe Station and Mine Run Campaigns”

10 11 2013

91Bka6INr4L._SL1500_I have a soft spot for the subject of this latest entry in Savas Beatie’s Atlas series. Long before I decided to focus my energies on First Bull Run I attempted to tackle the period in the history of the Army of the Potomac between the end of the Gettysburg Campaign and the arrival of U. S. Grant in the spring of 1864. I wrote a bit about that aborted project here. The whole series of events has received short shrift from most historians, and usually gets covered in a few pages (or even paragraphs) when it gets covered at all. Brad Gottfried helps shed some more light on this time with The Maps of the Bristoe Station and Mine Run Campaigns. The subtitle gives a little more detail on the details: An Atlas of the Battles and Movements in the Eastern Theater after Gettysburg, Including Rappahannock Station, Kelly’s Ford, and Morton’s Ford, July 1863-February 1864. You’re familiar with the format by now: individual time-coded maps (87 of ‘em) with their own facing narrative page. This really is a must-have, not just to keep your set intact, but to give some much needed perspective to this black hole in the history of the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia.





Preview: Fitch & Fitch, “Postmarked: Bleeding Kansas”

9 11 2013

18437634Kansans (and Missourians, for that matter) are quick to point out that the Civil War started in that state, and there’s plenty of evidence to support the claim. The internecine character of the conflict out that way makes the history that much more gnarly to study and to follow. Chad Lawhorn, a writer with the Lawrence Journal-World, has gathered and published the letters of Edward and Sarah Fitch, abolitionist residents of Lawrence, in Postmarked: Bleeding Kansas, Letters from the Birthplace of the Civil War. This is a collection of more than 150 letters written from 1855 to 1863, which describe the bitter conflict as well as the day-to-day travails of pioneer life, and culminate with the August, 1863, raid on Lawrence by William Quantrill. All the terror of the raid seems captured in Sarah Fitch’s final letter, a fitting, if horrific, ending to the collection.

Note – This book is essentially a reprint of Yours for Freedom in Kansas, published by the Douglas County Historical Society in 1997.





Inside the Stone House

8 11 2013

Check out the hat on little Brando in the corner. “What are you rebelling against, Johnny?”





Meanwhile, Elsewhere in the Sphere

6 11 2013

I understand some of you are having trouble viewing these Facebook shares on you mobile devices. For Android, you may have to click through to the website itself. For iPhone, well, you made the decision to truck with the dark side, so you’re on your own.





Seven Years Blogging

4 11 2013

I missed the actual anniversary a couple days ago. So, I’m taking this opportunity to make my first ever post via mobile device (umm, phone.)

As I’ve said before, Bull Runnings has provided and continues to provide me with opportunities the like I never imagined: writing jobs, speaking gigs, and interactions with beaucoup interesting and generous folks.

Readership has levelled off since the heady days of 2011, in part due to my decision to move some types of posts over to social media, but also I think as part of a drop off in more casual interest in the Civil War in general. But that’s OK with me.

I thank all of you for your interest and participation now, then, and in the future. Good stuff still to come!








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