Preview: “The Civil War Lover’s Guide to New York City”

18 10 2013

NYCCWLoverI attended college back in the day when the mere thought of being forced into taking a job in New York City made a business major’s skin crawl (unless of course you were from there, then you thought it was great.) And as an ACW enthusiast later, I thought that there couldn’t possibly be much to see there outside of Grant’s Tomb. In Bill Morgan’s new The Civil War Lover’s Guide to New York City, I find there is far, far more to see in the city relating to the Civil War than I had imagined, though some of the links are tenuous at best. The book is laid out geographically by borough and neighborhood, and includes many period and modern photographs. The illustrations vary in quality and descriptiveness, and sometimes the narrative is vague as to whether or not the building in question still stands. I suppose I would have preferred more of a template layout by site. But the color photos of statues and monuments are at times stunning. As with most good guidebooks, this sturdy Savas Beatie paperback is ideal for packing along as you walk the city. Just be careful that you’re not “marked” as a tourist. I’ve seen enough episodes of Barney Miller to know how that will end (I’m still living in 1978 I guess.)





Preview: “Smithsonian Civil War”

17 10 2013


Smithsonian-Civil-War-Inside-the-National-Collection-Hardcover-L9781588343895
Smithsonian Books sent me a copy of this beautiful, coffee table (without legs) book, Smithsonian Civil War: Inside the National Collection. This is an old fashioned “picture book,” the kind that has hooked thousands of kids on the Civil War (or baseball, or whatever) over the years. Mine was The American Heritage Golden Book of the Civil War. As the title implies, the eye candy inside is from the Smithsonian’s Civil War collection, which has been acquired primarily via donation over the years. Photographs are grouped thematically and are accompanied with descriptive narrative often including the artifact’s journey to the collection. My copy has a slightly oily fragrance, likely a result of the process used to produce the full color images, but I imagine that will dissipate over time. I have a soft spot for books like this, as I can think back on long hours spent in libraries and on living room floors staring at those pictures. Do kids still do that? I like to think so.





Reference Library: Bibliographies

16 10 2013

Biblio

Bibliographies are handy when you want to find out more – who else has written on the topic? Some bibliographies tell you more than others, some are more comprehensive, some more specific. The problem with all of them is that by the time they’re compiled, printed, bound, and delivered to the marketplace, they’re already dated. I suspect bibliographies in hard-copy will go the way of the dodo before most other books do, likely replaced by an on-line version that can be continuously updated (will we see a reader compiled, wiki-like version some day?) and available for free. But for now, these will have to do:

 

Cole, Civil War Eyewitnesses: An Annotated Bibliography of Books and Articles, 1955-1986

Cole, Civil War Eyewitnesses: An Annotated Bibliography of Books and Articles, 1986-1996

Dornbusch, Military Bibliography of the Civil War (4 Volumes)

Eicher, The Civil War in Books

Sauers, The Gettysburg Campaign Bibliography

Woodworth, The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research





Liberia House Then and Now

14 10 2013





Smith Memorial Arch, Philadelphia

12 10 2013





Reynolds & McClellan Equestrian Statues Philadelphia

11 10 2013





Gettysburg Magazine Sold

10 10 2013








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