“Q”, 5th Maine, On the Battle

15 02 2012

Army Correspondence.

Alexandria, Va., July 26th, 1861.

Your readers have heard already enough about the battle at Bull Run, and yet they will be pleased to read still more. The writer is a member of the Maine Fifth, and will, therefore, refer to this regiment.

The Fifth was in the engagement with the Second, Third and Fourth, and was equally exposed to the fire of the enemy. The exposure continued, as the most say, one hour and thirty minutes. It was enough to satisfy any one, no matter how much he may have desired to behold a defeat of the enemy. Like the other Maine Regiments, the Fifth went on to the field with a largely reduced number in consequence of the awfully cruel march of six or seven miles at the double quick. No mortal can describe the scene presented. As we entered the field, we passed, for a mile, ambulances taking off the dead and dying. As we formed our column in the first ravine, prior to going on the hill, it was broken by the retreat of the cavalry, and then should our own forces have been allowed to retreat, and not exposed to the batteries of the enemy. But the object of this communication is to mention the names of some officers who were present in the field, or who took part in the fight on the hill. Col. Dunnell, Major Hamilton, and Dr. Buxton, were present and active in the fight. Dr. Buxton did not leave his post, but acted nobly his part. He was taken prisoner. Captains Thompson, Scammon, Thomas, Heald, Goodwin and Sherwood, were at their posts and rallied the men to duty. Capt. Sherwood was wounded in the left arm, but will soon be able to go to his friends in Portland. It is proper to say, that the above officers deserve much praise for their brave and heroic conduct in the hour of so great danger. Lieutenants Barrows, Co. C, Walker, Co. I, Bookman, Co. K, Moneon [?], Co. H, Sawyer, Co. [?], Kenniston, Co. D, and Walker, Co F, nobly met danger and bravely discharged their duties; most of the remaining officers of the regiment fell by the way completely exhausted by the fatigue of the march. The color Company, Co. D, Capt. Thompson, brought off our colors in fine style, and no officer can surpass Capt. T., in real bravery. Lieutenant Kenniston, of Co. D., has been taken prisoner. It is thought that Peter Horan, of Co. H, was killed.

Q.

Portland Daily Advertiser, 8/2/1861

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Contributed by John Hennessy

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