Tiger Rifles – Co. B, 1st Special Louisiana Battalion In the Battle

30 11 2011

News From The Tiger Rifles

The vivandier of the Tiger Rifles yesterday returned to this city from Manassas, and brought letters from two or three of the Tigers to their friends in this city. These letters give a detailed history of the Tiger’s sayings and doings since their departure hence, and especially their participation in the battles of Bull Run and Manassas. The loss of life among them, we are pleased to say, is much less than has been reported. They have twenty-six of their seventy-six, wholly uninjured, and several more who are but slightly wounded. That they fought like real tigers everybody admits and Gen. Johnston, it is said complimented them especially on the brave and desperate daring which they had exhibited. Lieut. Ned Hewitt reported here as having been killed, did not receive the slightest wound. Moreover, none of the officers of the Company were killed. Two of the Tigers who had been missing for several days after the fight, made their way to Manassas on Thursday last, one being slightly and other pretty badly wounded. The kindness of the Virginia ladies to the wounded soldiers is said to be beyond all praise – like that of a mother to a child or a wife to a husband. Soldiers so nursed and attended can never be anything else than heroes and conquerors.

The Daily True Delta, 8/1/1861.

Jackson Barracks – Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Vol. 113, p. 16.





Wheat’s Battalion at Stone Bridge

29 11 2011

Wheat’s Battalion at Stone Bridge

Although we have made great exertions to procure for the readers of the Bee a full report of the killed and wounded Louisianians in the great battle of Manassas Plains, it has been impossible as yet to obtain it at any outlay of trouble or expense of the Washington Artillery, all of heard; of Hayes Seventh Regiment we have scattering information of different companies; the Sixth, Colonel Seymour has few or no casualties; we know nothing concerning Colonel Kelly’s  Eight, but believe it suffered very little. Of the special battalion, under Major Robert C. Wheat, we know, also, that from its position and the necessities of the crisis, it was called upon to sacrifice itself. How it answered to the call of duty, its decimated ranks and shattered column can better tell. Its only two field officers, Major Wheat and Adjutant Dickinson, are both badly wounded at Richmond. Dickinson reported that of its four hundred men, only a quarter are left, but a correspondent who had better [means] of information writes that at roll-call, after the battle, less than half answered to their names, and that many of those who did were wounded. With the gallant Georgia Eight who suffered nearly as bad, our dauntless man charged a whole division of the enemy, composing their picked men, regulars Fire Zouaves, and their onset is described by an eye-witness “terrific”. The Tiger Rifles having no bayonets to their Mississippi Rifles, threw them away when ordered to charge, and dashed upon the Fire Zouaves with bowie knives. They are said to have been surrounded and cut to pieces.

As we have been unable up to this time to get the names of the killed and wounded we present to-day the names of the gallant men who have won for [themselves] such imperishable laurels, nearly half, [again], finding the cypress entwined with them. This spartan band will never be forgotten to Louisiana or to the South. We have an additional reason for publishing this list in the fact that a great many people do not know and are anxious to ascertain which companies composed the battalion that has been so prominently brought into notice. Wheat’s Battalion comprised five companies of bold and sturdy men who were well known to be panting for just such an opportunity as that in which they found a field for their valor at the Stone Bridge. This spirit was exhibited by one of the companies choosing their name – Tigers – which they have upheld with their knives. While in Camp here they were accounted “hard nuts to crack”, and no none doubted that they would signalize themselves in battle. Their spirit so pleased A. Keene Richards, Esq. that he fitted them out in a dashing Zouave uniform at their expense. The Catahoula Guerillas, from Trinity, were all animated with the same resolve, to win a name, even if in death. The Walker Guards were a hardy, experienced band of Nicaraguan boys who took their title from General W. Walker. The Delta Rangers and the Old Dominion Guard were crack companies of fighting men. Major Wheat has been Captain of the Old Dominions, and he took his Adjutant  from that company. We take the following list from the State muster rolls.

[Roster of Special Battalion of Louisiana Volunteers follows, see link below.]

New Orleans Bee, 8/1/1861.

Jackson Barracks – Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Vol. 113, pp. 3 – 4.





Five Years Blogging!

28 11 2011

Jeez, I’ve been so busy I forgot that this month marked Bull Runnings’ fifth anniversary! Thanks to all of you for taking the time to stop by and check out what goes on here. So far I’ve made 1,240 posts on various Civil War topics. Lately I’ve been trying to get back to adding to the resources section of the blog, and that will be my focus for the coming year.

I’m thankful that this modest site has opened so many doors for me, especially in 2011. I’ve had the opportunity this year to do things I never thought possible, like lead a tour for the Gettysburg College Civil War Institute, speak as part of the Gettysburg Foundation’s anniversary series, address three great roundtables in Pinehurst, NC, Washington, DC, and Leesburg, VA, and write for the Weider History Group’s fine publications America’s Civil War and Civil War Times. And I owe it all to Bull Runnings and you, dear readers.

Thank you.





Crescent Blues In the Battle

22 11 2011

From the Seat of War in Virginia.

The Crescent Blues, and the Eighth Louisiana Regiment.

Leechman’s, near Manassas August 25th, 1861  (Extract.)

Having concluded our interview with General Beauregard we took leave of him, and proceeded towards our vehicle…and turned our horses towards Manassas station, passing on the way several encampments…We reached the station…halting our vehicles inside of the extensive fortifications thrown up around the depot…

We remained long enough to inquire after the Crescent Blues, the fine independent corps commanded by that gallant and accomplished young officer, McGavock Goodwyn. The Blues are now attached to the 49th Virginia regiment, commanded by ex-Governor Smith, of whose gallant conduct in the battle of the 21st General Beauregard speaks in the most glowing terms.

The Blues acquitted themselves very handsomely in the battle of the 21st though they complain much of the commander of the battalion to which they were attached, who would not allow them to charge when they were eager for it. It was not until Captain Goodwyn urgently entreated the Major to allow him to do a little fighting on his own hook that the Blues were allowed a chance to signalize their valor and soldiership, which they did with brilliancy and effect. They had but one man wounded.  There was no sickness in the camp of the Blues, a fact which attests the good discipline of their young commander. Let, however, the experience of the Blues admonish our young soldiers at home of the impolicy of coming on here in independent company organizations. The chances of such corps winning laurels are very poor. Nearly all those here have been detailed for special duty, generally very disagreeable duty for young soldiers; and when sent into battle, are attached to regiments and battalions whose officers and men are entire strangers to them.

A. W.

The Daily Delta, 9/3/1861.

Jackson Barracks – Historical Military Data on Louisiana Militia, Vol. 113, pp. 159 – 160.

Notes





CCNMP Study Group 2012 Seminar in the Woods

21 11 2011

I received the following from friend Dave Powell:

CCNMP Study Group 2012 Seminar in the Woods.

March 9-10, 2012

Friday: All Day, on bus: meet at 8:00 a.m. at the CCNMP visitor’s center

Friday Morning  – 21st Corps in the Chickamauga campaign.

By bus, we will explore the movements of the Union 21st Corps as it occupies Chattanooga and then advances on Ringgold between September 9th and 11th, 1863. Less studied than the more famous action in McLemore’s Cove, Major General Thomas L. Crittenden’s advance on Ringgold still posed a threat to Bragg’s rail connection, moving south along the Western and Atlantic while the main Rebel army was falling back to LaFayette. Actions at Graysville and Ringgold highlight this phase of the campaign.

Lunch: Since we will be close to the park for most of the day, we will arrange for lunch at a local restaurant, probably the Park Place, between Noon and 1 PM.

Friday Afternoon  – Retreating as fast as they can go? Thomas at Rossville, September 21, 1863.

By bus, we will explore the Union retreat from the battlefield on the night of September 20th, and examine the position Major General George Thomas adopted by dawn on September 21st. Far from fleeing in disorder, the Army of the Cumberland had largely re-organized and was ready for a fight on Monday morning. We will also discuss the various Confederate efforts at reconnaissance of this new Union position, and how successful those efforts were.

Saturday Morning, 8:30 a.m.: Horatio Van Cleve’s Division on September 19th, on foot.

Between about 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. on September 19th, two brigades of Van Cleve’s 3rd Division, 21st Corps, attempted to turn the Confederate flank in Brock field. After some initial success against Marcus Wright’s Tennessee Brigade (including Carnes’ Battery) however, Van Cleve’s men met with more Confederates under A.P. Stewart, producing a bloody slugfest in the woods. Eventually, the Federals themselves were outflanked by elements of Bushrod Johnson’s Rebels, resulting in a collapse of the Union line.

Car Caravan from the visitor’s Center.

Saturday Afternoon, 1:30 p.m.:  Thomas J. Wood and the Battle of Chickamauga, on foot.

No general is more controversial than Tom Wood. His actions on September 20th will be examined in detail, from his infamous movement out of Brotherton Field to his final position on Snodgrass Hill. Along the way we will discuss his culpability in creating the crisis of “the gap,” his relations with other officers in the army, and his contributions to the defense of Horseshoe Ridge.

Car Caravan from the visitor’s Center.

Optional: Sunday, March 18thAndersonville, with Frank Crawford – car caravan.

Frank has offered to take us down to the National Prisoner of War Museum and historic site at Andersonville. Andersonville lies about 2 hours drive southwest of Atlanta, or roughly four hours south of Chattanooga. While it is remote, that very isolation only adds to the impact of the park and cemetery. Those who wish to attend would drive down on Sunday morning, and spend midday at the park (plan on a couple of hours.) For the return, for those flying it would be best to fly into and out of Hartsfield, in Atlanta.

Cost: Beyond the fee for Friday’s Bus, there is no cost for tour participation. Meals lodging, transportation, and incidentals, however, are the individual’s responsibility.

Tour Departures: All tours will meet at the Chickamauga Visitor’s Center at the designated start time, and will depart from there after some brief overview discussion. We will board the bus or car caravan to the designated parking area, and from there, we will be on foot. We will be on foot for up to three hours, so dress and prepare accordingly. Tours will depart rain or shine. Participants are responsible for their own transportation, and should plan accordingly. All tours are designed to be self-contained, so participants who cannot attend the full schedule are still welcome to join us for any portion of the weekend.

Lodging and Meals: Everyone is responsible for their own lodging and meals. There are many hotels in the greater Chattanooga area, for any price range. The closest are in Fort Olgethorpe, Georgia, with the least expensive in Ringgold. Each tour is designed to leave at least 90 minutes for lunch, and there are several family and fast food restaurants within minutes of the battlefield. There are designated picnic areas near the Visitor’s Center, for those who wish to bring a lunch and eat on the field.

What to bring: Each tour will involve extensive walking. Proper clothing and especially footgear is essential. Dress in layers, wear sturdy, broken-in walking shoes or boots, and be prepared for some rain, as spring can be quite wet in North Georgia. We will be walking on dirt and gravel trails, uncut fields, and through stretches of woods. The ground will be wet and muddy in places. Bring your own water and snacks.

Reading up on the subject: Many people like to prepare in advance for these kinds of events. I suggest the following works might be of help.

Cozzens, Peter. This Terrible Sound. University of Illinois, 1992. The best modern study of the battle.

Powell, David with Cartography by Dave Friedrichs, The Maps Of Chickamauga. Savas-Beatie, 2009.

Powell, David. Failure In The Saddle: Nathan Bedford Forrest, Joe Wheeler, and the Confederate Cavalry in the Chickamauga Campaign. Savas-Beatie, 2010.

Woodworth, Stephen E. Six Armies In Tennessee: The Chickamauga And Chattanooga Campaigns. Lincoln, Nebraska. University of Nebraska Press, 1998. An excellent overview campaign study.

——————-, A Deep Steady Thunder: The Battle Of Chickamauga. Abilene, Texas. McWhiney Foundation Press, 1998. Concise but very useful account of the battle, designed as an introduction to the action. 100 pages, very readable.

Note: Friday’s Tours will be by Bus, as we move from site to site. While the tour itself is free, we do have to pay for the bus.

Pre-registration Fee: $35 Due by February 1st, 2011

Send to:

FRANK CRAWFORD

34664 ORANGE DRIVE

PINELLAS PARK, FLORIDA    33781

Frank will hold your payments. If you pay by check, note that Frank will not cash those checks until we have sufficient entries, so that if we have to refund, Frank will simply send your checks back to you.

Please also note that this fee is NON-REFUNDABLE after February 1st, 2011. Once we are committed to the bus, we will be charged the booking fee.

If you wish to attend the Sunday trip to Andersonville, please inform Frank at this time.

On-site Sign up Fee: $40

We MUST have 20 attendees registered and Paid by Feb 1st, or we cannot reserve the bus. Once we confirm the minimum, you will be able to join the tour the day we depart, for late add-ons. If we do not meet the minimum, we will car-caravan for Friday’s tours.

Final note: Last year we raised a sizable amount of money over and above the cost of the bus, and were able to contribute a number of new titles to the CCNMP research library, mostly regimental histories of recent vintage. The park currently does not have operating funds allocated for these kinds of acquisitions, and depends entirely on donations to fund library additions. I feel that this is an ideal use for any excess funds we raise, in keeping with the “study group” mission.





Preview: Eric Wittenberg’s “Gettysburg’s Forgotten Cavalry Actions”

21 11 2011

Savas Beatie has revamped and updated Eric Wittenberg’s Gettysburg’s Forgotten Cavalry Actions (originally released in 1998 by Thomas Publications). In addition to coverage of the cavalry activities of July 3, 1863 from the original edition, you’ll find updates to Farnsworth’s Charge and Fairfield, new illustrations and replacements of older ones to show the effects of tree clearing, a new map, a walking and driving tour, and an essay that addresses an alternate interpretation of Farnsworth’s Charge that was put forth subsequently by another historian after the first edition was published.

So even if you have the original, check this one out – lots of new stuff.





Notes to Crescent Blues/Schaeffer’s Battalion

19 11 2011

This newspaper article (and this one, and this one, too) about a New Orleans company known as the Crescent Blues was a bit of an eye-opener for me. I didn’t have them listed on my Confederate Order of Battle, nor could I find them on any other OOBs in my collection. In fact the only place I could locate them, along with the rest of Schaeffer’s Battalion, was on Jonathan Soffe’s fine First Bull Run.com. See here. A. W. seems to be very prescient in his prediction that independent companies would find difficulty “winning laurels.”

It’s a little confusing, as W. F. Amann’s Personnel of the Civil War, Vol I, the Confedrate Armies lists both a Crescent Blues and a Crescent City Blues. By various accounts, the company was assigned the 49th VA Infantry for one month in September 1861; as sharpshooters to Company C of the Washington Artillery in October 1861; and Art Bergeron’s Guide to Louisiana Confederate Military Units 1861-1865 shows that McGavock Goodwyn ended the war as Lt. Colonel of the 15th Louisiana Infantry, of which Company B of the Crescent City Blues was Co. K.

I’m sure we’ll get this straightened out eventually.

I sent this clipping to Jim Burgess at MNBP, and got this response:

Schaeffer was attached to Cocke’s Brigade and they were positioned along Bull Run to the left of the 19th Virginia’s rifle pits above Lewis Ford. As the article states, they supported a section of Captain Latham’s battery but they were also in supporting distance of Lt. Heaton’s section of Roger’s Battery.   The article provides more details on their participation than I’ve seen before.  I was not aware a portion of the battalion joined Kershaw.  Nor was I aware of Schaeffer’s conduct which brought about the COI.

We are well aware of the duel between Captain White of the Tiger Rifles and Captain McCausland of Evans’ staff.  The duel took place on the grounds of the Pittsylvania plantation.      The cause of the quarrel is not entirely clear.   I suspect it was related to the movement of White’s company from Pittsylvania, where they had been initially deployed as skirmishers, to Matthews Hill, where they emerged in front of the skirmishers of the 4th S.C. and received (and returned) friendly fire.   White is believed to have accused McCausland of not delivering an order from Evans.  McCausland felt a need to defend his honor and challenged White.   Given the choice of weapons, White opted for the .54 caliber, M1841 “Mississippi” rifles with which his company was armed.  McCausland was mortally wounded in the duel and subsequently died at Pittsylvania.

Anyone with a line on the transcript or a summary of the Schaeffer court of inquiry (COI), please let me know.

Today, Crescent City Blues is perhaps best known as the smoky tune that would eventually become Folsom Prison Blues:








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 869 other followers