Collateral Damage: Call for Subjects

18 12 2010

As I may or may not have mentioned earlier, my Collateral Damage column has been picked up for another year with Civil War Times magazine. I’m really happy that editor Dana Shoaf decided to run with an idea I pitched to him during a Facebook chat and that the folks at the magazine and the readers liked what I came up with enough to sign on for another six pieces.

Now, here’s where you guys come in.  I have a few sites in mind already, but I can always use suggestions – if you’re a regular reader you know that the theme of the column concerns dwellings and their occupants that were impacted by the war, either as a result of their location on or proximity to a battlefield or due to their use during some other event associated with the war.  I prefer that the structure is still standing, but that’s not a prerequisite.  The dwelling or its site may be one that is owned by the NPS or other federal, state or local government agency, or it can be privately owned.  It’s a necessity though that documentation (on the history of the site and the occupants, before, during, and after the event) be available in some central repository, preferably at or near the site.  There’s a short turnaround time for these articles so I need to blitz the sources – make lots of copies – in one visit, paid either by myself or a surrogate.  And speaking of surrogates, I may need help in that area as well.  I can’t pay you, but I can thank you!

So, if you have any suggestions, leave them in the comments section.  Thanks!

About these ads

Actions

Information

28 responses

18 12 2010
Robert Moore

I think you need to tackle one of the sites here in the Valley, Harry. True, they aren’t NPS sites, and most aren’t state sites (actually, there’s only one state site in the Valley, in the middle of a battlefield). I just get a different feeling for the obscure sites that aren’t quite as appreciated as those that are on better known fields of battle.

19 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

I’ll consider anything, so long as I can research it quickly and thoroughly and it has a good story.

18 12 2010
Ron Baumgarten

Harry–

How about the Worthington House at Monocacy? (http://www.nps.gov/mono/historyculture/worthington_farm.htm) I agree with Rober that it might be interesting to look at a more obscure, lesser appreciated site.

Ron

19 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Ron, I was there this summer and walked all around that area – around the house and the trail there. Again, it will depend on how much material the park has for me to consider, and whether or not they’d let me in the house. I’m pretty sure the park owns that house – correct me if I’m wrong.

18 12 2010
Susan Evelyn McDowell Cole

Harry,

Mostly I have been tracking what General McDowell was doing in the west during the Civil War. Battles were fought in Arizona during the Civil War. I just finished a book called Tahoe Legacy which talks about how the Comstock mine was built and mined for its gold and silver beginning in 1864. Generals McDowell, Grant and Sheridan were at Lake Tahoe looking at the innovative civil engineering that was going on there. Do you want stuff like that?

Susan Evelyn McDowell Cole

19 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Interesting stuff, Susan. But not what I’m looking for for this particular series of articles. Always glad to hear more about it though.

18 12 2010
Chris Evans

I think some good sites would be the William Manse George cabin at Shiloh and the Shirley House at Vicksburg.
Chris

19 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Chris – good suggestions, but both would require help as I can’t travel out that way next year.

20 12 2010
Stephen Keating

Has anything been done on the Brawner house?

20 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Not sure what you mean by “has anything been done.” I know that I have not written about the Brawner house in this series.

20 12 2010
JE

How about the Porterfield house at Falling Waters (7/2/1861)…there’s no park or library, but I would think the FWBA could give you plenty of information on the property and the battle.

26 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

I like tyhe Bull Run tie-in Jon-Erik. Do you have any contact info? Remember, the story of the people who lived in the house, and what happened to them before during and after, is the focal point of the articles. A cool house alone won’t cut it ;-)

20 12 2010
Jim Schmidt

Harry – It’s a great series. As I mentioned in my Letter-to-the-Editor at CWT, I’d recommend the Ray House at Wilson’s Creek. I’ve visited there 3 or so times and do have soom good photos. I live too far from there now to visit again, but have corresponded frequently with Wilson’s Creek NPS historian Jeff Patrick and he is very accomodating. Congrats and keep up the great work! jim

26 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Thanks Jim.

20 12 2010
Brad Davidson

Harry, If you really want a challenge, why don’t you try one of the no longer standing residences at Manassas like the Matthew’s house, Pittslyvania, the Van Pelt house or Portici?

20 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Brad,

I don’t want to be specific, but in the very near future a no longer extant house on the Manassas battlefield will be the subject of Collateral Damage.

20 12 2010
Brad Davidson

Harry,

Excellent! I’m looking forward to your article.

Brad

20 12 2010
Scott Stemler

Harry,
I have really enjoyed this series. I would suggest the Stone House at Manassas and also the Sherfy House at Gettysburg for future articles.
Thanks, and have a Merry Christmas!
Scott

26 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Scott – I did two Gettysburg houses in the first six installments, so I’m not sure when I’ll do another. And of course the Stone House is on my radar, as is Dogan.

20 12 2010
Keith Yoder

Privately owned… still standing… lot’s of good stories…

26 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Keith – despite the link, your note is still a little cryptic – care to expand? Where is Level Green, a little background?

21 12 2010
Craig Swain

I cannot remember, but have you done either the Ray House at Wilson’s Creek or the Elkhorn Tavern at Pea Ridge?

26 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Not yet, Craig, though both have been suggested.

21 12 2010
Ken Noe

At Perryville you’ve got the Bottom House (standing and restored), the Russell House (gone), and the Widow Gibson cabin (facsimile being rebuilt).

26 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Ken, thanks for the info. Any connections out there?

22 12 2010
Tracey McIntire

The Pry House at Antietam is a good choice if it hasn’t been done. It was McClellan’s HQ during the battle and a field hospital–Hooker was treated there and Richardson died there several weeks after the battle. The Pry family was ruined by the experience and ended up moving to Tennessee. The house is open to the public during the warmer weather (starting in May, I believe) and is owned by the Park Service and operated by the National Museum of Civil War Medicine.

26 12 2010
Harry Smeltzer

Thanks Tracy. I try to move the locations around, and I recently did the Roulette farm. The Prys are interesting though, and their ties to the Cost family. And it would give somebody an excuse to let me on the roof of the house!

28 12 2010
Tracey McIntire

Yes! The view from the roof is spectacular and it is really amazing to be standing in the same exact spot as McClellan did.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 888 other followers

%d bloggers like this: