When is a Collection of Papers Not Really a Collection of Papers?

5 12 2009

Most folks who have read The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan assume that the collection consists of original correspondence merely transcribed and annotated by the editor.  See here for what much of it really is.  It’s not what you think.  For more discussion of these “letters” by the same blogger, see here.

Part II

Part III

Part IV

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine





Civil War Times – February 2010

4 12 2009

The new issue of Civil War Times has been mailed.  The cover is one of my favorite photographs of Robert E. Lee, taken on the steps of his rented home in Richmond shortly after the surrender of his army at Appomattox Court House.  Lee’s face clearly shows bitterness and defiance - perhaps he was still in denial.  I saw the lens Matthew Brady used to take this photo, in Warren Motts’s Military Museum in Columbus (see here).  This issue includes two Lee pieces, one by Gary Gallagher (Do the Numbers Add Up for “Marse Robert”?), the other by Noah Andre Trudeau (Lee’s Last Hurrah, about his postwar tour through the South).  Other feature articles:

  • Guerilla War on the High Seas by Craig L. Symonds
  • “To Rise Again”: the salvage of  USS Monitor by Kristina Fiore.
  • Seeing the War Firsthand:  rare newspaper sketches by Helen Hannon.
  • “Mimic War” No More: Phil Sheridan’s and Jubal Early’s faceoff in August 1864 by Fred Ray.

I also have a review of R. K. Krick’s entry in Broadfoot’s South Carolina Regimental-Roster Set, The 14th South Carolina Infantry Regiment, of the Gregg-McGowan Brigade on page 66.  And on page 15, I have a brief news item and photo on the Potomac Crossing and Shepherdstown Battlefield Tour program I wrote about here.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine





A Question for Pointy Heads

3 12 2009

OK, excuse the title of this post – I wanted to get your attention.  I’m not one of those outsiders who holds academe in disdain; I even have a few friends and acquaintances on the inside whom I like and admire.  That clarification made, I have a question for them and any others of their ilk who’d like to contribute: has good old-fashioned American self-loathing affected how the history of the middle period – those years surrounding and including the Civil War – has been interpreted and taught on campus?  If so, how?

Man, there are some great self-loathing cartoons out there, and even a fake magazine, but I didn’t have any time to get permission to use them.





Back

2 12 2009

John Wesley Powell

I’m back from an extended break from work and blogging.  Saw the Grand Canyon, and if you’ve never been, it’s something that can’t be described, photographed, or filmed adequately.  John Wesley Powell, a Union vet who lost an arm at Shiloh, explored and mapped the Canyon extensively; that was about the only Civil War connection I made the whole trip, and I think the family was pretty happy about that.  Anyway, I have some catching up to do work-wise, and will be back to posting soon.  I finished up Larry Tagg’s The Unpopular Mr. Lincoln, an important book, and will share my thoughts good and bad later.








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 781 other followers