“Black Confederate” at Bull Run

15 04 2009

dad-brownFar be it for me to not take advantage of the hit bonanza that is Black Confederates.  As a byproduct of his participation in this discussion, reader and Friend of Bull Runnings (FOBR) Robert Moore sends this along:

[In reference to Henry "Dad" Brown of the 8th SC at Bull Run]

“… on the 21st of July ‘61 the regiment was stationed at Mitchels Ford on the South side of Bull Run. The battle began two miles above and at 12 o’clock the regiment was ordered to go where the battle was raging. As soon as the order came Henry began to beat the long roll. This indicated to a battery on the other side of the Run the position of the regiment and the shells began to fall thick and fast. It was some time before the Colonel could stop him but he was beating all the time regardless of the danger. He followed on to the battlefield and was under fire with the others.”

Per Robert: “I found it at the site for the 37th Texas Cavalry. It’s from The Darlington Press, Nov. 1907, not long after he died. Wish I could get my hands on a hard copy for you, but I don’t think that’s possible unless I head to Darlington. Incidentally, I did look up the guy’s service record on footnote.com and it’s legit. He was on the rolls of both the 8th SC and the 21st SC. He is listed as a musician and “colored” on the Field & Staff rolls for the 21st, but neither of the company rolls for the 8th or the 21st say anything about his race. The information just meshes well. A free black who enlisted and stayed in the Confederate army… and stuck with the UCV in years after.”

Photo of “Dad” from the above mentioned site of the 37th Texas Cavalry.





Tax Break

15 04 2009

I apologize for the break in posts – as soon as I get up the courage to hit “send” on Turbo Tax, I’ll finish transcribing an article by John Hennessy which he graciously provided.  It’s pretty long, but I hope to finish it up tonight. 





Wilmer McLean

10 04 2009

Here’s a bit on Wilmer McLean.  In Beauregard’s report of the action July 17-20, you’ll see that McLean served as a guide for the Confederates and earned special thanks.





Whadyousay?

9 04 2009

clint_eastwoodIn this article we have yet another version of what Barnard Bee said to his men that resulted in the bestowing of the name “Stonewall” on Thomas J.  Jackson and his command.  If you click on the Stonewall Jackson tag in the list at the bottom of the column on the right of this page (or just click here if you’re lazy), you’ll find other discussions and accounts of the incident.

There seem to be two questions – what did Bee say, and what did Bee mean by what he said?  Did he want his men to “determine to die here”, to “rally behind the Virginians”, or to “go to his assistance”?  Did he mean that Jackson was holding firm, or that he wasn’t moving forward?  What do you all think, and why?





SHSP – The Soubriquet “Stonewall”

8 04 2009

Southern Historical Society Papers

Vol. XIX. Richmond, Va. 1891, pp. 164-167

The Soubriquet “Stonewall”

[From the Richmond Dispatch, July 29, 1891]

HOW IT WAS ACQUIRED

A few more years will forever seal the lips of all who can speak from personal knowledge of the incidents of the “War Between the States.” Any of them, therefore, who can now contribute to the perfect accuracy of history may be pardoned for doing so, even at the risk of incurring the charge of egotism. This is my only motive for troubling you with this brief article. I am one of those who heard General Barnard E. Bee utter the words which gave Jackson the name of “Stonewall.”

THE EXACT FACTS

The speech of General Early (as I have seen it reported) at Lexington on the 21st instant is slightly inaccurate in its account of this matter in two particulars. As this inaccuracy does injustice to other Confederate soldiers no less gallant than the “Stonewall” brigade, I am sure the chivalric old General and all others like him, with hearts in the right place, will be glad to have it corrected and the exact facts stated.

THE FOURTH ALABAMA

It was to the FourthAlabama regiment that the words were spoken by General Bee, about 2 or 3 o’clock in the afternoon of July 21, 1861. This regiment, with the Sixth North Carolina and Second and Eleventh Mississippi, constituted Bee’s brigade; and as the brigade arrived at Manassas from the Valley in detachments, so it went into and fought through the battle, not as a whole, but by separate regiments. The Fourth Alabama having arrived at Manassas on Saturday, the 20th, was in movement very early on Sunday morning, the 21st, from near the junction towards the upper fords of Bull Run. The dust raised by the march of the Federal army to Sudley’s ford having attracted attention, the Fourth Alabama was hurried by General Bee in that direction, and we reached before 11 A. M. the plateau of the Henry House, whereon the main conflict occurred afterwards.

A GREAT SACRIFICE

Bee seeing that this was a good position for defence, but that the Federals would capture it unless delayed before the Confederate forces could reach there in sufficient numbers, ordered the Fourth Alabama to hasten a half mile further north beyond Young’s branch and the wood over there to aid Evans, Wheat, and others in detaining the Federal army.

This duty we performed at great sacrifice, standing fast for an hour or more against overwhelming numbers, losing our Colonel, Egbert Jones, mortally wounded; Lieutenant-Colonel Law and Major Scott, disabled, and a great number of other officers and men killed and wounded.

Then in obedience to orders we withdrew from our advanced position and took position on the Confederate battle-line and in rear of the Robinson House.

GENERAL JOHNSTON SEIZES THE FLAG

Here, without field-officers and under command of a captain, the Fourth Alabama maintained its ground and did its part in resisting the enemy. General Johnston at one time came to us there and led us forward on a charge against the enemy, bearing our flag in his own hand. That glorious old warrior never appeared more magnificent than he did at that moment on his prancing horse and flaunting our colors in the face of the foe, who fell back before us.

SMITTEN WITH FIRE

Soon after this, the leading design of the Federals all day being to turn the Confederate left, the heaviest fighting veered in that direction, and in consequence the enemy disappeared from the immediate front of our regiment, leaving us unengaged; but the fearful crash after crash of the Federal musketry, as fresh troops poured in against the Confederate centre and left, can never be forgotten by those who heard it. Farther and farther round its awful thunders rolled as if nothing could stay it. Our brigade comrades of the Sixth North Carolina separated, from us in the manœuvres of the day, had rushed in single handed and been smitten as with fire, and their gallant Colonel Fisher and many of his men were no more. Jackson and his glorious brigade were struggling like giants to withstand the fierce onslaught.

THE WORDS OF BEE

It was just at this moment our Brigadier-General Bee came galloping to the Fourth Alabama and said: “My brigade is scattered over the field, and you are all of it now at hand. Men, can you make a charge of bayonets?” Those poor, battered, and bloody-nosed Alabamians, inspired by the lion like bearing of that heroic officer, responded promptly, “Yes, General, we will go wherever you lead, and do whatever you say.” Bee then said, pointing towards where Jackson and his men were so valiantly battling about a quarter of a mile to the west and left of us,” Yonder stands Jackson like a stone wall. Let us go to his assistance.” Saying this, he dismounted, placed himself at the left of the Fourth Alabama, and led the regiment (what remained of them) to Jackson’s position and joined them on to his right.

A CHARGE

Some other reinforcements coming up, a vigorous charge was made, pressing the Federals back. In this charge Bee fell mortally wounded, leading the Fourth Alabama. Barrow fell, not far from the same time and within a stone’s throw of the same spot, leading his Georgians. All the world knows how the Federals shortly thereafter were seized with a panic and fled incontinently from the field.

THE ERROR COMPLAINED OF

It is not true that General Bee said “rally behind the Virginians,” or behind anybody else. It is not true that he was rallying his men at all, for they were not retiring. The glory of the Stonewall Brigade does not need to be enhanced by any depreciation of the equal firmness and heroism of other men on that historic field. Let it never be forgotten that the Fourth Alabama lost more men on that day than any other regiment but one in the Confederate army, and every field from there to Appomattox was moistened with the blood of her heroes. But several of them still survive to corroborate, to the letter, the statement I have given you above.

Very respectfully,

WILLIAM M. ROBINS,

Former Major Fourth Alabama

Statesville, N. C., July 14, 1891





Sullivan Ballou Redux

8 04 2009

Here’s another version of Sullivan Ballou’s famous letter.  Hat tip to Dmitri.

Not my cup of tea, but whatever floats your boat.  See here for all my posts on Ballou, including what I think is the most complete and accurate version of the letter (the whereabouts of which are not known).





Southern Historical Society Papers

7 04 2009

I’ve set up this page as an index for Bull Run related articles in the Southern Historical Society Papers.  As I post the articles here I’ll link them to the index, as well as to the OOBs.

I don’t have hard copies of the SHSP, so I won’t be able to check the articles that I pull from disc for accuracy (typos, etc…).  So if you see any mistakes, please don’t hesitate to let me know via the comments feature on each post.








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