Bull Run Atlas Talk

15 02 2009

chatter

Lots of chatter on my post on the upcoming Bull Run Atlas, including some information on other entries in the series.  Check it out here.





#2 – Col. Orlando B. Willcox

15 02 2009

Reports of Col. Orlando B. Willcox, First Michigan Infantry, of Skirmish at Fairfax Court-House

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, pp 309-310

HEADQUARTERS SECOND BRIGADE, THIRD DIVISION,

Fairfax Station, July 17, 1861

SIR: After leaving the Old Fairfax road this noon with my brigade, we proceeded with an advance guard in skirmishing order and pioneers with axes, and felt our way until the skirmishers came upon this point. The enemy fled precipitately without firing a shot, but we succeeded in capturing a sergeant, a corporal, and nine men, belonging to the First Alabama Rifle Regiment. They occupied two camps, and are reported to have been two regiments, of about 1,000 men each, from Alabama and Louisiana. We found every evidence of hasty departure—provisions; fires burning; a box of medical instruments, partly consumed; a secession flag, &c., in their camps. Our most extended skirmishers towards the left saw also some cavalry scattering and flying.

The enemy must have been early apprised of our coming, but whether their main body had left before we commenced cutting the road I cannot tell. The earthworks were, as supposed, near the railroad. There was a masked earthwork in the woods farther about a mile west of the station, but no guns in any of them. I await the colonel’s further orders at this point, having promptly returned after following the Fairfax road two and a half miles and communicating with Colonel Miles.

Very respectfully,

O. B. WILLCOX,

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade

Capt. C. McKEEVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Division

[Indorsement]

This is the only secession flag captured during the first Bull Run campaign.

S. P. HEINTZELMAN,

Colonel Seventeenth United States Infantry

—–

FAIRFAX STATION, July 18, 1861

Capt. J. B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fairfax Court-House:

SIR: I have just received a dispatch from Colonel Heintzelman. He is still at Sangster’s, waiting orders. Not knowing whether he has succeeded in communicating with you otherwise, I deem it best to report the fact myself.

I can get guides to Wolf Run Shoals and Bacon Race Church. I deem it necessary to have both telegraphic and railway communication with Alexandria. Have sent word to this effect to General Runyon, and hope it is approved by General McDowell, but would respectfully suggest that orders be issued.

If we could have struck this point and Sangster’s about three hours earlier we might have taken about three thousand prisoners. The bridges beyond have been burnt by the enemy.

Very respectfully,

O. B. WILLCOX,

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade

Please forward the inclosed. Can I have a small mounted party of soldiers for carrying dispatches? I have to communicate with yourself, Colonel Heintzelman, and Alexandria, and the horses have to be taken from the teams.

Respectfully, &c.,

O. B. W.





#16 – Casualties, Tyler’s Division, July 21, 1861

14 02 2009

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, p 351

16p351

Click for clearer image





Bull Run Atlas

13 02 2009

mapsLast year Savas Beatie announced that the second entry in its series of Civil War battle map studies would cover First Bull Run.  I was involved in reviewing the manuscript, and today I received more information on the book from marketing director Sarah Keeney.

The Maps of First Bull Run: An Atlas of the First Bull Run (Manassas) Campaign, including the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, June-October 1861 (ISBN 978-1-932714-60-9), by Bradley M. Gottfried, is scheduled for release in May, 2009.  The 7″ X 10″ hardcover will feature 51 full color maps with facing text and run 144 pages.  It will retail for $34.95.

Anyone wishing to “reserve” a copy can do so here; register to be notified when the book is ready to ship.

In the coming weeks, I’ll have some specific content for you – including, hopefully, a sample map.  Also look for my interview with the author.





#6 – USA Artillery Lost July 21, 1861

13 02 2009

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, p 328

6p328

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Ranger Greg Coco

12 02 2009

Ranger Greg Coco

In this post I wrote about a short walking tour I took at Gettysburg this past August, led by Ranger and prolific author Greg Coco.  I noted in that post that Mr. Coco offered an unusually candid and humanistic narrative as he led our group to the Widow Leister house and The Angle, admonishing us all to take time to think of all the good things we have, and not to focus on the negatives.”  Later that day, after the tour, I heard from a friend that Mr. Coco was very sick with cancer.  That news cast the things he said that day in a different light.  I chose not to write about that, because I really didn’t know the man and wouldn’t discuss his health on a public forum.  I find today that Greg Coco passed away early yesterday morning.  I have not been able to track down an obituary online.  A memorial service is scheduled at the Gettysburg NMP Visitor’s Center this coming Saturday at 4 pm.





#6 – USA Casualties July 21, 1861

11 02 2009

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, p 327

6p327

Click for clearer image








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