Sharp Fighting in North Carolina

25 03 2008

 

I’m back from the Tar Heel state.  Pool-wise, Pitt really hurt me – I had them in the final four, but I picked Davidson to win two games and being there to see them both made up for the Panthers’ annual disappointment (I’m a Penn State grad, and despite a graduate degree from Pitt I find it very, very hard to root for them; but they looked so strong going into the tournament…)

I did manage to make it over to Hillsborough for about half an hour on Saturday (an off day at the Raleigh site).  I’ll post some photos from that trip either tonight or tomorrow.

In the meantime, check out my friend Teej Smith’s guest-post on Orton Williams over at Rantings of a Civil War Historian.  It’s well worth your time.





Hiatus

20 03 2008

I don’t anticipate posting anything here for the next few days.  I’m taking a break due to March induced Madness.  I’ll be back next week.  Until Thursday rolls around, of course.





Proposed Power Plant

20 03 2008

Here is a blog post about a proposed power plant ½ mile from the Warrenton Pike-Sudley Road intersection.

To the Sound of the Guns looks like an interesting site, focusing on battlefield stomping and historical markers.  I’ll keep an eye on it and may add it to the blogroll.





A “New” Lincoln Blog

20 03 2008

lincoln.jpgSince Brian Dirck has discontinued his popular A. Lincoln Blog, I’ve added Geoff Elliott’s The Abraham Lincoln Blog to the blogroll at right.  I do a fair amount of Lincoln reading, and will be doing a lot more in the future, so I think it altogether fitting and proper to have our 16th president represented on the roll.





#26 – Capt. James Kelly

19 03 2008

 

Report of Capt. James Kelly, Sixty-ninth New York Militia

O.R.– SERIES I–VOLUME 2 [S# 2] — CHAPTER IX, pp 371-372

HDQRS. SIXTY-NINTH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. M.,

Fort Corcoran, Arlington Heights, Va., July 24, 1861

SIR: I have the honor, in the absence of Colonel Corcoran, missing, and Acting Lieutenant-Colonel Haggerty, killed in action, to report to you that on Sunday morning, July 21, at 3.30 o’clock a.m., under orders of Major General McDowell, and the immediate command of Brigadier-General Tyler, the Sixty-ninth Regiment New York State Militia moved forward from their camp at Centreville, and proceeded by steady march to within a mile and a half of the enemy’s battery, situated on the south bank of the creek or ravine known as Bull Run. At this point we halted, Colonel Corcoran commanding, Lieutenant-Colonel Haggerty being second in command, Capt. Thomas Francis Meagher acting as major, and Capt. John Nugent as adjutant. The regiment numbered one thousand muskets, and was attended by one ambulance only, the other having broken down. The Sixty-ninth had good reason to complain that whilst regiments of other divisions were permitted to have baggage and provision wagons immediately in the rear, the regiment I have the honor to command was peremptorily denied any facilities of the sort. The consequence was that the Sixty-ninth arrived in the field of action greatly fatigued and harassed, and but for their high sense of duty and military spirit would not have been adequate to the terrible duties of the day.

Under your orders, the Sixty-ninth deployed into line of battle on the left, and, occupying the woods in that direction, there awaited the attack of the skirmishers of the enemy, who were reported in advance upon our right. No change was effected in our position on the left of the road leading to the battery of the enemy, which position, in conformity with your orders, we determined to maintain at every cost, and whatever the consequences might be, until orders were given for our regiment to advance by close column by division, and take the enemy in rear and flank. This they did with the utmost alacrity and precision, advancing through every obstacle until the regiment reached Bull Run. Here they crossed the stream and ravine in single file, and, ascending to the meadow where the enemy lay close and thick, poured in by successive companies an effective fire upon the rebels. The regiment, having formed in the meadow, marched in two-rank formation until the command “Front” was given, when they halted in line of battle, and steadily awaited the order to charge upon the batteries in front.

In the mean while Acting Lieutenants-Colonel Haggerty was killed by a Louisiana zouave, whom he pursued as the latter was on his retreat with his regiment into the woods, and several of our men were severely wounded.

After sustaining and repelling a continuous fire of musketry and artillery, directed on us from the masked positions of the enemy, our regiment formed into line directly in front of the enemy’s battery, charged upon it twice, were finally driven off, owing principally to the panic of the regiment which preceded us, and then, under a desperate fire, retired to the line from which we had advanced on the battery, and then endeavored to reform. The panic was too general, and the Sixty-ninth had to retreat with the great mass of the Federals.

In this action I have to record, with deep regret, the loss of Colonel Corcoran (supposed to be wounded and a prisoner), Acting Lieutenant-Colonel Haggerty, and others, of whom a corrected list will be speedily forwarded.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JAMES KELLY,

Captain, Acting Colonel, Sixty-ninth Regiment

Col. W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Brigade





“New” Bull Run Eyewitness Account

19 03 2008

 

I really don’t like to post the entire text of articles someone else has written for the web and usually just put up a link (hey, they wrote it, they deserve the hits!), but this is a news article and they have a tendency to disappear after awhile.  The letter in question was part of that lot of SC letters that was fought over in the courts for so long.  Here’s the link, but just in case I’m putting up the text, too.  I hope this letter is made available on the web.  This is from The State.com, South Carolina’s Home Page for 3/18/2008:

Vivid Civil War letter makes its way to library

By JAMES T. HAMMOND

A vivid piece of South Carolina’s Civil War history will enter the public domain this week when more than 30 descendants of Sgt. Maj. William Sidney Mullins donate to USC’s South Caroliniana Library a richly detailed letter he wrote about the Battle of First Manassas.

The letter is intriguing because it lacks the hope-and-glory style of many letter writers of the period. Mullins offers a cold, uncompromising view of the first large-scale battle of the Civil War.

Mullins’ enthusiasm over the Confederate victory was tempered when he observed in a heavy rain the cries of the wounded, some of whom implored “the passersby to kill them to relieve their agony.” Mullins declared, “If it please God, to stop this war, I will unfeignedly thank them.”

He describes a scene in which soldiers debated whether to go ahead and bury a dying soldier rather than wait for him to expire.

The letter — which will be presented to USC President Andrew Sorensen on Thursday by Mullins’ descendants — was part of a private collection of more than 450 letters and documents that South Carolina tried — and failed — to claim as state property.

Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court ended a legal battle over the collection, allowing to stand a U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that the government in 1865 did not make a timely effort to recover the papers and that the statute of limitations had expired.

Wade Mullins, a Columbia attorney and descendant of William Sidney Mullins, read a newspaper story about the collection and decided to try to obtain the letter. Lawsuits interrupted that process.

On the day last year when the letter finally came on the auction block, the initial bid was $10,000 from a competing collector.

The family had agreed they would bid as high as $10,000 if necessary to secure the letter written by their ancestor.

“I decided we just couldn’t let this piece of history slip through the family’s hands; not only out of the family’s hands, but outside the state and up North,” Mullins said.

Mullins won the bidding at $11,500.

“The South Caroliniana Library is a place I’ve always felt a close connection with, and I think the rest of the family feel it will receive the attention and care that it deserves,” Mullins said.

Allen Stokes, director of the library, said a lot of Civil War materials are available at auctions. And more and more families are donating their inherited collections to the library.

“We get a lot of collections every year because so many South Carolinians had ancestors who served in the war,” he said.

“People are recognizing that these materials are historically valuable and should be placed in a collection where they can be studied by scholars,” Stokes said.

“There are many descriptions of that battle, but it is certainly one of the most significant I have ever seen. This may be one of the most important letters in that collection.”

Most of the collection comprised correspondence of the governor’s office during the Civil War, including draft copies of letters written by S.C. Govs. Francis Wilkinson Pickens and Milledge Luke Bonham, as well as letters they received.

Patrick McCawley of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History believes Mullins’ letter ended up among those documents because Gen. William W. Harllee gave the letter to Pickens to make him aware of the conditions in the Confederate Army.

“We didn’t want the letter to go out of state and be lost forever,” said Louisa Tobias Campbell, great-great-granddaughter of Mullins and a Columbia resident.

“We wanted it preserved, and we knew the library would take care of it so that it always would be available to family members, historians, scholars and others,” Campbell said. “W.S. Mullins wrote the letter to General William W. Harllee, whom he respected and felt comfortable with to be so honest and open. That’s why the letter has such integrity.”

“We have thousands of letters of officers and enlisted personnel. This is as important as any other single letter that we have,” Stokes said. “The letter was to the lieutenant governor (Gen. William W. Harllee), and he endorsed it, so I think it is pretty obvious that he passed it along to Governor Pickens.”

State officials believe the papers were taken by Confederate Maj. Gen. Evander McIver Law as Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s Army approached the state capital in 1865. Law had been the provost marshal in Columbia but was relieved of his command, said Rodger Stroup, director of the state Department of Archives and History.

Stroup said there is no documentary evidence that points directly to Law taking the documents from the besieged capital. But he said the collection was passed down through generations of Law’s descendants.

Last year, after winning the court battle, Thomas Willcox of Seabrook Island sold the documents at auction. Willcox is the great-great-grandnephew of Evander McIver Law.

Stroup, the chief custodian of the state’s documents, joined with the state Attorney General’s office to try to reclaim the documents, which they maintained were part of the wartime governors’ papers. They contained reports from Col. Robert E. Lee, who, early in the war, was in charge of Charleston’s defenses.

 





Central Ohio Civil War Round Table – Columbus

18 03 2008

This past Wednesday (March 12), I made the 3 hour drive to Columbus to deliver my Threads presentation to the Central Ohio Civil War Round Table.  Mike Peters, the round table’s group historian (programs director) and an old e-quaintance with whom I’ve stomped Civil War battlefields in North Carolina, met me at the Holiday Inn in Pickerington.  From there we went over to what’s left of Camp Chase, which served as a training camp, parole camp, and prison camp during the war.  It’s most famous as a facility in which both prisoners of war and civilian detainees were held, and over 2,200 of them rest in the cemetery that represents all that is left of the once vast camp (I reviewed in brief a new book on Camp Chase in the May 2008 issue of America’s Civil War ).  One of those buried there is an ancestor of Mike’s – that’s them in the last photo below (click on the thumbnail for a larger image):

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We spent a short while in the cemetery, and then drove to the offices of Blue & Gray Magazine.  There I was introduced to Jason Roth, who works with his father Dave, the founder of the magazine.  I was about 19 issues short of a full run of Blue & Gray, and had packed a list of all the issues I needed, which of course I left back at the hotel.  I remembered one of the issues off the top of my head (a rare occurrence) which Jason had in stock.  I also purchased a copy of Tom McGrath’s new book on the Battle of Shepherdstown, and told Jason I would try to stop by the next day before heading for home (I did return, and bought another three back issues – now just 15 to go!).  Here is the home of the magazine:

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 Next we drove to the Motts Military Museum in Groveport.  This place is a real jewel, with a wonderful collection of paraphernalia spanning American military history.  The museum is now the home of the Pickett’s Charge diorama formerly displayed in the Gettysburg Cyclorama; numerous edged weapons and firearms; uniforms; tanks; helicopters; a rare WWII Higgins boat; an exact replica of Columbus native Eddie Rickenbacker’s  boyhood home; and much more.  After wandering the grounds, Mike introduced me to the director, Warren Motts.  Many of you have met Wayne Motts, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide and the Director of the Adams County Historical Society.  Warren is Wayne’s father, and all I can say is the apple didn’t fall far from the tree.  Talk about energy and enthusiasm!  Warren showed us the new (unopened) wing of the museum, which has lots of stuff from NASA (including a live feed!), an extensive collection of women’s uniforms, and the lens used by Matthew Brady to photograph Lee on his porch in Richmond after Appomattox.  The last photo below is of Mike (l) and Warren (r):

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 It was getting pretty late, and the meeting was to begin at 7:30, so Mike dropped me at the hotel where I changed.  About 10 minutes later I was back in Mike’s car and we met another member of the round table, author and fellow blogger Eric Wittenberg, at Max & Erma’s for dinner.  I’ve known Eric for about seven years, and realized that I hadn’t seen him in nearly three, so it was nice to have some time to catch up.  Check out his very kind comments regarding my presentation.  Thanks for the plug, Eric.

The meeting was held in Westerville, which is a pretty cool Victorian town.  I had a little time to schmooze with some of the members I had met a few years ago in North Carolina, and round table President Tim Maurice had some business to conduct, so I began my program around 7:45.  About 35 folks showed up, and  I started off by taking this picture (sorry, it’s out of focus):   

 

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I think things went pretty well.  Mike had told me that the speaker usually goes 30-45 minutes.  I went to about 9:15, and only one person had to leave during the program.  I didn’t have any time for a formal Q&A (I think on a Wednesday night most folks had already had a long day), but there were quite a few questions during the presentation and three or four hung around afterward to chat.  Thanks to the fella (Jamie Ryan) who provided the probable identity of Colonel — whose death Romeyn B. Ayres felt would enable his family to be proud (see here) as Norval Welch of the 16th MI.  Welch’s actions at Little Round Top on July 2, 1863 had cast a shadow over his reputation.  He was killed at the head of his regiment at Peebles Farm on Sept. 30, 1864.  Here’s a photo of Welch that I found on this site:  

 

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All in all, a good trip.  The reworking of the program really paid off, and the whole thing flowed a lot better.  Thanks to Tim Maurice, Mike Peters, Eric Wittenberg and everyone at the Central Ohio Civil War Round Table for a great time, and for their pledge of a donation to the Save Historic Antietam Foundation.

 

 








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